Post Offices Serving Department of Defense Installations


Handbook PO-630 April 2000


Post Offices Serving Department of Defense Installations
Handbook PO-630 April 2000
A. Explanation. This handbook provides information and guidance to postmasters and station managers of post offices serving Department of Defense (Department of Defense ) installations. It is also designed to be utilized by military mail managers to understand postal concepts and to partner with their counterparts in the U.S. Postal Service. This handbook is subject to change based on user input.
B. Updates. This handbook will be updated as necessary.
C. Additional Copies. The initial release of this handbook is accessible on the Internet at http://es.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/po630.pdf. It is also accessible on the corporate intranet at http://blue.usps.gov [click on "Information," then "Policies and Procedures," then "Handbooks," then either "By Document ID Number" or "By Title," and then scroll down to this handbook]. The first printed edition is scheduled for release pending field input and review, and information for ordering additional copies will be provided at that time.
D. Comments on Content. Address comments or questions regarding the content of this handbook to:
OPERATIONS SYSTEMS - DELIVERY
US POSTAL SERVICE
475 L'ENFANT PLZ SW RM 7142
WASHINGTON DC 20260-2808
A. Comments on Format. Address comments or questions regarding the language or organization of this handbook to:
INFORMATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
US POSTAL SERVICE
475 L'ENFANT PLZ SW RM 2800
WASHINGTON DC 20260-1540
E. Effective Date. This publication is effective April 2000.

John A. Rapp
Vice President
Delivery

1 Introduction
1-1 Purpose
The purpose of this handbook is to provide information about the mail community on Department of Defense (Department of Defense ) installations to the postmaster or station manager and to the clerks and carriers. It also provides information to the Department of Defense mail manager and to the associated Department of Defense mail offices on how the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) operates, as well as providing specific information on automation, centralized delivery, organization, and address management.
This handbook is designed as a reference tool for the USPS and Department of Defense communities. It should be kept readily available for reference when problems arise, or for questions on the Department of Defense 's chain of command or what office should be consulted for support and assistance. This handbook will help the USPS managers, as valued members of the Department of Defense community, to understand their role in that community and what their responsibilities are. Success as a manager of a U.S. Post Office on a Department of Defense installation does not require previous military service; however, it is essential to understand the military's chain of command and understand how to be successful in that community.
1-2 Working Together
The relationship between the U.S. Postal Service and the respective Department of Defense installations is a partnership, with varying levels of benefit and responsibility. At many installations, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense mail center are located in the same building. Even though these two organizations may be close physically, they still need to communicate directly and to work together to better serve their mutual customers and create "win-win" resolutions to common problems.
Both the U.S. Postal Service and the installation's Department of Defense mail center serve essentially the same customer - the Department of Defense community. The U.S. Postal Service does this by providing individual box service to those customers who desire it, city delivery service to family housing areas, and bulk delivery of mail to military administrative offices and unaccompanied military personnel. The local post office on the installation accumulates mail for the military installation and distributes it in bulk to the Department of Defense mail center, which then distributes and delivers it. Thus, USPS operations have a significant impact on when and how mail is delivered on the installation.
You should take the initiative and understand the synergy and interrelationships that ultimately provide mail service to the Department of Defense community. By establishing a good working relationship, you will gain a better understanding of working together and how each group can benefit the other to improve customer service while minimizing cost. Each manager should tour the local Department of Defense mail center and understand its workload, mail flows, and work processes. Conversely, invite the Department of Defense mail manager to visit the USPS facility to gain knowledge on operations, schedules, and workload.
This handbook is an official publication of the U.S. Postal Service and should be referred to in the management of a postal facility on a Department of Defense installation served by the U.S. Postal Service. However, Publication 38-A contains the guidelines for managing post office operations on Department of Defense installations.

2 The USPS/Department of Defense Relationship
2-1 Background
On February 2, 1959, the Department of Defense and the Post Office Department executed an Interagency Agreement. The Agreement was comprehensive in scope, addressing all aspects of mail service to military personnel serving in the United States and abroad. (There had been two previous Interagency Agreements, one executed in 1927 and one executed in 1950, but neither one had been comprehensive in scope.) In the Agreement, the Post Office Department agreed to do the following:
a. "Provide postal services for the Armed Forces in areas where the U.S. civil postal service operates, to include the establishment of civil post offices on military installations and the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services, consistent with U.S. postal laws and regulations, normal standards of the Post Office Department, and changing military requirements;
b. "Provide the equipment and furniture necessary for the operation of civil post offices located on military installations."
However, the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970, which created a quasi-independent U.S. Postal Service, voided the 1959 Interagency Agreement and dramatically changed the relationship between the two parties. This legislation, which became effective January 1, 1971, directed the Department of Defense to cease Military Postal Service operations in areas served by the U.S. Postal Service and required the two parties to negotiate a new agreement - a process that required numerous years.
On January 11, 1980, the General Accounting Office Report LCD-80-2, How Military Postal Service Operations Can Be Improved, stated that negotiations were deadlocked over four issues, one of them being the level of domestic services that the U.S. Postal Service would provide to the Department of Defense . The Department of Defense wanted the U.S. Postal Service to provide military barracks and bachelor quarters with locking mailboxes similar to those provided to civilian apartment houses. However, the U.S. Postal Service wanted to deliver mail to military barracks and bachelor quarters in bulk form because it considered such quarters similar to civilian dormitories and residence halls, which receive mail in bulk form. The U.S. Postal Service believed that delivery service to military quarters should not exceed the level of service provided to similar groups of civilian residential customers.
2-2 Publication 38
On February 21, 1980, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense signed an agreement in which the U.S. Postal Service agreed to furnish mail service to military installations in the continental United States commensurate with the delivery service provided for the civilian population of comparable characteristics. This agreement required establishing civilian post offices on military installations and providing the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services consistent with postal laws and regulations of the United States, normal standards of the U.S. Postal Service, and changing military requirements. However, the level of domestic mail delivery, which was one of the four deadlocked issues, was not included in the agreement.
On February 22, 1980, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense signed a supplemental agreement concerning administrative details. In this supplemental agreement, the two parties agreed to use USPS criteria in considering extensions of delivery service. This agreement also specifies that mail will be delivered in bulk as follows:
a. To principal administrative buildings or commands.
b. To personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less.
c. For individuals in basic units where criteria will not allow free delivery service to be established or extended. However, in locations with adjacent civilian communities having delivery service, the U.S. Postal Service agreed to submit proposals to the Department of Defense to furnish service to groups of receptacles consistent with mutually agreed criteria and funding.
Furthermore, the Department of Defense agreed to deliver mail to personnel in a temporary duty status, in training, and where delivery requirements exceeded U.S. Postal Service standards. The U.S. Postal Service agreed to maintain change of address forms and endorse forwardable mail that is undeliverable as addressed where they deliver the mail.
The U.S. Postal Service published this agreement and supplemental agreement as Publication 38, Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense.
2-3 Publication 38-A
In June 1983, the U.S. Postal Service published Publication 38-A, Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations. This publication establishes the policy of the U.S. Postal Service in implementing the joint agreement stated in Publication 38. This document contains the following general policy statement:
"Mail delivery service on military installations in the United States should be commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided civilian communities of comparable characteristics."
This statement is in accordance with Publication 38. However, the interpretation of this sentence has varied from site to site. This difference in interpretations made by the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense is an ongoing source of concern for the two organizations. The U.S. Postal Service views these installations as being similar to universities, while the Department of Defense views them as small cities. The policy of the U.S. Postal Service is to provide a level of service to Department of Defense customers commensurate with that to a small college or university rather than that to a small city.
Much of the rest of the document contains restrictions that also effectively limit that policy statement. For instance, Publication 38-A contains the following statement:
"Deliver official mail addressed to principal commands on military installations in bulk. Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or military units are housed in a single building, deliver all mail to a central point in the building."
However, the delivery service provided on Department of Defense installations depends upon the type of mail being received, the type of organization receiving the mail, and, in the case of personal mail, the status of the individual and the type of housing in which the individual resides.
The U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense still do not agree as to the commensurate level of service as enumerated in Publication 38-A. A current working group composed of representatives of the Military Postal Service Agency and the U.S. Postal Service has been established to review Publication 38-A and possibly revise this document to allow for the change in postal organization and the business needs of the two parties.
Nevertheless, the guidelines in the current Publication 38-A still determine the local delivery relationship. Section VI discusses situations in which changes in this delivery relationship can be made. Each situation must be viewed on its individual merits, and changes should be made when they are mutually beneficial to both parties. However, changes to the published guidelines can be negotiated and approved only through the Office of Delivery Policies and Programs, Delivery, Headquarters.
2-4 Proper Street Addressing
One reason the U.S. Postal Service delivers mail to the Department of Defense in bulk is that military addresses are often incompatible with automation and addressing efforts and, therefore, such mail cannot be sorted efficiently and delivered promptly to the intended recipient.
In 1988, Postmaster General Anthony Frank personally approved the inclusion of the Department of Defense ZIP+4 Codes in the Postal Service's ZIP+4 File. This file is now part of the Address Management System database, which is the basis for all automated mail processing decisions and is used by mailers to qualify for automation-based postage discounts. However, it was later discovered that most Department of Defense addresses could not be put into the database because they did not include street addresses or post office boxes.
On October 2, 1990, the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Production and Logistics published a policy requiring buildings on Department of Defense installations to be renumbered in street address sequence. On November 5, 1990, the Military Postal Service Agency memorandum entitled Address and ZIP+4 Codes published instructions necessary to carry out the policy. This policy has been accomplished in varying stages among the various military branches and on individual bases.
When a Department of Defense installation has renumbered its buildings in street address sequence, the U.S. Postal Service manager at the branch post office must work with the Address Management staff at the local district to conduct an audit and validate that the new street addressing is actually proper. Once the street addressing has been validated, it is critical that it be used for all addressing functions on base. This requires a significant change in procedures for the installation - using street addresses rather than building numbers for delivery, references, and directions on base. It also carries a substantial cost for the installation - new signage on all facilities, new street signs, changes in base telephone and business directories, notification of correspondents, etc. But it also has a significant benefit: when Department of Defense installations have proper street addressing, the U.S. Postal Service can use automated mail processing equipment to sort the mail and deliver it more easily and efficiently.
2-5 Reviewing Delivery Services
Inherent with the move to street addressing was the implied benefit of letter mail being processed to a finer depth of sort. Combined with the reduction of manual clerical distribution, this can add value to both postal and military mail operations. Department of Defense installations that established proper street addressing programs also often requested increased delivery services from the U.S. Postal Service. However, in 1992, the U.S. Postal Service stated that it believed that the service provided to the Department of Defense was at least equal to, and in many instances surpassed, the service provided to comparable civilian customers, and it indicated that it would not provide increased delivery service.
On May 25, 1993, a Military Postal Service Agency-Official Mail Manager memorandum entitled Address Standardization/USPS Delivery to Street Addresses announced the formation of a working group to develop a unified Department of Defense position/strategy regarding the USPS domestic delivery issue. The working group received the following input on delivery:
a. The U.S. Air Force indicated a desire for the U.S. Postal Service to deliver only to building mailrooms, Postal Service Centers (PSCs), or activity distribution offices, and it noted that the average Air Force base has approximately 80 business mail delivery points. The U.S. Air Force also proposed that the U.S. Postal Service not be asked to provide additional deliveries until the servicing postal activity has automated equipment in place to sort the mail.
b. The U.S. Navy said that the working group should first focus on the type of delivery the U.S. Postal Service will provide as a minimum on military installations. After minimum delivery standards have been agreed to, the individual services and their field activities should have the discretion to determine the extent of mail delivery on their installations. The U.S. Navy also indicated that it wants the U.S. Postal Service to deliver mail to unaccompanied housing.
The working group met several times and decided to conduct a one-time survey of Department of Defense installations and affiliated agencies to determine volumes of incoming and outgoing mail, postage revenue generated, current delivery arrangements, and desired delivery arrangements.
In June 1994, the Military Postal Service Agency sent to the U.S. Postal Service a proposed revised Department of Defense /USPS agreement asking for mail to be delivered as addressed. In 1996 the USPS and the Department of Defense conducted a joint survey at representative bases from all branches of the military community to determine the current cost and scope of military mail services provided on base. This study determined the relative cost of providing mail services by the four military branches and informed the U.S. Postal Service as to how the Department of Defense provides basic mail services. As a result of this survey, the U.S. Postal Service informed the Department of Defense that the U.S. Postal Service would not change existing policy and delivery in general to Department of Defense installations.
In October 1998, a Military Operations Review was conducted at offices that participated in the 1996 survey as well as at additional representative offices. This review identified systemic operational inefficiencies at representative Department of Defense installations. Among the recommendations of this review were the following:
a. Improve Department of Defense addressing to meet USPS addressing standards for automation.
b. Implement letter mail automation where sufficient letter mail volumes and sufficient opportunities for decreasing manual letter mail operations are present.
Through these processes, postal manual processing costs could be reduced, and Department of Defense costs to sort this mail upon presentation could also be reduced. This review also revealed that the communication levels between the postmaster/station manager at the branch post office on the installation and the Department of Defense mail manager were minimal. Such low communication levels prevent problem-resolution at its lowest levels, and can create situations in which the Department of Defense customers are not provided prompt, efficient service. However, by establishing an on-going communication channel, USPS distribution efforts can be focused to prepare the mails at the time and in the format needed by the Department of Defense mail center.
A current working group composed of representatives of the Military Postal Service Agency and the U.S. Postal Service is examining how the two groups can work more closely together, share expertise, and improve efficiencies by both parties. Although they have narrowed their differences, the groups have significant differences in their expectations of delivery service levels.
Prior to implementing any increase in delivery service levels, local management needs to consult the district manager of Operations Programs Support and the manager of Post Office Operations. If necessary, local management can contact the area manager of Delivery Programs Support. The final authority For these types of decisions is the manager of Delivery Policies and Programs at U.S. Postal Service Headquarters.

3 Protocol
3-1 Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the organization structure of the various Department of Defense installations, so that the USPS community will know whom to contact to resolve various situations and problems that might arise. It also provides an overview of the current USPS organizational structure to help the military community in its dealings with the U.S. Postal Service. In order for our organizations to work together effectively, each organization must understand the composition of the other and the responsibilities of the various components.
3-2 Points of Contact on Military Installations
3-2.1 Overview
The Postal Service representative needs to contact different personnel on the Department of Defense installation for various issues. Although the titles of these personnel might differ on installations of various branches of the military, their roles are similar. See the chart in Exhibit 3-2.1a and the flowcharts in Exhibit 3-2.1b through e.
3-2.2 Mail Manager
The first person to contact regarding any mail issue on the installation is the installation's mail manager. This person is the equivalent of the base postmaster or station manager, and in many instances is a civilian with a specialty in mail services. This individual has the most knowledge of both official and personal mail operations on the installation and can assist you with any military mail issue. You should establish a good rapport and consult with this person frequently to take advantage of his or her contacts and knowledge. This person is usually a senior enlisted person (E7-E9) or civilian employee with a grade of about GS-9.
3-2.3 Mail Supervisor
The mail supervisor is the mail manager's immediate superior and supervises and oversees all mail operations on the installation. Contact this person if an issue cannot be resolved through the mail manager. This person usually has a rank of O4 or O5.
3-2.4 Supervisors of Other Areas
3-2.4.1 Facilities
The facilities supervisor is responsible for all facility issues on the installation, including family housing, facility maintenance issues, maintenance of centralized delivery equipment, and new construction/repair on carrier traveled streets. Maintaining contacts with this supervisor can make it easier to resolve many carrier street concerns and to plan for future change. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.2 Security
The security supervisor is responsible for all security issues on the installation, and coordinates facility alarm and other security issues. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.3 Vehicle Passes
The person responsible for issuing vehicle passes for employee vehicles and official mail vehicles might be the same as the security supervisor, or it might be another individual. Obtaining base access is one of the key issues for U.S. Postal Service employees. Generally, U.S. Postal Service employees reside off base, and the mail generally is processed off base, but both employees and the mail need to pass through the installation gates to provide efficient service. During times of heightened security, simply getting on and off base can be challenging. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.4 Surplus Government Equipment
Each installation has an individual responsible for supervising the submission and reissue of surplus government equipment. Some installations have a Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO) that manages surplus government equipment. As a governmental agency representative, the U.S. Postal Service may be able to receive surplus property before it is made available to the general public. Contact this individual or the DRMO if you are interested in obtaining and identifying usable office equipment and surplus government equipment for postal use. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.5 Base Supervisor
The base supervisor oversees the individuals responsible for mail, facilities, security, etc. This person is generally the second-highest ranking officer on the base. Contact this person if an issue cannot be resolved through the supervisors involved. This person usually has a rank of O6.
3-2.6 Base Commander
The base commander is the highest ranking officer on the base. Contact this person when all other attempts to resolve issues at lower levels have failed. This person usually has a rank of O6 or O7.
Exhibit 3-2.1a: Points of Contacts at Department of Defense Installations

Title and Usual Rank/Grade of Individual

POSITION/ISSUE

AIR FORCE

ARMY

NAVY

MARINE CORPS

Mail Manager
Official mail manager
* E7-E9 or civilian employee (GS-9)
Official mail manager
* E7-E9 or civilian employee (GS-9)
Director of postal operations
* Civilian employee (GS-12)
Postal officer
* Warrant officer (W0-W4)


Mail Supervisor
Communications squadron commander
* Major (04) or lieutenant colonel (O5)
Department of information management
* Lieutenant Colonel (O5) or civilian employee (GM15)
Commanding officer (CO) of the Fleet Industrial Support Center (FISC)
* Captain (O6)
Supply and logistics (S-4)
* Major (O4).


Facilities
Civil engineering squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of counter intelligence and security
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of public works
* Civilian employee (GS-12)
Director of public works
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Security
Security forces squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of counter intelligence and security
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of security (Shore Patrol)
* Commander (05)
Military Police
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Vehicle Passes
Security forces squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Provost marshall
* Major (04) or lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of security (Shore Patrol)
* Commander (05)
Military Police
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Surplus Government Equipment
Supply squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of logistics
* Lieutenant colonel (O5) or civilian employee (GM14 or GM13)
Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO)
Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO)


Base Supervisor
Support group commander
* Colonel (O6)
Garrison commander
* Colonel (O6)
N/A
Battalion commander
* Colonel (O6)


Base Commander
Wing commander
* Colonel (O6) or brigadier general (O7)
Installation commander
* Colonel (O6) or brigadier general (O7)
Installation commander
* Rear admiral (O7)
Installation commander
* Brigadier general (O7)

Exhibit 3-2.1b: Air Force Chain of Command
Not Available


Exhibit 3-2.1c: Army Chain of Command
Not Available

Exhibit 3-2.1d: Navy Chain of Command
Not Available

Exhibit 3-2.1e: Marine Corps Chain of Command
Not Available

3-3 Staff Meetings
One of the best ways to stay in touch with what is happening on the installation is to attend the weekly staff meetings hosted by the base commander. The postmaster can learn of up-coming events and changes in the military community that makes up his customer base, and this will help the postmaster plan programs and projects and make sound business decisions on staffing and other issues impacted by the military community. Attending these meetings will also give the postmaster an opportunity to make appropriate announcements regarding the post office and the customers on the installation.
3-4 Personal Mail
When the topic of mail is discussed with military authorities, the topic normally discussed is official mail. The resources and efforts of the Department of Defense installation are focused on administratively managing the facility and carrying on the governments business. The greatest volume of personal mail handled on base is delivered by the US Postal Service to the family housing areas. This personal mail is delivered by city letter carriers using postal vehicles, and wearing postal uniforms. In most cases, these carriers will work out of a post office on base. This can be an associate office or be the branch of a larger office.
Personal mail addressed to unaccompanied military personnel is not normally delivered by the U.S. Postal Service. This mail can be delivered to the work address, or delivered by military/government employee/contractor to a designated individual mail receptacle. The issue of the timely and private receipt of personal mail by unaccompanied military personnel is considered to be a "quality of life" issue by the Department of Defense and is of serious concern. The responsibility for this type of personal mail lies not with the official mail manager but with the Adjutant General's Office. In case of service problems or complaints, contact the official mail manager to determine what office has responsibility on each individual installation.
3-5 Chain of Command in the U.S. Postal Service
3-5.1 Station Manager
The station manager at the Department of Defense installation is the first point of contact for Department of Defense personnel on issues regarding mail delivery.
3-5.2 Postmaster
The postmaster is responsible for a geographic community. Department of Defense officials should address any postal problems, concerns, or changes regarding the military community to the postmaster. If the local post office on the installation is a station, all concerns should go through the station manager first. If the problem transcends the postmaster's authority or area of responsibility, he or she will forward the issue to the proper postal official.
3-5.3 Manager of Post Office Operations
A manager of post office operations (MPOO) is responsible for managing a large number of post offices and supervising the postmasters of those offices. MPOOs report directly to the district manager. Any change in service resulting in budgetary changes should be submitted by the postmaster through the MPOO.
3-5.4 District Manager
The district manager is the senior postal official in the district and is responsible for all offices in the district.
3-5.5 Area Vice President
The area vice president is the senior postal official in the area (the U.S. Postal Service has established ten areas throughout the United States). The area vice president reviews and approves facility plans for the districts under his or control.
3-5.6 Headquarters
Rather than being in the line of authority, USPS Headquarters in Washington, DC, provides support to all levels of the organization when problems arise or assistance is needed to resolve a situation.

Exhibit 3-5.1: U.S. Postal Service Chain of Command
Not Available


4 Military Mail Flows
4-1 Introduction
The flow of mail on military installations is significantly different from that in the U.S. Postal Service. On a military installation, USPS "mail" is only one part of the total workload. This chapter provides USPS managers an idea of the various kinds of military mails so that they can understand the role and interaction of USPS mail with the total military mail workload. By understanding this interaction, the USPS manager can determine the impacts and merge points of these two different operations, which will help the U.S. Postal Service and Department of Defense mail center work together in a more mutually beneficial way. For example, understanding this interaction can lead to a better knowledge of when outgoing mails are available from the major military customers so that postal transportation can be reviewed, consolidated, and possibly minimized.
Secondly, it is essential to understand the distinction that Department of Defense installations place on official mail versus personal mail. The Department of Defense is an organization whose primary mission is defending the citizens of this country. As such, it focuses on the administrative affairs that allow it to fulfill its mission. While both types of mail are important, Department of Defense places a higher emphasis on official mail. Department of Defense installations do not mix the handling of official mail and personal mail.
4-2 USPS Mail
The U.S. Postal Service delivers the mail to the USPS branch post office at the installation. Generally, the mail comes into the post office sorted by the military installation ZIP Code. Then USPS postal clerks manually sort/case this mail into a group of break-outs, which are finer sortations of the mail that may represent individual activities on the base or simply major commands. If the U.S. Postal Service prepares mail for the installation by Delivery Point Sequence (DPS), the USPS postal clerks may efficiently process the military mail in delivery order on automation equipment. Downstream handling can also be minimized through the use of flat break outs and phantom routes. Phantom routes are additional routes in the Address Management System database used for processing mail into finer sortations, particularly by customers using carrier route pre-sort. After the USPS postal clerks sort the mail, the branch post office delivers it to the Department of Defense mail center, which at many installations is located in the same building as the USPS branch post office but at some others is located in a separate building.
Once the Department of Defense mail center receives the mail, military postal clerks sort it to the exact military address. It is then handled in one of three ways:
a. The mail is transported to other military post offices for delivery to tentative commands/activities.
b. The mail is picked up by authorized unit mail clerks of individual commands.
c. The mail is sorted and finalized by delivery point so that it can be delivered directly to addressees or picked up by addressees.
At most Navy installations, incoming USPS mail is handled in one of two ways:
a. Mail is received at a USPS branch post office at the installation, and individual commands pick up their mail at this site.
b. The USPS delivers mail to a central Navy site that is then responsible for final distribution. In these cases, the Navy either delivers directly to addressees, or addressees pick up the mail from this site.
At most Air Force installations, the USPS branch post office at the installation delivers the incoming USPS mail to the Base Information Transfer System (BITS).
4-3 Consolidated Mail
The Department of Defense has developed a procedure to significantly reduce mailing costs by efficiently using Priority Mail. Mail that is going to other Department of Defense installations that is not time-critical is held in a rack or pouch system, rather than mailed as individual pieces at a single-piece rate. At set times (established by volume and delivery times), this mail is gathered together and condensed into an appropriate container, and this one article is sent by Priority Mail to the Department of Defense mail center at the appropriate Department of Defense installation. The Department of Defense mail center then routes the various pieces to the appropriate recipients. For this purpose, Department of Defense installations should have the toll-free number and web address to order Priority Mail pouches, boxes, and pre-addressed labels.
Military mail clerks at the Department of Defense mail center collect routine official correspondence or documents during the business day and review them prior to metering to see if they are destined for a location on the installation's consolidation list. They consolidate the appropriate mailpieces, address them to the commanding officer of that activity, and forward them under a single cover (up to the 70-pound maximum weight limit). They must endorse this mail "CONTAINS CONSOLIDATED CORRESPONDENCE" in large writing in the lower left quadrant of the address side of the container.
The Department of Defense mail center handles incoming/outgoing consolidated mail as described in the following sections.
4-3.1 Incoming
Upon receiving consolidated mail from other military installations, military postal clerks at the Department of Defense mail center open the article and distribute the mail to the individual commands.
4-3.2 Outgoing
The Department of Defense mail center is responsible for consolidating all outgoing correspondences of similar addresses to the same consolidation point, placing the mail in a bag, envelope or container, applying postage, and dispatching it to the U.S. Postal Service. If the mail is metered by the Department of Defense mail center, the Department of Defense mail center must present this mail to the U.S. Postal Service on the date indicated by the meter, because this is a legal postmark per the U.S. Uniform Commercial Code.
4-4 Interoffice Mail
At installations of the different services, interoffice mail is referred to by various terms: BITC (Air Force bases), Holy Joe (Army bases), interoffice (most Navy bases), and guard mail (Marine Corps bases and some Navy bases). This correspondence stays within the military mail system, so the U.S. Postal Service doesn't handle it and no postage is applied.
Internal activities and organizations on the Department of Defense installation use interoffice mail service when sending unclassified correspondence to addresses located within the same Department of Defense installation. The Department of Defense mail center serves as the established central distribution point for incoming/outgoing interoffice mail.
The Department of Defense mail center distributes interoffice mail to the various internal offices on an installation at varying times and with varying frequencies depending on local policy. This mail might be distributed only once a day (such as when a unit picks up its mail at the Department of Defense mail center), or it might be delivered twice a day (such as by a BITC truck).
4-5 Overnight Services
4-5.1 USPS Express Mail
Overnight services to APOs/FPOs, international addresses, and addresses not serviced through the General Services Administration (GSA) annual contract are sent by USPS Express Mail.
4-5.2 General Services Administration (GSA) Annual Contract
The GSA contracts on an annual basis for overnight services for Federal government agencies, including the Department of Defense . For overnight services within the United States, most military installations utilize the GSA overnight service contractor. The current contractor charges a minimum-weight single piece rate significantly less than any rate commercially available. The distribution point is the Traffic Management Office (TMO) at every installation, and the military recommends that a letter justifying the service accompany the correspondence. Also, since the Department of Defense has deemed the current overnight service contractor to be a secure process for the transmission of registered items, there has been an increase in the use of this overnight service contractor's product for registered items on military installations.
4-6 Accountable Mail
4-6.1 Definition
Accountable mail consists of Express Mail, Registered Mail™, certified mail, numbered insured mail, and return receipt for merchandise. Positive photo identification and signature is required before delivery.
4-6.2 Official Mail
The U.S. Postal Service is to deliver all official accountable mail only to an authorized Department of Defense agent. If there are consistently more than two pieces a day (even though some days might have no pieces or only one or two pieces), the USPS clerk records delivery using PS Form 3883, Firm Delivery Book, rather than PS Form 3849, Delivery Notice/Reminder/Receipt. The Department of Defense agent delivers the article at the command/activity to an individual authorized by the commanding officer to receive and/or open official accountable mail. The Department of Defense mail center maintains a chain of receipts and keeps records on file for the required period of time as noted in the Department of Defense Official Mail Manual. The Department of Defense agent may use PS Form 3883 for keeping records on file.
4-6.3 Personal Mail
All personal accountable mail is delivered by the U.S. Postal Service directly to the addressee, except when written authorization by the addressee has been granted to deliver the article to another individual. Unit mail clerks/orderlies are not authorized to sign for personal accountable mail that is not their own. In training units or on secure portions of installations, USPS delivery personnel use PS Form 3849 to notify an individual in a timely manner that personal accountable mail is available. The individual then must pick up the article directly from the local U.S. post office.
4-6.4 Registered Mail
When Department of Defense personnel collect registered or secret articles for mailing on an installation, the appropriate Department of Defense rules will be followed and the security of the mail will be accounted for at all times. Many installations use red bags to highlight these articles. These articles are the responsibility of the Department of Defense and are subject to Department of Defense rules and procedures until accepted by an authorized USPS agent.
4-7 Forwarding Mail
4-7.1 General
Sometimes a U.S. post office on a military installation receives mail without a complete or legible address. Rather than immediately returning this mail to the sender, the U.S. Postal Service usually delivers it to the Department of Defense mail center, which then delivers any mail requiring directory service to the installation's command mailrooms. (Each individual command on base will have its own mailroom and staff.) The command mailroom is also responsible for providing a forwarding address if the individual is no longer at the address on the mailpiece. Some Department of Defense installations have attempted to centralize these services in the Department of Defense mail center. If so, the Department of Defense mail center would provide directory service for mail that is addressed to individuals in transit, is illegible, or has an incomplete address.
Each installation has a base locator office that maintains a database containing the unit and assigned location of all assigned personnel, including personnel on temporary duty (TDY) and recent reassignments. This service is usually provided by a contractor, and it may be located with other contract mail services such as mail forwarding and unaccompanied housing (barracks) mail service.
4-7.2 Air Force Bases
Most Air Force bases have a postal service center with a locator function to redirect mail for newly arrived personnel or single personnel residing in a dormitory. Residents of base housing typically file change of address cards directly with the local U.S. post office for mail forwarding during their military reassignments.
4-7.3 Naval Bases
In an effort to reduce costs, the Navy has established consolidated mail facilities serving multiple Department of Defense installations and government offices. These facilities consolidate outgoing mail to take advantage of lowest rates by using mechanized and automated equipment to generate presort mail. The Navy has centralized facilities in several cities and plans to establish such facilities in other cities as well.
a. Existing sites:
(1) New Orleans, LA.
(2) Norfolk, VA.
(3) Pearl Harbor, HI.
(4) Pensacola, FL.
(5) San Diego, CA.
(6) Washington, DC.
b. Planned sites:
(1) Bremerton, WA.
(2) Charleston, SC.
(3) Jacksonville, FL.
Most Navy consolidated mail facilities do not act as a central base locator for the installation. Mail is delivered to the addressed command, and the command is responsible for performing proper directory service if the addressee is no longer at that address. Navy consolidated mail facilities generally do not perform directory service on mail.
Naval stations are different from other Department of Defense installations in that they receive fleet post office (FPO) mail for the ships assigned to that particular base. These ships can be either in port, at sea, or laid up for repairs. This mail is received from the appropriate mail processing center already containerized by ship. Letters are contained in half trays, flats are contained in sealed flat tubs, and parcels are contained in #1 sacks. This mail is delivered by the military mail center to authorized representatives of each ship in port, or is held for a ship's return to port. Daily communication is made with each processing center to ensure proper routing of mail for ships traveling between naval stations. Local postmasters/station managers should be aware of this mail's critical nature and the need to coordinate closely for its prompt transfer.
4-8 Official Mail Metering
4-8.1 General
Official mail is mail matter that contains correspondence pertaining to the official function of the installation. By Department of Defense regulations, the Department of Defense mail center is to control and meter official mail and serves as the central distribution point for all outgoing official mail. The Department of Defense mail center collects, reviews, and processes official mail, applies postage to it (either with stamps or an official postage meter), and then dispatches it to the U.S. Postal Service. Note: the Department of Defense mail center is not authorized to deposit official mail in USPS mail collection boxes.
The Department of Defense does not consider mail to be "official" until it has been postmarked by an official postage meter, or until it has had an appropriate quantity of postage stamps affixed to it, and then placed under the control of the U.S. Postal Service or its representatives. Until it is "official," it is not subject to USPS postal laws and regulations in terms of handling, security, or search and seizure considerations. Further, official mail ceases to be categorized as "mail" as soon as the U.S. Postal Service properly delivers it to the addressee or an authorized agent - at that point, it becomes correspondence or matter, and is no longer subject to USPS postal laws or regulations. At that point, it comes under the jurisdiction of the Department of Defense and is subject to the provisions of the Department of Defense Official Mail Manual.
The Department of Defense is in the process of implementing "Postage on Line," particularly for smaller installations that currently use postage stamps. This marketing initiative will allow low-volume stamp users to print the equivalent of meter strips on their own personal computer. For more information, contact your district Business Center. Postmasters/station managers should communicate with their military counterparts to determine their participation, and should be prepared to assist in the implementation of this program.
4-8.2 Air Force Centralized Mail Metering
At an Air Force base, the official mail manager supervises the Base Information Transfer System (BITS), which is the collection point for all outgoing official mail. BITS collects, reviews, and processes official mail, applies postage to it, and then dispatches it to the U.S. Postal Service. BITS can dispatch mail either by delivering it to the nearest U.S. post office, or having it picked up by the U.S. Postal Service at regularly scheduled times.
4-8.3 Naval Centralized Mail Metering
Navy consolidated mail facilities act as a collection point for all outgoing official mail. They collect outgoing official mail from all participating Department of Defense installations in the geographic area, review and process the mail, apply postage to it, and dispatch it to the U.S. Postal Service. These units are self-supporting, being run on the funds they save through presorting the mail and taking advantage of rates that are lower than the single piece rate. The military can dispatch mail either by delivering it to the nearest U.S. post office, or having it picked up by the U.S. Postal Service at regularly scheduled times.
4-9 Diagramming Mail Flows at the Department of Defense Installation
Each U.S. Postal Service manager, in conjunction with the appropriate military mail manager, should diagram the mail flows that are currently present at the military installation being served. This will provide the postal manager with specific information on military mail flows on the Department of Defense installation. It also will lead to improved communication between the USPS and the Department of Defense managers and to improved, efficient mail service.

5 Street Addressing
5-1 Introduction
Proper addressing is the key to ensuring that mail is processed in the most timely and efficient manner. Proper addressing makes possible the use of automated equipment that speeds up service, minimizes errors, and promotes good business practices. Both the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense installations benefit through the use of proper addressing. By working together, we can help ensure that all mailings have proper street addresses, that these addresses are unique and capable of being handled on automation equipment, and that all of our customers are aware of how mailings should be addressed.
Another feature of proper street addressing is that it provides a unique locator address for emergency services, identifying specific locations for providing directions, etc. The recent emphasis on "911 addressing" (i.e., having a unique address for each physical location) in the civilian community is just as critical on Department of Defense installations, because the need for definitive landmarks and points for directions exists there as well. By working together to provide unique street addressing for all buildings and facilities, these critical areas can be addressed and resolved.
The use of building numbers as address locators should be discouraged. Department of Defense generally assigns building numbers in numerical order in the order of construction of the individual buildings. Consequently, buildings that are close together might have numbers that vary greatly. When building numbers are used for announcements, directions, telephone directories, and other purposes, there is an increased reliance on memory and post familiarization. This makes new members of the community, including new postal employees, at a disadvantage and requires an intense period of memorization before familiarity is gained. This is detrimental to the efficient use of employees for delivery purposes, including package, Express Mail, and collection services. The most prominent number displayed on any building should be the address, rather than the building number.
5-2 USPS Official Publications
This handbook is a supplement to the Postal Service's Publication 28, Postal Addressing Standards. Publication 28 and the Domestic Mail Manual (DMM) contain the official USPS addressing standards and must be followed in all cases. Always use the most current editions of these documents, which are accessible on the corporate intranet at click on Information, then Policies and Procedures, then either Publications or Manuals, and then scroll to the desired document. All USPS facility managers are responsible for ensuring that current copies of these documents are available at all times. USPS copies of Publication 28 and the DMM can be obtained by submitting a request through the normal USPS supply requisition process.
Because of the complexity of addressing in different areas of the country, this handbook is not intended to be inclusive. It will provide only the basics. You might need to seek the assistance of local district personnel to resolve various situations such as unique ZIP Codes, shared ZIP Codes, grid addressing, alternate addressing, phantom or auxiliary route assignments, etc.
Department of Defense installations can obtain a free copy of Publication 28 and an order form for the DMM by calling 1-800-238-3150. These publications are also available through the Internet Web site at www.usps.com. All USPS managers of facilities serving military installations should make sure that the commanding officer and his/her staff have or know how to obtain current copies of Publication 28 and the DMM.
5-3 USPS District Support
The following USPS district staff is available to assist USPS managers and Department of Defense commands with information on addressing:
a. The manager of Address Management Systems is responsible for providing all necessary assistance in addressing for a district. This manager reports to the district manager of Operations Programs Support and is responsible for all address coding rules and policies issued by USPS Headquarters Address Management.
b. The Address Management Systems specialist is responsible for providing all necessary assistance for specific 3-digit or 5-digit ZIP Codes within a district. This person reports to the manager of Address Management Systems.
5-4 Proper Addressing
The Postal Service defines a complete address as one that has all the address elements necessary to allow an exact match with the current Postal Service ZIP+4 File and the City State File to obtain the finest level of ZIP+4 and delivery point codes for the delivery address.
The delivery address line and the last line of address on a mailpiece should be complete, standardized, and validated with the ZIP+4 File (for delivery address line) and the City State File (last line). See the example in Exhibit 5-4.
The delivery address line on a mailpiece should allow space for a minimum of 30 characters. To be compatible with the USPS National ZIP+4 database, the optimum is 64 characters.
A standardized address is one that is fully spelled out, or that is abbreviated by using the Postal Service standard abbreviations as shown in Publication 28 or in the current Postal Service ZIP+4 file.
The address block on a mailpiece specifies the location to which the mailpiece is to be delivered by either the U.S. Postal Service or the Department of Defense . All mail must bear address information that contains at least the following elements in this order from the top line:
1. Intended recipient's name or other identification.
2. Street and number. (Include apartment, suite or unit number.)
3. City and state. (The city is any acceptable mailing name shown for the 5-digit ZIP Code listed in the USPS city-state file serving the intended recipient. Currently not all Department of Defense installation names are listed as acceptable city mailing name in the city-state file. Local Address Management System offices need to be consulted to add the installation name if not currently acceptable.)
4. ZIP Code (5 digit or ZIP+4) where required. (This appears on the same line as the city and state.)


Exhibit 5-4: Proper Addressing Format
GENERAL HERMAN H HALFTRACK
(Attention Line)
HEADQUARTERS INSTALLATION GP
(Recipient Line)
123 TANK DR RM 327
(Delivery Address Line)
CAMP SWAMPY VA 20102-0123
(Last Line)

5-5 Addressing Within the United States
Mail addressed to military personnel within the United States must show the name of the military installation, the state, and the correct ZIP Code or ZIP+4 code. The following conditions also apply:
a. Mail addressed to Army personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), and organization.
b. Mail addressed to Air Force personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), organization, and box number (if served by a PSC).
c. Mail addressed to Navy and Marine Corps personnel must show full name (including first name and middle name or initial), rank or rating, and organization.
d. Mail sent to a dependant of military personnel for delivery through the sponsor's military unit must be addressed in care of the sponsor. However, if mail for a dependent is sent for delivery at the sponsor's military quarters, it need not be addressed in care of the sponsor.
Place secondary address unit designators at the end of the delivery address line. Use the proper abbreviation for apartment (APT), suite (STE), unit (UNIT), floor (FL), room (RM), department (DEPT), etc. Do not use the pound sign (#) if the correct designation is known.
The APO/FPO address format is used ONLY for overseas military address. It is not authorized for domestic military addressing. See the following section.
United States Postal Service Headquarters Address Management is to be notified by the Department of Defense of all plans to assign or convert addresses. They will be responsible for providing the proper assistance at the district post office level to acquire approval of address content and format.
5-6 Military Addresses in Overseas Locations
For overseas military addresses, the last line must contain the APO or FPO designation, the appropriate two-letter "state" abbreviation (AA, AE, or AP), and the appropriate 5-digit ZIP Code or ZIP+4 (the 3-digit ZIP Code prefix for AA is 340, for AE it is 090-098, and for AP it is 962-966). The delivery address line must show the ship name, unit number, Consolidated Mail Room (CMR) number or PSC number, and box number (if assigned). The following conditions also apply:
a. Mail addressed to Army personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), and unit number.
b. Mail addressed to Air Force personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle initial), and PSC or unit number.
c. Mail addressed to Navy and Marine Corps personnel must show rank or rating, full name (including first name and middle initial), and PSC number for shore-based units. Ship name must be used if applicable.
d. Mail sent to dependants residing in overseas areas must be addressed in care of the sponsor.
5-7 Geographic Address
Mail showing a foreign city and country in addition to the military address is considered international mail and is subject to the postage rates and conditions for international mail. This mail will not be retained with the APO/FPO systems.
5-8 Methods of Addressing
Department of Defense installations are Federal property. Department of Defense installations not having standard street addressing should be encouraged to adopt the addressing system used by adjacent communities, cities, or counties. The installation commander should assume responsibilities for implementing an address project on Department of Defense installations. City and county planning and engineering departments in many areas may be able to provide expertise since they are involved in address assignment and street naming. They may also have computer-mapping capability.
The U.S. Postal Service is not authorized and should not accept responsibility for the assignment of addresses. However, it is appropriate and proper that the U.S. Postal Service provide assistance and guidance to the installation commander and the local community during local addressing programs. Please contact Headquarters Address Management at 1-800-331-5746. They will make the appropriate contacts within the responsible district to ensure that the installation commander and the local community have the necessary information.
However, the U.S. Postal Service is responsible for working with city, county, and state officials to ensure that the address assignments are automation-compatible. It is the policy of the U.S. Postal Service not to accept any addressing system that is not compatible with our automation efforts. Consider the following conditions:
a. The use of building names or numbers is not an acceptable addressing format.
b. An official street name and numbering approval process should be established in areas where one does not exist. When assigning or approving street names, avoid duplicate or similar-sounding names, and ensure continuity with existing streets.
c. All addressing systems should be based on a simple fixed grid or fixed block numbering system that is county based. This requires close coordination with the USPS Address Management System office to ensure accurate and complete addressing is used in a postal delivery area.
d. USPS facility managers must not approve any proposed addressing system including the use of ZIP+4 Codes until it has been reviewed and approved by the district manager of Address Management Systems.
5-9 Benefits of Standardized Address Formats
Address standardization is a positive step towards address quality and is a cost-effective operation for both the postal customer and the Postal Service.
5-9.1 Benefits to Customers
Standardized address formats offer the following benefits to customers:
a. Consistent and timely delivery of mail.
b. Ease of reference when giving directions for public use.
c. Greater reliability in receiving emergency services.
d. Reduction in misreads by postal automation equipment and postal personnel.
e. Increased potential for deliverability of mail once processed.
f. Consistency of address information stored in customer files and directories.
5-9.2 Benefits to the U.S. Postal Service
Standardized address formats offer the following benefits to the U.S. Postal Service:
a. Increased efficiency in mail processing, including greater use of automated equipment.
b. Reduction in misreads by postal automation equipment and postal personnel.
c. Reduction in mail handling by postal personnel, both USPS and Department of Defense .
d. Faster and more consistent mail delivery.
e. Reduction in processing and operating costs.

6 Overview of Automation and DPS
6-1 Introduction
Automation enables the U.S. Postal Service to offer its customers better service at lower cost. Because the U.S. Postal Service is realizing sufficient volume of barcoded mail, it can now apply automation to delivery operations. Delivery Point Sequencing (DPS) is the culmination of this automation effort. Using automated machinery, DPS places a high percentage of letter mail in delivery point sequence with great accuracy. This eliminates the need for delivery personnel to hand-case high volumes of letters, and it reduces missorts and other subsequent letter-handling errors.
More than any other change ever implemented in the U.S. Postal Service, DPS requires the coordination and cooperation of every functional operation. DPS affects every facet of mail processing and delivery and also involves the resources of many administrative operations. Operational groups such as Processing and Distribution, In-Plant Support, Operations Programs Support, and Distribution Networks all have critical roles in DPS. Unions and administrative support groups such as Human Resources, Information Systems, and Finance also have integral roles in supporting DPS.
The goal of Processing and Distribution is to establish effective communications among the various groups and successfully implement DPS. The U.S. Postal Service expects this goal to be achieved through teamwork, training, and employee involvement. The experiences of delivery units that have implemented DPS thus far have proven that teamwork is vital to a successful implementation. A core group of people, augmented by functional experts as necessary, needs to be established to initiate DPS.
The successful implementation of DPS requires the resources of many functional areas. DPS implementation teams have proven effective in pulling these resources together. If teams are not already in place, formation of these teams should be requested. These teams are vital to successful DPS implementation.
6-2 Automation and DPS Implementation Teams
It is important that the district establish a coordinating body or team above the local teams. This district-level team is to be concerned with DPS implementation issues that affect more than one delivery unit. This team is to be a multi-functional group that coordinates the successful implementation of DPS and all letter automation, ensures district policies are followed, interfaces with the union, and resolves local problems between functional areas. This team could be based upon the performance cluster, district, or plant team. The senior management in the district, the district manager, and the lead plant manager decide on this team's composition. The team should include the positions listed in the following sections.
6-2.1 Manager of Operations Program Support (MOPS)
The manager of Operations Program Support and the MOPS office provides support to delivery and customer services operations. This manager ensures that delivery concerns and problems are voiced and addressed. This office is also responsible for implementing any required changes in the delivery and customer service operations.
6-2.2 Manager of In-Plant Support (MIPS)
If the team is at the performance cluster or district level, there are several managers of In-Plant Support (MIPS). One or more of these managers could serve on the team. This individual provides support for Processing and Distribution operations and ensures that plant concerns and problems are brought forth. This manager is the key person in achieving DPS mail volume targets and for supporting sort plan development and in-plant quality efforts.
6-2.3 Manager of Address Management Systems
The accuracy and maintenance of sort plans is the cornerstone of an effective DPS process. Sort plans are dependent on the quality of the address management database for accuracy. The Address Management Systems (AMS) office thus plays a key role in any effective DPS program. The manager of AMS is the key person to ensure that all address management concerns are brought forth. They work with their staffs to implement required changes in the database and to perform ongoing audits and maintenance of the database.
6-2.4 Other Key Personnel
The district office should also consider other key personnel for the DPS initiation process. Potential members include personnel from the following organizations:
a. Logistics and Transportation.
b. Maintenance.
c. Quality Improvement.
d. Labor Relations.
e. Human Resources.
6-2.5 The Local Team
The makeup of the local team follows the same pattern as the performance cluster, district, or plant team in that it should contain those people who have the ability to make decisions during the planning process at the local level and effect change during DPS implementation. The local team has the following responsibilities:
a. Coordinate the successful implementation of DPS at the delivery unit level.
b. Work with other functional areas (especially Processing and Distribution) and serve as liaison between functional areas.
c. Ensure all DPS requirements (work methods, target percentages, case configuration, etc.) are met.
d. Handle day-to-day operational issues.
e. Ensure that savings and service objectives are attained.
With these responsibilities in mind, the local DPS implementation team should include the individuals noted in the following sections.
6-2.5.1 Manager of Distribution Operations
The manager of distribution operations may not be able to attend every meeting but must be aware of the plant's performance in supporting DPS units.
6-2.5.2 Supervisor of Distribution Operations (Tours 1 and 2)
The Tour 1 individual should be the supervisor responsible for the DPS operation in the plant. His or her attendance at the local meetings allows face-to-face discussion with the DPS delivery manager for timely and accurate exchange of information. This person also provides delivery units with the quickest way to effect change in mail plants. In addition, because the delivery operation occurs on Tour 2, the Tour 2 automation supervisor should also be included. Delivery management personnel will then have a person at the plant they can talk to directly if a problem occurs. This person should work with the Tour 1 supervisor to resolve problems.
6-2.5.3 Manager of Post Office Operations
The manager of Post Office Operations (MPOO) has line authority over and oversees post offices on the level of EAS-24 or below and is a key resource in initiating DPS. Because the MPOO is directly responsible to support overall performance of all but the largest post offices, he or she must be an integral part of the entire DPS implementation process. The MPOO is invaluable in identifying problems that have surfaced in early DPS sites and in recommending courses of action that have proven successful in addressing and resolving those problems. The MPOO may not be available for every local meeting, but his or her direct participation and support is extremely valuable at the start of the process and in overcoming problems.
6-2.5.4 Postmaster, Station Branch Manager, and First-Line Delivery Supervisor
These delivery managers are in the best position to gauge the progress of the DPS process and make it successful. These individuals can observe the direct impact of DPS on their units and can monitor the process to help provide a quality product. Their observations can clarify and quantify the successful elements of the process and also identify those areas that require improvement and/or change. Delivery managers, along with plant personnel (especially from Tour 1), are the vital cogs in a successful DPS process. When a delivery unit is receiving correctly sorted DPS mail, the delivery manager for that unit is the key to making the changes at the delivery unit that result in reduced costs and improved service.
6-2.5.5 Sort Plan Developer
The sort plan developer, who usually is part of In-Plant Support, is the key to ensuring that an accurate sort plan is developed and maintained in the delivery unit. Since sort plans may require changes on a daily basis through Station Input, coordination between the sort plan developer and the DPS unit is vital.
6-2.5.6 Manager of Transportation and Networks
The time and presentation of DPS and residual (non-DPS) mail is critical to the success of the DPS process. The manager of Transportation and Networks should be involved at the earliest planning stages. This manager's role is to ensure that transportation meets the needs of the delivery unit and maximizes the window for processing by ensuring timely and adequate mailflows through the DPS processing. Experience has shown that proper and effective transportation schedules are often a key aspect in a successful DPS unit.
6-2.5.7 Other Resources
Experience demonstrates that the effective implementation of DPS requires the cooperation of many functional areas. It is strongly recommended that this team use resources from other functional areas as necessary. This might involve utilizing experienced supervisors from other units, rural QWL-EI teams, and area or national subject matter experts to resolve specific problems.
6-2.6 Customer Services Managers
A third team has also proven valuable in early DPS sites. This informal group is comprised of customer services DPS managers. They develop a network of DPS managers to share successes, problems, and solutions and to serve as mentors for managers about to enter the DPS process. For example, a unit manager may become a member of this group 3 months prior to DPS initiation and then leave 3 months after DPS implementation. Regular monthly meetings are recommended.
6-3 Automation and DPS Implementation Planning
When delivery managers plan the DPS initiation process, they need to give significant thought not only to the final objectives, but also to the steps required to get to those objectives. While the final goals are to reduce costs and improve service, achieving these goals involve factors such as the following:
a. Reaching DPS volume levels.
b. Achieving and maintaining quality thresholds.
c. Reducing office casing and strapping-out time.
d. Ensuring that any increases in city carrier street time are justified.
e. Inspecting routes to establish automation impacts.
f. Restructuring routes at both interim adjustment and final target levels.
These tasks can be accomplished only with the full cooperation of all employees - both management and craft.
The following sections discuss how to prepare for DPS implementation and manage the necessary tasks.
6-3.1 Team Plan
The first thing delivery managers need to consider in preparing for DPS is all the elements that need to be accomplished, when they need to be accomplished, and by whom. The easiest way to succeed is through the team approach outlined in 6-2. For a team to operate, it needs a good plan.
Two examples of an overall outline for a good plan appear in the DPS Implementation Guide, which was developed for successful DPS implementation. This handbook can be acquired from the area or district DPS coordinator. These plans include the items that the team needs to consider. Delivery managers should use a comprehensive plan to implement DPS.
6-3.2 Final DPS Target Percentage
Prior to selecting the DPS implementation process, delivery managers should determine their DPS target percentage. The target percentage is mutually determined by the plant and the delivery unit and should be attained within 90 days of DPS implementation at the delivery unit. The minimum target percentage should be 40 percent. When met, this target percentage triggers route adjustments. There are a number of factors to be considered in establishing this target, as explained in the following sections.
6-3.2.1 Present Letter Volumes
Delivery managers need to analyze their present letter volumes. Mail processing is an excellent resource in this analysis. Two-pass volume (sector segment) can serve as a starting point for expected levels of DPS.
6-3.2.2 Carrier Route Presort
Carrier route presort letter volumes offer an excellent opportunity to increase DPS volumes where it is cost effective. A memo detailing the standard operating procedures appears at the end of module 3 in the DPS Implementation Guide. Delivery managers should meet with processing and distribution to determine how presort letter volumes will be captured and put into DPS.
6-3.2.3 Remote Barcoding System (RBCS)
A unit that is serviced by a remote barcoding system (RBCS) site should raise its level of DPS volume. As with carrier route presort, delivery managers should meet with processing and distribution to determine the impact that RBCS might have on the unit's DPS percentage.
6-3.3 Sort Plan Maintenance
Once accurate sort plan data has been ensured, maintaining it in a current and accurate format is critical to the long-range success of DPS. Delivery managers should accomplish this by ensuring that carriers properly use and complete the Edit Book and PS Form 1621, Delivery Management Report, as outlined in Handbook M-39, Management of Delivery Services, section 128.21. Also, every day delivery managers should use Station Input, which is a tool that enables delivery managers to modify the DPS sort program. (See 6-5.)
6-4 Sort Program System (SPS)
The sort program system (SPS), a key tool in the DPS environment, is used to develop sort programs. Sort programs are used on automated equipment to put mail in delivery sequence order.
A sort program developer (who is usually a member of the In-Plant Support staff) uses SPS to generate the DPS sort program, which is then transferred to letter a mail processing barcode sorter (MPBCS) or a delivery barcode sorter (DBCS).
Successful implementation of DPS requires that the sort program be 100 percent accurate. The Address Management Systems (AMS), the sort program developer, and the delivery unit must communicate efficiently to ensure the accuracy of the sort program.
The AMS staff can assist delivery managers in the process of assessing the accuracy of the address file data. Delivery managers must ensure that the address file data is correct before generating DPS sort plans.
Communication and cooperation between the delivery manager and the sort program developer is a key to success with DPS. Before the sort program developer creates the actual sort program, he or she should consult with the delivery manager to determine holdout needs. Prior to starting DPS, it is critical that the delivery unit manager and the sort plan developer meet to establish the following:
a. A password for the delivery unit manager to access Station Input.
b. A schedule for when to conduct Station Input.
c. A time of day when sort plans are to be updated.
d. What 5-digit zones the delivery unit manager will have access to during Station Input.
6-5 Station Input
6-5.1 Overview
Station Input is a tool that enables delivery managers to modify the DPS sort program. Using Station Input will help manage the quality of the DPS sortation and the efficiency of the unit's delivery operation.
Appendix E of the DPS Implementation Guide explains the procedures for using Station Input and making changes to the DPS sort program.
6-5.2 Using Station Input to Eliminate Sortation Errors
Station Input can be a valuable tool for quickly attaining the 98 percent quality threshold required by our Memorandum of Understanding with the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC). Using Station Input, delivery managers can remove from the DPS sort program addresses that present sequencing problems. The mail for those addresses can be separated from the DPS letter mail and directed to the carrier's case for manual handling.
Problem addresses can be identified using CLASS reports, the DPS validation procedure, the Sequence of Segments report, or through the quality tests conducted after the unit begins to receive DPS mail. Further information on these reports and procedures can be obtained from the manager of Address Management Systems (AMS).
Keep in mind that the decision to take an address out of the DPS Station Input will remove mail from the DPS mailstream. Therefore, excessive use of Station Input to remove addresses from the DPS mailstream will lower the ability to meet the DPS target percentage.
To help DPS perform most efficiently, delivery managers should try to identify and correct problems that cause addresses to have sequencing difficulties. Solutions can range from changing sector segments or addresses to installing centralized delivery.
6-5.3 Using Station Input for Efficiency
Station Input can also be an effective tool to make short-term "tweaks" to the DPS sort program to enhance the efficiency of the unit's delivery operation.
When using Station Input for these purposes, delivery managers should consider the cost associated with collecting Station lnput data and entering it into the system. Some units have found the cost of using Station Input outweighs the benefits derived if care is not taken to manage the process.
Delivery managers should use Station Input to modify the sort plan or divert mail from the DPS mailstream only in response to short-term changes in operational requirements and only when using it can demonstrate a tangible workhour or service benefit.
Delivery managers may also use Station Input for other short-term changes in the DPS sort plans for the unit. With Station Input, delivery managers can change the sequencing order within the sort program to accommodate temporary changes in the order of delivery on a route. Delivery managers can also use Station Input to separate from the DPS mailstream mail for addresses with caller service or business reply mail.
6-5.4 Managing Station Input
The information that delivery managers will need for Station Input comes from two sources - from the carriers, and from analyses of the units address file or DPS mailstream. Delivery managers should establish formal procedures for carriers to request changes to the sort program. The procedures should include a cutoff time for submitting requests, with the cutoff time associated with the unit's scheduled time for conducting Station Input on the computer.
The unit supervisor should evaluate any requests for sort plan changes, and, if necessary, discuss them with the carrier. Once approved, delivery managers should make the changes using Station Input according to the schedule set through the plant's in-plant support staff.
6-6 Plant Impact
6-6.1 Key Factors
Based upon communications with the delivery unit, the plant will make changes to the mail arrival profile and develop a new standard operating procedure (SOP) during the planning process. To have an efficient operation and to capture projected savings, delivery managers must ensure that a commitment between the delivery unit and the plant covers the unit's needs. Some key factors that need to be included are discussed in the following sections.
6-6.1.1 Non-DPS
The following procedures should be used with non-DPS mail:
a. Flats, first-pass rejects, and mail that cannot be automated should arrive as early as possible and on the agreed-upon transportation.
b. Trays should be labeled to facilitate distribution and volume recording.
c. Procedures should be in place to record and distribute mail efficiently and accurately.
d. All residual mail should be sorted to the carrier route level.
e. Residual mail volume on the final trip should be minimal (hot case mail only).
6-6.1.2 DPS
The following procedures should be used with DPS mail:
a. DPS mail should be run every day.
b. DPS volumes should meet the commitment levels. Experience has shown that DPS volumes may fluctuate from day to day but do not usually fluctuate from one Monday to the next Monday, from one Tuesday to the next Tuesday, etc.
c. DPS mail should come consolidated, properly labeled, and ready for street delivery.
d. Mail should be sorted as per the most recent sort plan.
e. Mail on the last trip should be minimal (hot case mail only).
f. The quality within the DPS mailstream should be 98 percent or higher (i.e., it should meet or exceed the quality threshold).
g. Marker cards should run properly.
h. Transportation should meet the needs of the delivery unit.
6-6.2 Delivery Manager's Responsibility
The delivery manager is responsible for identifying these factors and seeking solutions with processing and distribution. To accomplish these responsibilities, delivery managers need to understand what information they need to collect and in what format it should be presented. During the planning process, delivery managers should review these issues and should know exactly what data is necessary to identify and resolve problems. Delivery managers should develop a structured list so that they can train carriers to bring to their attention any problems that negatively affect the ability to capture DPS savings.
Delivery managers must establish a daily feedback mechanism with the plant to both identity and resolve problems. They should appoint two specific people for this purpose so that they can become familiar with their functional counterparts. These people should meet one another and visit the other's site early in the process to understand the concerns of each group. See end of module 2 of the DPS Implementation Guide for an example of a list of points of contact.
It is very important that delivery managers and the plant agree on key factors affecting DPS and that they do their part to achieve success in each key factor. Both the plant and delivery managers should track the progress of each key factor in achieving success.
6-6.3 Transportation
Many early DPS sites made the mistake of trying to fit the DPS process into their current transportation schedules even though those schedules did not meet the needs of the plant or the delivery unit.
During the planning process, delivery managers should thoroughly review and analyze transportation schedules to ensure that they optimize the operational requirements of both parties. They should include the transportation manager in discussions with the plant. Upon implementing DPS, they should monitor transportation schedules to ensure that they meet the unit's needs. If transportation schedules are not effective, delivery managers must do the following:
a. Document problems and their impact on the unit.
b. Contact the plant to discuss these problems.
c. Analyze problems and discuss solutions.
d. Redefine requirements and make adjustments.
e. Continue to monitor transportation schedules to ensure their effectiveness.
6-7 Management and Union Involvement
6-7.1 Overview
As it is with the operational groups, teamwork is also necessary for the carriers and union officials in a delivery unit. The 1992 arbitration award outlined in the USPS-NALC Joint Training Guide, "Building Our Future by Working Together," based on the September 1992 Memorandums of Understanding (MOU), contains guidelines and parameters for working with the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) and the carriers. Every manager must become familiar with this document, with the 80 questions and answers jointly published related to the MOUs, and the current editions of Handbook M-39, Management of Delivery Services, and Handbook M-41, City Delivery Carriers Duties and Responsibilities. These documents contain guidance on elements such as:
a. Unilateral or X-Route implementation process.
b. Work methods.
c. Target percentages.
d. Casing configurations.
e. Adjustment procedures.
In addition, delivery managers must become familiar with the March 10, 1994, DPS implementation strategies and, if they have rural routes, with the DPS Implementation Procedures for Rural Routes. This handbook can be acquired from the area or district DPS coordinator. (Please note that, although DPS implementation is similar for rural routes and city carrier routes, there are important differences.)
Prior to DPS implementation, the manager of Operations Programs Support (or designee) should conduct for the delivery managers involved a briefing session on the MOUs, strategies, implementation guidelines, and the plant/delivery unit relationship and how they affect the decisions that delivery unit managers must make.
Note: The guidelines in the DPS Implementation Guide require the input of the local union but do not abdicate management's rights or responsibilities for the efficient implementation of DPS and for managing DPS operations. Decisions, whether made unilaterally or jointly in conjunction with the local parties as prescribed by the MOUs, should be made based on service, efficiency, and the needs of the delivery unit.
6-7.2 Employee Communication and Training
It is important for delivery managers to inform carriers of changes that will result from DPS before implementation. Most of these impacts are contained in the Delivery Point Sequencing Joint Training for city letter carriers that was developed by the NALC and the U.S. Postal Service. (This training should be given to every city letter carrier prior to DPS implementation, and it is mandatory before taking DPS mail directly to the street without casing.) Changes such as those in schedules, sort plans, work methods, and procedures for taking mail directly to the street should be discussed before DPS is implemented. Delivery managers should also keep carriers informed of DPS-related changes during and after the implementation when the changes will affect their daily operations.
6-7.3 Communication Link
Delivery managers must establish and maintain a feedback mechanism with the plant and other support groups. The daily flow of information throughout the implementation process is critical to the success of DPS. Every functional group must be aware of how this communication link works and use it. A point of-contact for each group should be designated on a feedback list. The list of contacts should specify whom to contact to plan, coordinate, and resolve problems.

7 Growth Management
7-1 Overview and Introduction
7-1.1 Overview
The U.S. Postal Service must manage growth to control costs. The 1995 Cost of Delivery Study shows a significant difference in annual cost between door, curb, and centralized delivery, as shown in Exhibit 7-1.1: The costs shown are per delivery, and include vehicle, personnel, and equipment costs.
Exhibit 7-1.1: Annual Delivery Cost
Door
$243
Curb
$154
Centralized (NDCBU)
$106

When delivery growth occurs, local management is responsible for achieving the lowest possible cost commensurate with providing prompt, efficient service.
This chapter provides material extracted from Central Delivery Guidelines, which the Office of Delivery produces and provides to districts and to offices having 10 or more city routes. It provides information on managing delivery growth and on centralized delivery. (The heading numbering that appears in the rest of this handbook has been added to the extracted material.)
Many Department of Defense installations provide neighborhood delivery and collection box units (NDCBUs) and other centralized delivery equipment for family housing areas, dormitories, and barracks. Due to turnover in military personnel, the installation might not have an individual who has knowledge about maintenance procedures for centralized delivery equipment. The USPS postmaster/station manager should provide this information to military representatives for their use in maintaining their equipment and ensuring that they meet postal standards.
For further information on managing delivery growth and on centralized delivery, or to acquire a copy of the Central Delivery Guidelines, contact your district Operations Programs Support manager. The district office has a staff of delivery professionals to help answer questions, resolve problems, and act as a resource for each post office in the district. Do not hesitate to involve them in improving operations in your office.
7-1.2 Introduction
A part of Growth Management includes how the Postal Service provides and offers delivery service to new residences and businesses. To "manage" growth means to take a proactive stance. We can influence the choices made by customers concerning available delivery options.
Why do we care what type of delivery a new block, street, neighborhood or office complex chooses? What impact do new deliveries have on delivery operations?
The Postal Service, just like any other business, must look at ways to operate more efficiently, while keeping costs at a minimum. Many other companies have entered the delivery field in the last few years with overnight mail, and parcel post. We find ourselves in a competitive marketplace, and must devise new methods for moving the mail more efficiently.
Everyone benefits, the customer is given a locked, convenient mail receptacle, and the carrier can deliver mail faster on the street, is not exposed to many safety hazards, and does not have to carry pounds of mail on his or her back.
Each year new delivery addresses are added to city and rural routes across the nation. The most obvious major impact on the Postal Service is the cost of providing delivery to the new addresses.
Average annual cost per delivery has been developed for each mode. The latest estimates of those costs are:
* Door Delivery: $243 per delivery per year.
* Curbside Delivery: $154 per delivery per year.
* Cluster Box: $106 per delivery per year.
* Other Central: $110 per delivery per year.
Clearly, the cost difference between curbline and centralized delivery is significant.
There is a need to expand upon the various centralized delivery concepts to ensure that most new deliveries are serviced through a minimum number of delivery points. We need to continue to emphasize centralized delivery for all new deliveries if we expect central delivery to become the dominant mode of delivery and for the Postal Service to achieve significant cost avoidance.
The objectives for centralized delivery are:
* To implement centralized delivery in appropriate new communities, new developments, and new extensions of delivery, whether served by city, rural or highway contract delivery.
* In existing delivery areas, convert to centralized delivery wherever customers agree and it is cost beneficial to the Postal Service.
Centralized delivery must be managed very carefully during the short-term in order to protect the significant cost avoidance opportunities it presents.
For safety reasons, and uniformity of operating procedures, most policies are set by Headquarters. It would be very confusing to the customer to obtain different answers to the same questions, depending on where they live. If every manager had their own "policy," chaos would reign.
Cluster Box Unit Specifications


Type I
For high mail volume areas - 13 customer compartments, one parcel compartment and one large outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 4 3/4" high and 15" deep. The parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 7/8" high and 15" deep.
Type II
12 customer compartments, one parcel compartment and one standard outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 3" high and 15" deep. Parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 7/8" high and 15" deep.
Type III
16 customer compartments, one standard and one large parcel compartment and one standard outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 3" high and 15" deep. Large parcel compartment is 12" wide, 13 3/8" high and 15" deep. The standard parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 718" high and 15" deep.


7-2 Postal Service Policies
7-2.1 General
The policy for establishing or extending delivery service is found in Section 641 and 651 of the Postal Operations Manual and the Deposit, Collection & Delivery Module of the Domestic Mail Manual. Included in this section is an easy to use matrix that defines delivery areas and the mode of service that can be provided.
7-2.1.1 Delivery Options
The delivery options now offered by the Postal Service for mail delivery are:
a. Residential (see Note below):
1. Centralized.
2. Curbside.
3. Sidewalk (must meet specific guidelines).
b. Business:
1. Centralized.
2. Curbside.
3. Door (must meet specific guidelines).
c. Apartments - centralized only.
Note: The Postal Service no longer offers door delivery as a new delivery option in residential areas. Door delivery is still available in limited situations such as "fill in" deliveries or in hardship cases.
Inconsistency in enforcing the policy and explaining these options causes many problems, and adds to the confusion experienced by builders and developers who frequently work in different parts of the country. For these reasons, you must ensure that your customers are advised of our policy and all of their options for delivery. When centralized delivery is selected, a Mode of Delivery Fact Sheet, or similar document must be completed, signed by the customer(s) and retained in the delivery unit. This serves as our documentation that the customer accepts the mode of delivery provided.
7-2.1.2 Agreements
An agreement, which may include some form of legal entitlement to the property where the central delivery equipment is located, should be signed by a Postal Service manager and the owner or developer of the new development. This document must include certification that the customer has been advised of all options for delivery. (Use the Mode of Delivery Fact Sheet or similar document.)
When we are successful in implementing or converting to centralized delivery, the original signed agreements, petitions, or plat maps should be maintained for at least five years, beyond the completion of the development, in office files.
7-2.1.3 Providing Equipment
Current Postal Service policy provides that we may purchase, install and maintain centralized delivery equipment on city, rural, and highway contract routes for residential, business deliveries, and deliveries on military installations. The Postal Service does not provide equipment for new deliveries to apartments, hotels or motels, or colleges and universities.
Refer to the Delivery Policy Matrix in this section to determine which areas have options for delivery and whether the USPS provides centralized delivery equipment in those areas. While we have the option of providing delivery equipment in those areas listed on the chart, our primary purpose is not to provide the equipment but to promote the concept of centralized delivery.
The approved types of equipment are CBU's/NDCBU's, post office boxes, and curbside mail receptacles where appropriate. Parcel lockers should also be used where needed. The Postal Service does not purchase apartment type receptacles. If existing equipment, originally installed by the USPS requires repairs, we can purchase replacement parts as necessary. If the mail receptacles are outdated and will not accommodate daily mail volume, then approved types of delivery equipment may be installed if the customer will not replace older apartment receptacles.
It would be to our advantage to obtain control of the sites where our central delivery equipment is located. It is strongly advised to obtain some form of legal entitlement to the real estate where the boxes are located. Contact your Chief Field Counsel for assistance.
7-2.1.4 Purchasing and Deployment Policies
CBU's/NDCBU's and parcel lockers may now be purchased in lots greater than 100. Contact your Purchasing Service Center for further information.
Records and locations of central delivery equipment must be maintained by the ordering post office. Spare parts inventories should be established and controlled by the office that performs the maintenance.
When placing central delivery equipment in state or national historic districts, concurrence should be obtained as early as possible from the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) and the local District Historic Advisory Board (DHAB). We are required by Presidential Order to maintain the integrity of National Historic Districts. At times, this makes it necessary to "dress up" the equipment, or make minor changes in the location of the units.
7-2.1.5 Parcel Lockers
As a practical matter, the U.S. Postal Service should procure and install parcel lockers in appropriate areas where there is sufficient operational or customer justification. These areas include:
* Postal Retail Locations
* Business Deliveries
* Residential Deliveries
Innovative uses for parcel lockers should be considered. Generally, the normal parcel volume must justify equipment purchase and installation. Local postal managers are responsible for determining the need for parcel locker equipment.
7-2.2 Miscellaneous Policies and Procedures
7-2.2.1 Maintenance
Each post office must establish and maintain an effective maintenance pro- gram to reduce costs and frequency of replacing equipment.
While the Postal Service may assume the responsibility for installation and maintenance of central delivery equipment, it normally will not be responsible for keeping approaches to units clear of obstructions. If there is a residents association that is responsible for maintenance activities within the development, it should also maintain the mailboxes.
Every effort should be made to have residents accept responsibility for maintaining the equipment to the extent practicable. If however, there is no central organization available, the Postal Service must assume the responsibility for maintenance, repair, grounds keeping, snow removal, etc. Each office must conduct a semi-annual inspection of all central delivery equipment owned by the Postal Service.
These procedures are outlined in the Safety section of the Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-2.2.2 Keys
Normally, all customer compartment keys for CBU's/NDCBU's, will be issued to the customer. The customer should be told that the Postal Service does not maintain spare keys and if all keys to the compartment are lost, the lock will have to be changed at their expense (see page 3-5 of the Central Delivery Guidelines for specific instructions).
In installations where post office box equipment is used, USPS must maintain keys and is responsible for replacing lost keys. Customers are not required to leave a deposit for keys.
7-2.2.3 Locks
Locks are normally changed when a customer moves. An adequate inventory of locks and cams can be obtained from the Materiel Distribution Center.
7-2.2.4 Conversions
It is the policy of the Postal Service to convert existing deliveries to centralized delivery when requested by the owners, managers, or residents of privately owned residences or the management of a building or development, if it is cost beneficial to the Postal Service. In addition, where there are problems with safety, mail security or mailbox vandalism, the Postal Service may offer centralized delivery as a means of addressing the problem.
All persons residing in single family detached houses where there is no management association and most individuals own their residence must agree in writing to any change in their delivery. Customers who do not agree with the change must be allowed to retain their mode of delivery. Local managers must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of converting less than 100% of the deliveries to be served.
When converting a delivery area, local management must ensure that all old mail receptacles are removed to avoid placing mail in unused mailboxes.
USPS may, if cost beneficial, provide the delivery equipment for any existing delivery area that wishes to convert from another mode of delivery. Service must have been extended to the total delivery area for at least one year. Managers should encourage those areas that wish to convert to purchase the delivery equipment. Our primary purpose is to promote the concept of centralized delivery and greater savings are achieved when the customers provide the delivery equipment. Refer to the section regarding conversions for more detailed information.
To maintain the Integrity of the ZIP+ 4 program, input from AMS is recommended as a part of the conversion process.
For additional and detailed information on Postal Service Delivery Policy, please see Conditions of Delivery in DMM D042 and POM Chapter 6.
7-3 Planning
This section contains basic elements of planning activities and suggested sources to contact for information about potential growth in your area. Also included in this section:
* Analysis Forms (City and Rural)
* Customer Profile Sheet
* Individual Project Checklist (2)
* Central Delivery Agreement Letter
* Example of proposed equipment locations an project map
* Sample reports of new construction
* PS Form 697, Extension of City Delivery Service
* PS Form 4003, Official Rural Route Description
7-3.1 Effective Planning for Growth
This is the subject that offers much overlooked potential for savings by all managers in the Postal Service. By knowing what is being planned in your delivery area, you are able to make many decisions that will further your ability to effectively manage your unit.
Will the growth be in city deliveries, rural route, or HCR? Do you need additional contract stations in the area? Will the present complement of distribution clerks need to be adjusted? How many more carriers will be needed to handle the new growth? Where should auxiliary routes be located? How many more carrier cases will be needed? Will a carrier annex suffice, or do we need a full service unit? How much room will be needed for carrier cases and related delivery equipment? How much employee parking? Customer parking? Lobby space?
The questions could go on, ad infinitum; but the point is this: By knowing where your growth areas are, and what is planned to be built in these areas, you are better able to answer all of the above questions, and many more.
Whatever your plan is, it should be comprehensive enough so that no important area in the overall program is left to chance, and yet flexible enough to allow for variances that will occur from time to time.
Also, a plan that will work well in one office may be somewhat different from another considering the difference in their respective areas. Failure to establish your own plan is apt to result in a fragmented program that will not take advantage of the cost-effective benefits available.
7-3.2 Where Does One Begin? Who Do l Contact?
Mail service is an integral part of any community and must be given proper consideration during the planning stages. In the past, owners, builders, and developers have assumed that postal services would be provided as a matter of course. However, advance planning for postal services is as important as the planning for any other service. Postal managers must anticipate the service needs of new communities, new housing developments, and older communities which do not have delivery service, and plan delivery systems with community growth in mind. It is almost impossible to begin too early to sell centralized delivery.
Obviously, when we come into the picture late, decisions have been made that may have to be changed; or worse, we cannot select and locate equipment that will function to everyone's advantage.
This is especially true in office buildings where available space is restricted to begin with, and an architect is reluctant to have to alter the building plans.
Space requirements should be discussed in the initial planning phase.
Residential developers need to know where central delivery points will be located so the locations can be included in the landscape plans. Site locations in single family home developments must be selected early, and such information made available to the developer so his sales people can inform prospective home buyers just where the mail receptacles will be located.
That leads to the question, "How do you find out what construction will occur before it occurs?" The best sources normally are:
1. Carriers. They see what is happening every day in their area. This includes seeing when a tract of land is sold or is being prepared for building and development. Encourage them to tell you what is happening and assure them that growth management will not result in their route becoming overburdened.
2. Street observations by manager's and supervisors. This is not limited to the local unit delivery supervisor. Station managers and other delivery managers should assist.
3. Local newspapers and magazines for articles on planned developments.
4. Obtain information from area and local planning authorities. These agencies often will send minutes of their official meetings on request.
5. Meet and communicate regularly with local builders and contractors.
6. Communicate with local utility companies such as gas/electric, water/sewer or telephone companies.
All the foregoing is useless if we don't respond promptly and positively. We cannot sit back and expect the public to keep us informed. To not keep up on matters that vitally affect our operation for years to come is to miss the boat. Those from whom we expect cooperation will appreciate it when we are ready with sound solutions to the problem of planning for good mail service.
7-3.3 Get Organized!
Effective planning includes organization. Set up some office files for each project. Growth management files should be kept current and in a location that is known to all supervisors assigned to the unit. Several supervisors may pass through an office before a project reaches completion. It is vital that each incoming supervisor be informed of the location and status of each ongoing project. These files should contain as a minimum, the following:
1. Project Checklist.
2. Made of Delivery Fact Sheet/Signed agreement.
3. Plat mat, site map or sketch or building plans.
4. PS Form 1621, Delivery Management Report.
5. Cost Comparison Analysis.
6. Diagrams.
7. PS Form 7381, Requisition for Supplies, Services, or Equipment, if required.
8. PS Forms 697, 4027, and 4003 where applicable.
9. Maintenance work orders.
7-3.3.1 Project Checklist
A project checklist should include a variety of activities required to implement centralized delivery.
7-3.3.2 Made of Delivery Fact Sheet/ Signed Agreement
This document is required when the developer/owner agrees to a centralized mode of delivery. The agreement must include statements from the owner or developer that appropriate delivery options were explained and that the option selected was voluntary. Signatures of both the developer and the USPS representative are required. Provide the developer with a copy of this agreement.
7-3.3.3 Plat Map, Site Map or Sketch
Obtain a plat or site map from the developer/owner. Mark or block off each area to be served and show where the equipment is to be installed. The developer and USPS representative should mutually agree upon sites. The USPS is to make the final determination where centralized equipment will be located.
7-3.3.4 PS Form 1621
A PS Form 1621 should be completed as part of the file. Refer to AMS section for more detailed explanation.
7-3.3.5 Cost Comparison
Complete and include in files, an estimate of cost comparison for either city or rural delivery as necessary.
7-3.3.6 Diagrams
A diagram of each CBU/NDCBU must be completed. These diagrams should be submitted to AMS along with PS Form 1621.
7-3.3.7 PS Form 7381
Complete this form, if required, 30-60 days prior to expected installation date.
7-3.3.8 PS Forms 697, 4027 and 4003
These forms document whether the delivery area qualifies for an extension of city or rural delivery.
7-3.3.9 Maintenance Work Orders
Any orders required for preparation and installation of equipment.
7-3.4 What About the Cost?
While a capital investment cost benefit analysis is not required, it is required that you compare the projected cost of central delivery to the type of delivery that the territory would qualify for if central delivery was not installed. Such a cost comparison is necessary to support a management decision to purchase and install the equipment.
The cost for repair and replacement parts for the first year should be 5 percent of the purchase price of the units in this procurement. However, if practical experience with equipment repairs in your locality or special local circumstances support a higher or lower estimate than as indicated above, that cost estimate should be stated on the worksheet.
In preparing cost comparisons and in deciding whether to purchase and install equipment, you may prepare the comparison either on the basis of the equipment to be installed to meet present delivery needs or, in the case of housing developments which have not been completed, on the basis of the equipment to be installed to meet the needs of the entire development when it is completed.
Unfortunately, the realization of savings from centralizing deliveries is neither guaranteed nor automatic. Offices that install CBU's/NDCBU's or other approved centralized equipment without close supervision and monitoring of carrier workhours lose much of the potential savings.
If a number of units are installed on a route previously classified overburdened, the result should be an increase in productivity for that carrier and the avoidance of extra hours previously spent. If centralized delivery is installed in a new office building on an auxiliary route, the unit managers should determine how much time the new deliveries should take. Carriers assigned to these routes should be informed of these expectations and held to those expectations.
Even where individual segmentation of CBU's/NDCBU's or rotary units is not possible from mail processing, productivity increases may occur by avoiding individual address casing and routing in the office. Flats can basically be routed or undergo the final sort on the street at the centralized unit.
7-3.4.1 How Much Savings Can I Expect?
It is necessary for the local office to determine that curb and/or centralized delivery will be cost effective in each location. A local record should be maintained to support this management determination. The following are examples of hypothetical situations for city delivery.
7-3.4.1.1 Example 1: Curbline Versus Centralized Delivery
A subdivision containing 200 total possible deliveries will soon be completed. What would, be the computed savings with centralized delivery?
The current annual average cost for curb delivery is $154 and $106 for NDCBU delivery. Current figures should be used in all cost analyses.
Cost of curbline 200 deliveries x 154 = $30,800
Cost of NDCBU 200 deliveries* x 106 = $21,200
Difference = Annual Savings = $9,600
*Cost includes cost, maintenance and installation of delivery equipment.
7-3.4.1.2 Example 2: Door-to-Door Versus Centralized
A multi-floor business building (10 floors) or a shopping mall with a total of 100 possible deliveries is still in the planning stage. The architect has called you for information on delivery methods. What would be the annual savings realized for the Postal Service in using centralized delivery for this building?
Cost of door-to-door 100 x 243 = $24,300
Cost of centralized* 100 x110 = $11,000
Difference = Annual Savings = $13,300
7-3.4.2 Is There a Difference on Rural Routes?
In developing this cost analysis, remember that a rural route is given a one minute credit for each centralized box plus a dismount and walking distance time allowance (if the carrier dismounts). The box allowance used in the cost comparison for regular rural mailboxes (curbside receptacles) is 2 minutes per box per week. Your cost comparison should be the current box allowance for regular rural mail receptacles versus the time allotted if centralized delivery was installed.
Note: When a rural route is classified as an "L" route, use 1.64 minutes per week as the rural regular box time allowance.
The manner in which rural carriers are compensated makes It easier to control the impact of growth. It is obviously more beneficial to extend new delivery through centralized boxes rather than regular receptacles. It is also possible to offset the impact of new growth through conversion from regular boxes to centralized deliveries. Delivery through centralized boxes reduces the need to adjust routes and lessens the need to create new routes.
7-3.4.3 Is There Anything Else to Consider?
In computing cost comparisons, keep in mind the total picture. Every situation will have its unique circumstances but some questions to answer that affect cost comparisons are:
1. How will delivery of accountables be affected?
2. How will parcels be delivered?
3. Who will maintain the equipment?
4. Can you convince the customer to provide/purchase receptacles?
5. Can you convince the customer to install the equipment?
6. What can you do in guaranteeing delivery time in return for centralized delivery?
7. What other features can you offer as incentive to select centralized delivery? (i.e., parcel lockers; self- service equipment; specific delivery time; earlier delivery, etc.)
7-3.5 Site Selection
Discuss with the developer location of units for mutual benefit. Select sites for equipment installation that can be safely served by the carrier and used by the customer. Safety and convenience to the customer must be a priority. Plan to assign all compartments in each unit, keeping in mind, however, that no customer should be required to walk more than one block to the CBU/NDCBU site (unless a delivery center is erected and all residents must go to one location to pick up their mail). Each location must have a designated collection compartment for outgoing mail.
Consider locations that maintain compatibility with the landscape, homes, and traffic pattern. Sites should be close to the curb in locations where the units are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles. Where possible, locate the CBU's/NDCBU's so that utilities will not have to be relocated and where access to underground cables, etc., is not unnecessarily restricted.
1. Draw the delivery pattern on the plat map.
2. Start at the entrance of the development and mark tentative unit locations and designate the area each is to serve.
3. Consider the area's growth potential. Plan for the maximum number of deliveries possible at each location. A thorough consideration at this stage will minimize later alterations.
4. If possible, place each unit between the sidewalk and the curb. If there are no sidewalks, units should be located where they are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles.
5. The unit must face away from the street or set back far enough so customers stand on the sidewalk or grass, not in the street.
7-3.5.1 Security
1. Wherever possible, locate CBU's/NDCBU's near streetlights or other night lights to ensure maximum visibility after dark.
2. Avoid locating units in secluded, darkened, and enclosed areas out of public view that could provide cover for vandalism.
3. Avoid placing them near growing shrubbery, trees or other plants that may eventually obscure their visibility.
7-3.5.2 When to Request Delivery and Installation of Equipment
Common sense prevails. The ideal is to get them installed before people start moving in. If possible, it is also very beneficial to get them installed before lots are sold. This results in far fewer customer complaints if they are already aware of the type of mail delivery designated for their neighborhood.
7-3.5.2.1 Factors to Consider
Is the street access clear of vehicles, equipment and materials?
1. Are streets in?
2. Is installation point free of dirt piles and debris?
3. Is the developer ready for installation? (They will normally let us know.) Headquarters policy is that we install centralized delivery equipment as soon as possible ... however if we know that a development is being delayed or there will be a great deal of time before construction begins, it may be wise to delay installation until a more appropriate time.
7-3.5.2.2 Other Factors to Consider
1. ZIP+ 4 - Will the grouping split codes?
2. CRIS - Will grouping cause split scheme items?
3. Will the groupings restrict the ability to adjust routes without causing split scheme items? Will they tie several CBU's/NDCBU's together?
4. Will the placement improve the carrier's line of travel? Provide the minimum number of stops? Backtracks?
5. Will the placement have an adverse visual impact on the homes in the area?
6. Does the placement and grouping of the addresses provide the customer with a convenient location for mail delivery?
7. Is the location safe for the carrier and customer, considering vehicle traffic on the street? Pedestrian traffic? Street lighting? Is there potential for vandalism to USPS equipment?
8. Does the proposed location or address grouping violate any agreements made with the developer? With City or County Planning? Public Works?
7-4 Installation
7-4.1 Overview
This section contains helpful Information for installation of central delivery equipment. The material addresses:
* When and where to install equipment
* Discussion of types of equipment
* Prepping equipment
* Locks and keys
Cluster Box Unit (Type I)
Parcel Locker and NDCBU

The Cluster Box Unit (CBU), which has replaced the NDCBU, has customer compartments 3" high, 12" wide, and 15" deep on the two normal mail volume units (12 customer compartments in the Type 11 CBU and 16 in the Type III). The 13 customer compartments on the high mail volume unit (Type 1) are each 4 3/4" high, 12" wide and 15" deep. All CBU's will include a dedicated, nonconvertible, outgoing mail compartment and one or two parcel lockers.
The units are front loading. They can be mounted flush against a wall or even built into a wall. This feature, along with the wider compartments, is particularly important in commercial applications.
The NDCBU is designed for outdoor use for either commercial or residential mail delivery. The NDCBU is available in three sizes: eight, twelve, and sixteen compartments. Each compartment size is 6" wide, 5" high, and 15" deep. Units also have one compartment designated for out-going mail.
Another piece of equipment that is available for use with NDCBU's is the parcel locker. This unit can be installed next to each NDCBU and can accommodate two parcels, per day. Each parcel locker compartment Is 13" wide, 15" high and 22" deep.
These units are installed on concrete pads facing away from the street. The pad is usually placed directly behind the sidewalk. See the Maintenance Section of the Central Delivery Guidelines for specific instructions for installing concrete pads.
7-4.2 Installation and Deployment
7-4.2.1 Overview
Postal owned delivery equipment should be installed at appropriate locations throughout a development or neighborhood. The installation of postal owned equipment is not applicable to apartment complexes where owners, builders or developers are obligated to provide receptacles in accordance with the Domestic Mail Manual (DMM) D042.9.7 and Postal Operations Manual (POM) 632.6, Apartment House Receptacles.
7-4.2.2 Criteria for Installation
To help assure maximum customer acceptance of centralized equipment postal managers must:
a. Keep informed about community growth and determine the effects on Postal Service requirements. Contact owners, builders and developers early in the planning stages to ensure that the most cost effective delivery service is provided.
b. As with any type of delivery, all requirements must be met before a community can qualify for centralized delivery service. In new city de- livery developments where centralized delivery is being implemented, the 50% improved criteria for the building lots can be waived and service can be started much sooner (see POM 642).
c. Before contacting an owner, builder, or developer, be prepared to answer these types of questions:
1. What type of service will be provided? - answer: give policy and all options for delivery.
2. What types of equipment will be required? - answer: apartment boxes, 2900 series PO boxes, CBU's/NDCBU's,
3. What type of equipment will the USPS provide? - answer: 2900 series PO boxes, CBU's/NDCBU's, Parcel Lockers, collection equipment, vending equipment, etc.
4. What is required of the owner, builder, or developer?
5. What does centralized delivery equipment look like? (Have pictures and literature available.)
6. Who will install the equipment and when? (Negotiable - Builder, USPS, Contractor)
7. Who will maintain the equipment? (Negotiable - Home-owners Association, Management Company, USPS)
8. What is the incidence of mailbox vandalism in the surrounding area? Check with Inspection Service, if necessary. Where high vandalism rates are found, remind the builder that individual locked receptacles provide better security.
d. Installation of central delivery equipment should be made before the first customers move in. This will avoid inconvenience to initial customers and once the units are in place in a development, they will be more readily acceptable to the newly arriving customers.
e. Contact owners, builders, developers or local government authorities for clearance or approval to install delivery equipment. If you have difficulty obtaining this approval, contact the District for assistance.
f. Select locations for equipment installations that can be safely served by the carrier, and used by the customer, and that maintain compatibility with the landscape, homes, and traffic pattern.
1. Sites should be close to the curb in locations where the units are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles. Where possible, locate the centralized delivery equipment so that utilities will not need to be relocated and where access to underground cables, etc., is not unnecessarily restricted. The carrier door should face the street and the customer doors should face the sidewalk side of the unit. Customers should not stand in the street to retrieve mail. CBU's are front loading and should face the sidewalk or be set back far enough so the customer stands off the curb or street.
2. Where possible try to group the boxes to serve enough deliveries at each location to justify parcel lockers. In business applications, parcel lockers should be included regardless of the number of deliveries. All CBUs include at least one parcel locker.
3. Plan to assign all compartments in each unit keeping in mind, how- ever, that no customer should be required to walk more than one block to the centralized delivery site, unless a delivery center is erected and all residents must go to one location to pick up their mail. Keep in mind that some developments lend themselves to central delivery more than others. If a group of single family attached homes (townhouses) has a large recreation area at the center of the neighborhood, this may be an ideal location to group the mailboxes. At the same time, if a rural development is built, and the homes are to be placed on lots of four to five acres in size, it would not be in the best interests of the customer to place all the mailboxes in one location, five miles from one side of the development. Customer convenience must be given first priority.
4. AMS guidelines must be considered, block face intersections, extensions of blocks and other items that determine ZIP+4 codes.
g. A CBU/NDCBU Master File containing a completed roster for every unit installed (filed alphabetically by street name served) and a list in ID number order showing the manufacturer, type, location, installation date and carrier route number must be maintained at each office. The purpose of the file is threefold:
1. To ensure that ID numbers are not duplicated.
2. To provide quick reference for maintenance purposes.
3. To provide a reference for looking up corresponding compartment and ID numbers for customer addresses.
Note: When CBU's are installed their serial numbers should be included in the Master File.
h. Parcel lockers may be used in conjunction with postal-owned or customer-owned delivery equipment. In general, deployment should be one compartment for every 20 deliveries. When parcel lockers are deployed, a letter explaining the operation of the locker should be placed in each customer's box.
1. Number each compartment. Do not repeat any number within the same complex. Be sure to write your delivery ZIP Code and the location address on the key tag. it is wise to keep 2 extra keys on file and replace the lock or make extra keys before using the last key.
2. Maintain a parcel locker log showing the manufacturer, location, installation date, and date of any required maintenance and safety inspections.
7-4.2.3 Site Selection
7-4.2.3.1 Overview
Centralized delivery equipment must be located properly to assure customer convenience and operational benefits. To accomplish this, the postal manager must:
a. Plan the Delivery Pattern with Station/Branch managers or super- visors and carriers if possible.
1. Consider the travel patterns of surrounding routes.
2. Use a plat map of the subdivision to lay out the delivery pattern.
3. Choose a travel pattern that is safe and compact.
4. Avoid any backing up or duplication in line of travel.
5. Avoid requiring carriers to crisscross streets unless absolutely necessary.
6. Consider future growth. A thorough consideration at this stage will minimize later alterations.
b. Locate Sites. Discuss potential sites with the developer. Ultimately, the decision rests with USPS.
1. Draw the delivery pattern on the plat map.
2. Start at the entrance of the subdivision and mark tentative unit locations and designate the area each is to serve.
3. Consider the area's growth potential.
4. Consider the following:
(a) Visibility and fighting.
(b) Safety.
(c) Cost.
(d) Traffic volume/speed.
(e) Flooding.
(f) Irrigation.
(g) Convenient for customer/carrier.
(h) AMS coordination.
(i) Property line.
(j) Avoid front of residence when possible.
(k) Easement.
(l) Aesthetics.
(m) Utilities above or under ground.
(n) Projected street improvement.
(o) Customers/carrier parking.
(p) Avoid secluded, darkened areas.
c. Obtain Final Approval. After all locations are selected, obtain final approval from owner, builder, developer, or local government authority. (See the Planning section in the Central Delivery Guidelines.) These approvals should be retained in the office for at least 5 years beyond the completion of the development or as long as the equipment is in service.
7-4.2.3.2 Collection Service
Each centralized, delivery location must provide a mail slot for the collection of mail. Standardize the location of the collection compartment and highlight the interior of the unit using paint, tape or special label for ease of employee awareness Place label 55-C on the side of the designated collection compartment. CBU's include a factory labeled outgoing mail slot identified as "Outgoing Mail" so label 55-C is not necessary.
In areas designated for centralized delivery service, the postal manager should review the existing collection service, in accordance with 315.32 and 323.2 of the POM. All collection points requiring a separate pick up must be approved by the local official in charge of collections.
7-4.2.3.3 AMS (ZIP+4)
If units will be installed in a non-coded area, the postal manager must notify AMS using PS Form 1621 as soon as possible. Refer to reverse side of PS Form 1621 Section IV for other documentation.
a. If possible, include copy of Plat map showing street names, addresses, and locations of delivery equipment. (OR) provide as much info as possible.
b. Contact the AMS Manager to ensure the assigned codes are compatible with the delivery pattern.
c. Exercise care (when locating equipment to coincide with the previously assigned 4-digit code) to ensure that customers are not required to travel an excessive distance.
d. Refer to AMS section for more detailed information.
7-4.2.3.4 Inspection Prior to Installation
Even though USPS representatives at the manufacturers' plants randomly inspect equipment, you should randomly select and open shipping packages to inspect for the following items:
1. Is the unit free from damage that may have been caused by improper handling, during shipping?
2. Is the unit free from sharp edges, corners, protruding rivets, rust, chipped paint, and operational features that might injure or hamper the carrier or customer?
3. Do compartment doors operate freely, do they bind or have excessive play?
4. Does the master loading door operate freely, does it bind or have excessive play?
5. Is access to the compartments free from restriction caused by the master loading door?
6. Are the compartment openings free from restriction caused by the compartment door framework or the supporting members?
7. Is one compartment of the unit convertible to a collection receptacle?
8. Are installation instructions and necessary hardware included?
9. Are seams and connections tight?
If deficiencies are detected, the postal manager must notify the office that purchased the equipment. A report of the defects should be provided to the Purchasing Service Center.
7-4.2.3.5 Rosters
Offices should maintain a roster to obtain information and control maintenance. Included in this section are samples of manual and computerized rosters.
7-4.3 Prepping the CBU/NDCBU
7-4.3.1 Overview
1. Using the completed roster as a guide, write, label or otherwise place the corresponding addresses in each compartment. Be sure the carrier can easily read the addresses. Street name and number range should be placed on the inside of the left loading door (NDCBU). In the CBU, place this information on the lip below each compartment so it is not visible to the customer.
2. Remove the customer keys and package them in a manner that will ensure that the correct keys are issued for each compartment.
3. Install the arrow lock and lock the unit. The door should lock easily.
4. Place Label 55-A (Eagle) on side box facing carrier's approach. In multiple box locations, put a label on each end box.
5. Place Label 55-C on any compartment opened for collection. Do not place Label 55-C or Label 55-D on the CBU.
6. Place ID # on the box so as to be easily seen by the customer (vertically on the customer side of the pedestal or on the side of the unit).
ID #'s are not to be duplicated within any delivery ZIP Code. The first two (2) numbers of the ID # will be the last two (2) numbers of the delivery zone ZIP Code. These last three (3) numbers will be assigned sequentially beginning with 001. For example the ID # of the first NDCBU installed in the 33602 zone would be 02001. ID NUMBERS ARE NOT TO BE PLACED ON CUSTOMER OWNED CBU's/NDCBU's.
Note: The CBU's have individual serial #'s and can be tracked by that as well as the ID.

7-4.3.2 Suggested Labeling Techniques (Inside)
1. Brother P-Touch labeling device.
2. Engraved Plastic - Glue on (Tape).
3. Engraved Plastic - Snap-in.
4. Metal Foil - Engraved numbers.
5. Metal Foil - Typed numbers.
6. Metal Foil - Indelible Marker.
7. Plasticized Paper - Kroy Machine.
8. Plasticized Paper - Stencils.
9. Dymo Tape (with improved glue) - Large Type 1/2".
10. C.A.S.E. Labels with plastic coating and 2 sided Tape
7-4.3.3 Numbering and Locks and Keys
Postal managers should number centralized delivery equipment as follows:
a. Assign postal owned equipment an Identifying number or letter.
b. Place this identification number on each unit. Use plastic stick-on decals or stencils. These numbers are not to be used in the customer's mailing address. Use 2" blue aluminum numbers. Check locally for availability. Lustre Cal in California manufactures labels with serialized numbers in sequence; for a catalog, call (209) 334-6263.
c. Label the inside bottom ledge of each compartment with the address assigned to it, in sequence, when practical, from top to bottom and from left to right. When labeling a CBU, put names and addresses on the lip below each compartment so they will not be visible when customers open their compartments. You must work closely with the AMS unit to assure maximum benefits from the installation of centralized delivery equipment.
d. The compartment doors may be numbered on the front, in sequence, from top to bottom and from left to right. These compartment numbers must not be used as part of the customer mailing address. The customers' names and street numbers must not appear on the outside of the compartment.
e. Send a copy of the subdivision plat map to AMS. This map must include street names, approved street numbers, and location of equipment. Areas to be served by each unit should also be noted on this plat map for final approval by AMS office.
f. Place the assigned compartment numbers on a roster of equipment locations (see examples in this section). This roster should include as a minimum, the unit identification number, the location of the unit, the addresses served at each unit (including ZIP+4 Codes), serial # if CBU, and the date the unit became functional. It should be prepared before the unit is placed in service. These rosters are to be kept in the delivery office as long as the equipment is operational.
g. Notice 69-B, Neighborhood Delivery and Collection Box, can be completed by the postmaster or designee. The completed form can be given to the real estate salesman, or sales office for issuance to the buyer upon completion of the sale or left by the carrier at each residence where lt will be found by the new occupant.
h. If a person with disabilities cannot reach their compartment, exchange compartments to a lower compartment or extend delivery to their residence.
7-4.3.4 Supplying Locks and Keys
The Postal Service supplies all compartment locks and three keys. Customers may duplicate keys at no expense to the Postal Service.
Postal managers should take the following actions in issuing and controlling locks and keys:
a. Postal management has the responsibility for establishing procedures for distribution and storage of keys for centralized delivery equipment.
b. For CBU's/NDCBU's, give all compartment keys to the customer with a notice stating that the Postal Service keeps no duplicate keys and if all keys are lost a new lock will have to be installed at their expense. Refer to Section 3, Policy, page 5 for additional information.
c. Ask customers to return all compartment keys to the post office when they move from their residence. When a customer moves, the lock should be changed before the compartment is reissued.
d. Where all of the compartments are not assigned, locks and cams for the unassigned compartments may be used as replacements. Remove and switch locks between an unassigned compartment and the customer's compartment requiring a new lock. To keep the doors secure, always re- install a lock (in the locked position) in all unassigned compartments.
e. Postal management should provide the customer with instructions on proper operating procedures for all centralized delivery equipment.
f. When new centralized delivery equipment is installed, remove all keys and store them at the post office.
g. Keep all keys for unassigned compartments at the post office.
h. Suggested method of storage is to use P-570 envelopes labeled with address, compartment number, CBUINDCBU location, and identifying number of the unit.
i. For parcel locker customer keys:
1. When not in use, the parcel locker compartments must be kept in a locked position.
2. The keys for compartments not in use should be kept in the outgoing mail compartment of the accompanying NDCBU, or in a Parcel locker key holder (PSIN D1199).
3. Carriers must check all parcel lockers each delivery day and remove customer keys not in use. Follow procedures outlined above.
4. In post offices, the customer keys should be secured behind the screen line when not in use. Parcel lockers in postal facilities should be checked a minimum of once a day for customer keys left in the lock.
5. For more detailed information on parcel lockers, refer to Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-4.3.5 Locks and Keys
Customer door locks for CBU's/NDCBU's are available as an item of supply at the Materiel Distribution Centers.
Order locks and cams during your normal requisitioning cycle using PS Form 7380, MDC Supply Requisition. Cite the Postal Service item number and required quantity. The unit of issue for either locks or cams is one package of ten each so don't mistakenly order ten times the required quantity.
A listing showing the item numbers and application for NDCBU locks and cams can be found in Maintenance Bulletin MMO-4M4 (see Maintenance section in Central Delivery Guidelines). Note that lock 0910A replaces the discontinued 0910C. All Weather Parcel Lockers and CBUs require lock number 09108. Cams for them can be ordered directly from the respective manufacturer.
Customer door locks for p.o. box modules are ordered in the same fashion as CBU/NDCBU locks. Item number 03068 is used in box modules 2901-2903 and 0306D in 2904 and 2905 modules. Keys cannot be locally duplicated but replacement keys can be ordered from the Mail Equipment Shops on PS Form 3915, Post Office Box Key Requisition. Non-accountable locks, which have keys that can be locally duplicated, are expected to be available in FY 94.
Arrow Locks: Use PS Form 4983, Postal Key and Lock Requisition, to order arrow locks. Please note that there are two types of arrow locks:
a. Regular arrow locks - for use in most apartment style boxes and NDCBU's/CBU's
b. Y type arrow locks - for use in rotary cabinets and some NDCBU's.
7-4.3.6 After Installation
Visit the site and verify proper installation of equipment and perform slab inspection. The slab(s) should conform to the approved design (see MMO-18-92) unless; "Local conditions such as retaining walls or covering of an existing drainage ditch mitigate the use of these designs. We recommend that any design not conforming to the standard details be approved by a Facilities Service Office or Facilities Service Center. The intent is that a qualified architect or engineer would review and approve any alternate design."
a. Make sure that unit is installed in the proper location, facing the direction you specified (customer compartment facing away from street).
b. Shake unit vigorously. Make sure that the pedestal is secure on the slab and that the head of the box is secure on the pedestal. Check entire unit for potential safety hazards.
c. Are there obvious cracks or imperfections in the slab?
d. Are the units level and correctly spaced?
e. If the unit has not been prepped, secure customer keys and install the arrow lock.
f. If the customer installed the equipment and it passes inspection, it is ready to service.
7-4.4 Preparing the CBU/NDCBU Roster
a. Working with the developer, determine the locations) where CBU's/NDCBU's will be installed.
b. Establish which addresses will be served by each location; determine the number and type (I, II, III) of CBU's/NDCBU's needed to serve the addresses.
c. Be sure to select the CBU/NDCBU types that will efficiently serve the location while still keeping segmentation in mind.
d. A roster must be completed for each postal owned unit deployed. Take the time to fill out the roster completely and correctly. To do so:
1. All entries should be printed and legible.
2. Fill out the top portion of the roster. If you fill out the roster prior to installation, be sure to go back and fill in the installation date.
3. Complete the address, portion of the roster by entering the street name, suffix and number in the appropriate places. Keep addresses in sequential order flow to high). Do not separate odd and even numbers.
4. Addresses are to begin at the upper left compartment (carrier view) and then go down and across.
5. If a compartment is to be used for collections, write "collection" or "outgoing mail" on the appropriate compartment line instead of a numerical entry.
6. If there will be extra compartments, write "not used" on the appropriate compartment line instead of a numerical entry.
7. Write the sector number in the appropriate box. Refer to your delivery zone (AMS) map to obtain the correct sector number.
e. The completed roster may now be used as a guide for filling out the key envelopes. Whenever possible, the rosters and key envelopes should be prepared in advance of equipment installation.
7-5 Optional Equipment
7-5.1 Neighborhood Delivery and Collection Box Units (NDCBU's)
Standard NDCBU equipment has fixed mounting pedestals that secure the unit for customers to conveniently retrieve their mail. In some locations, due to heavy snow accumulations or when the box is located too close to fences, walls, etc., the carrier experiences difficulties in serving rear loading NDCBU's.
A locking NDCBU carousel pedestal, that permits the customer compartments section to rotate 180 degrees, is available to reduce carrier difficulty in serving rear loading NDCBUS. The equipment requires the use of a standard Arrow lock and must not be used without it. Offices ordering the carousel NDCBU pedestal should assure that an adequate supply of Arrow locks is on hand.
The carousel pedestal can be used with NDCBU's manufactured by Bommer, American Device, Auth, Florence and Cutler-Federal. This equipment can be purchased from:
Page Specialty Company
5777 South Fulton Way
Englewood CO 80111-3719
(800) 327-7439.
7-6 Maintenance
7-6.1 General
This section provides valuable information concerning maintenance of central delivery equipment. It Includes:
* Samples of Lock Repair Requests.
* CBU/NDCBU Winterizing Tips.
* Work Order Requests.
* Maintenance Bulletins.
7-6.2 Responsibility
Once delivery equipment is installed, you have the responsibility to make sure that it continues to work properly. Poorly maintained mail receptacles really hurt our image. Builders will be reluctant to choose centralized delivery for future developments if existing units are not maintained properly.
7-6.2.1 Installation
Installation of centralized delivery equipment is accomplished in one of three ways. In some cases, the builders will install postal supplied equipment. In other cases, the USPS installs the equipment either with our own labor force or through the use of local contractors.
Centralized delivery equipment must be installed in conformance with the applicable USPS standards and regulations, and the manufacturer's installation instructions. Additional instructions can be found in the appropriate maintenance bulletins contained in this section.
Planning for installation of centralized delivery equipment should be completed as soon as possible after delivery requirements are determined so that scheduling of installation personnel can be accomplished with the least amount of disruption to the overall maintenance activity. Contractor support should be arranged if local personnel are not available to accomplish installation tasks. Refer to the Installation section for more information.
Centralized delivery equipment should not be installed unless it has been inspected to ensure proper operation and customer and employee safety. Specific inspection criteria can be found in Maintenance Bulletin MMO-55-81 and in the Installation section in this book.
If deficiencies are identified which appear to be the responsibility of the vendor, the person responsible for the purchasing activity, should be notified so that contact with the vendor can be made and a commitment obtained for timely correction of such deficiencies. A report of defects should also be sent to the Purchasing Service Center.
If the vendor does not commit to a timely correction process, USPS maintenance personnel should undertake correction activity. All repair activities performed by USPS personnel to correct apparent vendor deficiencies should be documented in terms of workhours and material costs and submitted to local procurement services. Use PS Form 4568, Postal Equipment Problem Feedback, to advise the appropriate offices of deficient equipment (see MMO-73-84).
A copy of this report should be sent to the Maintenance Technical Support Center, Attn: Plant Equipment Branch, PO. Box 1600, Norman, OK 73070-6704 and the Purchasing Service Center in your area. A list of these offices is in the Purchasing section of Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-6.2.2 Maintenance
Maintenance personnel should expedite all repair requests (PS Form 4805, Maintenance Work Order Request). Local site personnel or local locksmiths normally perform minor repairs, including customer lock replacements, if necessary.
Generally, on-site tasks are limited to replacing customer locks, or replacing a component that is readily accessible and replaceable. When an employee is on site making minor repairs, he should also apply a small amount of lubricant especially designed for locks to each customer door lock, being careful to wipe off any excess. For additional information, see "Customer Lock Replacement" in this section.
Major or more complex maintenance tasks range from replacing a damaged CBU/NDCBU to replacing a carrier access lock/door. When centralized delivery equipment or pedestals require a repair that cannot be accomplished on site, the unit or pedestal should be replaced. If an entire unit must be replaced, every effort should be made to interchange the locks so that customers are not adversely affected by the interchange. Any box identification numbers or other information on the loading side of the equipment should also be transferred.
7-6.2.3 Spare Parts
Spare parts can be obtained from units classified as nonserviceable. A nonserviceable unit is one that has been damaged beyond repair. Before these units are sold as scrap or salvage, attempt to retrieve any usable spare parts, i.e., compartment doors, latches, locking mechanisms, etc.). Catalogue and store spare parts for future use.
Purchase parts for centralized delivery equipment from the manufacturer or their distributors. A distributor list, giving the name, address, phone number and spare parts breakdown is provided with some manufacturers' installation and maintenance instructions. A parts list can be found by referring to the appropriate maintenance bulletin. The requiring office can order spare parts directly from the manufacturers.
Customer lacks and cams can be obtained from the supply centers. Some replacement pedestals for older units manufactured by Superior and American Device can be obtained from the western area supply center. (Ref. maintenance bulletin MMO-41-87)
7-6.2.4 Arrow Locks
Maintenance offices must maintain an adequate supply of Arrow Locks and keys. Reorder, as local needs dictate, on PS Form 4983 and send to the Mail Equipment Shop in Washington, DC.
7-6.3 Reporting Maintenance Actions
7-6.3.1 General
Most maintenance work will be corrective, lock replacement, unit or pedestal replacement, etc.) The local office initiates repairs using Form 4805. In cases involving safety related defects, requests for maintenance may be verbal to expedite repairs; however, such requests and subsequent work must always be recorded on PS Form 4805.
Safety related repairs might require completion of a Form 1767, Report of a Hazardous, Unsafe Condition or Practice. Carriers should use Form 1624, Delivery and Collection Equipment Work Request, to advise management of required repairs.
7-6.3.2 Customer Lock Replacement
There are basically 4 methods of handling replacement of customer locks.
1. In many multi-residential dwelling units, the lock changes are handled by the complex management. (The Postal Service supplies replacement locks free of charge for Postal owned equipment.)
2. The delivery unit (management personnel, custodial, carrier) may handle lock changes.
3. Customer locks can be changed by maintenance.
4. Use local locksmiths.
Note: The U.S. Postal Service does not repair or supply and change compartment locks for privately owned mail receptacles.
7-6.3.3 Paint
Exact paint matching is difficult since paint types and colors are not standard among box manufacturers. Local offices must stock only one type and color of paint to support refinishing needs. Paints listed in the General Service Administrative (GSA) catalog in colors that are similar to the finishes on the majority of the units are as follows:
* Semi-Gloss (Fed. Std. 595 Color No. 26492)
7-6.3.4 Rust Protection for NDCBUs
At this time, the office of Maintenance Management does not advocate the use of any specific rust proofing products. For treatment of minor rust problems, there are on the market a number of commercially available products that can be purchased locally (follow the instructions on the label). Where serious problems are encountered, the equipment should be replaced as soon as possible to avoid any serious safety hazard.
Note: CBU's are manufactured with aluminum or plastic material and should not rust.
7-6.3.5 Results of Inspection Service Audit
Some examples of maintenance problems were identified during a recent Inspection Service audit. They are:
a. Inconsistencies in construction of concrete pads.
b. Lack of preventative maintenance.
c. Safety is not always considered in installation sites.
d. Inferior quality of address labels inside units.
e. Collection compartments are not always provided.
f. Unsightly units are not repaired in a timely manner.
g. Poor record keeping of maintenance expenditures.
h. Units not installed in locations where lighting and visibility would enhance mail security.
Attention to such problems will improve management of central delivery. Use the Equipment Checklist (see Safety section in this book) to assist with this process. Additionally, use your carriers as a source of information. Encourage them to tell you when equipment needs repairs. Use PS Form 4805 to report repairs. Follow up on work requests to ensure repairs are made. Your attention to our delivery equipment will let your customers know that you care.
7-7 Safety
7-7.1 Overview
You cannot eliminate all the safety hazards that exist on every route, but by using central delivery equipment, you can minimize their impact on the carrier.
There will be fewer vehicle accidents, because the carrier is not traveling both sides of the street, stopping and starting at every residence to deliver mail.
The carrier is exposed to fewer hazards on the park and loop route, also. Wet grass, slippery sidewalks, and animals may pose a threat causing a serious injury.
Centralizing the delivery points throughout a neighborhood reduces the likelihood of hazards, and diminishes the chance of a painful injury.
In areas where centralized delivery equipment is installed, the USPS must ensure the equipment does not pose any hazard to delivery employees and customers.
Every station and office with central delivery equipment must conduct safety inspections twice a year. The following pages outline procedures and provide samples of checklists to accomplish this task.
7-7.2 Central Delivery Equipment Inspection Procedure
All central delivery equipment and parcel lockers in your delivery area must be inspected for safety defects and maintenance problems.
Each unit in the field must be inspected for the following items:
a. Assure master number is on unit.
b. Address on master list roster must correspond to actual location on street.
c. General condition of units
1. Missing customer doors?
2. Missing customer locks? (replaced by inspector on site)
3. Painting, striping, eagles?
4. Sharp edges?
5. Vandalism?
6. Weather resistant/water tight?
7. Rust?
8. Dented or damaged?
d. Cement slab
1. Condition (any cracks, etc., that would require repouring).
2. Thickness (if obvious).
e. Mounting bolts and/or attachment to cement pad.
1. Any missing?
2. Not tight?
3. Protruding bolts? (tripping hazard)
4. Rust?
f. Attachment of unit to pedestal.
1. Is it secure and all bolts or rivets tightly in place?
2. Rust?
g. Location of unit.
1. Traffic hazard to employee or customer?
2. Carrier and customer footing?
3. Dimly lit (unsafe) location?
4. Approach to unit from either side?
h. Carrier door retainers?
i. Carrier door's and arrow lock.
1. Open freely?
2. Door hinges okay?
3. Arrow lock operable?
j. Any other condition inspector feels needs to be noted?
When completed, forward inspection forms to proper office for corrective action necessary. Maintain a copy of the completed inspection at your delivery unit.
7-7.3 Parcel Locker Inspection Procedure
Each locker must be inspected for the following items:
a. Locker numbers must appear on or near doors (same number must appear on key or key tags.)
b. Address on master list/roster must correspond to actual location on street.
c. Mounting bolts (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
d. Attachment to pedestal (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
e. Customer locks operate correctly.
1. Locking mechanism operates freely - no sticking.
2. Customer lock will NOT allow door to be locked without arrow (control) key.
f. General condition of unit.
1. Painting, striping, eagles?
2. Vandalism?
3. Door hinges?
4. Sharp edges?
g. Cement slab (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
7-8 Parcel Lockers
7-8.1 General
Parcel lockers may be used for delivery of parcels and all other classes of mall, and may be provided by either the developer/owner or by the U.S. Postal Service when requirements are met.
Approval for installation of parcel lockers is contingent upon a determination by the local postal manager that the proposed area to be served qualifies for delivery service, that the equipment to be installed has been approved by the U.S. Postal Service, and that suitable arrangements can be made for location of these parcel lockers.
Postal Managers must evaluate the needs of a delivery area prior to approving installation and use of parcel lockers, considering security, safety, operational effectiveness and customer convenience. Generally, the normal parcel volume must justify equipment purchase and installation.
Parcel Lockers may be used as an adjunct to post office box, door, curbside or centralized delivery. There are no restrictions due to existence of city or rural delivery service. Keep a sufficient amount of equipment on hand to meet immediate centralized delivery needs, such as business complexes, mobile homes, conversions, and shopping malls.
Purchase of parcel lockers must be from manufacturers whose equipment has been approved by the U.S. Postal Service. Firms interested in the manufacture of parcel lockers should write to the Purchasing Department, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-6220.


7-8.2 Are Parcel Lockers Needed?
Many factors have to be considered before parcel lockers are included in a NDCBU installation. Some of these are:
* Do the users of the centralized delivery equipment receive enough parcels to warrant a parcel locker?
* Parcel lockers are more susceptible to vandalism (because of the ease of breaking off keys). Consider the likelihood of vandalism before installation. Maintenance is deluged with requests for parcel locker lock changes. Advising letter carriers to keep the parcel locker keys in the NDCBU when the parcel locker is empty can minimize this problem. The keys can be stored in a vacant compartment or in the outgoing mail compartment. To assist in this area, a Parcel Locker Key Holder Modification Kit has been developed (PSIN DI 1991).
* The installation of parcel lockers is a management decision - no one knows your area as well as you. Your judgment is the key to an effective Installation.
7-9 Approved Manufacturers
Note: These lists are updated on a regular basis. For the most current information, please contact your Purchasing Service Center.
7-9.1 All Weather Parcel Lockers
American Locker Group, Inc.
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118 (outside New York)
(plastic)
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(painted steel)
7-9.2 Centralized Delivery Equipment
Effective May 1997, the following are approved manufacturers of Centralized Delivery Equipment. This list is updated and published periodically in the Postal Bulletin. You should copy it and use as a handout for customers who need this information. Note the date of approval.
N = NDCBU.
H = Horizontal Apartment Style Boxes. Note: Apartment style boxes are approved for installation; however, the Postal Service is prohibited from purchasing this equipment at this time. You may order replacement parts for Postal owned equipment that was installed in the past.
V = Vertical Apartment Style Boxes.
P = Parcel Locker.
U = Universal and Carousel Pedestals.
C = Cluster Box Unit.
American Locker Group
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118 (outside NY)
-P/C
Auth-Florence Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
-N/H/U/V
Bommer Industries
P.O. Box 187
Landrum, SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
-N/H/V
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
-N/H/V/P
Jensen Industries
1946 E 46th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90058-2097
800-826-7001 (CA only)
800-325-6800
-H/V
Mail Security
714 West Florence Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90044-6106
213-750-7844
-V
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 30111-3719
303-770-2842 (CO only)
800-327-7439
-U
Salsbury Industries
1010 East 62nd Street
Los Angeles, CA 90001-1598
213-232-6181
-V
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grapevine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
-H/V/U
7-9.3 CBU/NDCBU Locks
Hudson Lock, Inc.
81 Apsley Street
Hudson, MA 01749-1547
508-562-3481
Hurd Corporation
503 Bohannon Avenue
P.O. Box 145
Greenville, TN 37744-1450
423-787-8800
National Cabinet Look
200 Old Mill Road
P.O. Box 200
Mauldin, SC 29662-0200
Note: Locks should be ordered from the Topeka material distribution center:
500 SW Montara Pkwy
Topeka, KS 66624-9998
785-267-8704
FAX 785-267-8706
7-9.4 KeyKeeper Devices (Suggested Sources)
American Device Mfg. Co.
P.O. Box 8
Steelville, IL 62288-0008
800-637-3763
American Locker Group, Inc.
Rollform Division
181-T Blackstone Ave.
Jamestown, NY 14701-2203
716-665-5310
Bommer Industries, Inc.
P.O. Box 187
Landrum, SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
Cutler Manufacturing Corp.
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
Dan L. Downing
7273 Paldao Drive
Dallas, TX 75240-2740
214-239-1973
Jensen Industries
1946 E 46th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90058-2096
800-826-7001
800-325-6800 (CA only)
Mail Security
133 East 140th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90061-2117
Miami-Carey Corporation
203-T Garver Road
Monroe, OH 45050-1292
513-539-8441
New York Boxes, Inc.
1068 Brook Avenue
Bronx, NY 10456-5204
212-638-4446
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grape Vine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
Sentinel Diversified Ind., Inc.
2043 Wellwood Avenue
East Farmingdale, NY 11735-1283
516-753-6000
7-9.5 Cluster Box Units
American Locker Group, Inc.
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118
(outside New York)
(plastic)
Auth-Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(painted aluminum)
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(painted aluminum)
7-9.6 Universal Pedestals Only
Cutler Manufacturing Corp.
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 80111-3719
800-327-7439
303-770-2842
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Auth-Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grapevine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
(painted aluminum)
7-9.7 Carrousel Pedestals
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 80111-3719
800-327-7439
303-770-2842
(painted steel)
7-9.8 NDCBU's (All-aluminum units for replacement purchase only)
Note: Aluminum pedestals may also be purchased separately from the suppliers under "Universal Pedestals."
Auth Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(aluminum box & pedestal)

Bommer Industries
P.O. Box 187
Landrum. SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
(aluminum box ONLY, steel pedestal is not approved)

8 Financial Relationships
8-1 Overview
The Department of Defense takes its fiduciary responsibility to the American public seriously. Extensive programs have been put in place to control costs and to ensure that the level of services purchased is required by business goals.
This chapter provides the USPS branch manager with information on financial issues that could be of concern to the Department of Defense community. This chapter places financial product types into the following groups:
a. Permit Imprints.
b. Meters.
For details on any of these financial issues, please contact your district Marketing manager or the district Finance manager.
8-2 Permit Imprints
8-2.1 Overview
A permit imprint is a simple way for Department of Defense installations to pay postage. With a permit imprint, Department of Defense installations can mail First-Class Mail and Standard Mail without affixing metered or stamped postage. Instead, at the time of the mailing, they pay postage from an advance deposit account. Department of Defense installations must be authorized by the Postal Service before using permit imprints.
Permit imprint mailings must contain at least 200 addressed pieces or 50 pounds of addressed pieces. (Certain mailings, such as Presorted First-Class Mail, may require more pieces.) Each piece must have a permit imprint indicia showing that postage is paid. Department of Defense installations must take these mailings to business mail entry units.
8-2.2 Customer Benefits
Permit imprints offer the following benefits to Department of Defense installations and the military mail manager:
a. Eliminate the time and expense of affixing postage to each mail piece.
b. Pay fees for special services as well as postage.
8-2.3 Conditions
The following conditions apply to permit imprints:
a. Department of Defense installations need to get a permit. They start the process by filling out PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile.
b. There is a one-time fee of $85.00.
c. Permit imprint mail must be deposited at a business mail entry unit or another location that the postmaster designates - they must not be deposited in street collection boxes.
d. All pieces in a permit imprint mailing must be of identical weight and size unless the U.S. Postal Service authorizes otherwise, such as in a Manifest Mailing System (MMS) mailing.
e. Before designing and producing a permit imprint, see the standards in DMM P040.
f. Under certain conditions, mailers may use a company permit imprint that includes the name of the firm or person who holds the permit in place of the city, state, and permit number. On a Department of Defense installation, this could be applicable to either official mailings or to mailings prepared by or for a government contractor. See DMM P040.
g. If no mailings are made for 2 years, the U.S. Postal Service revokes the permit.
8-2.4 Frequently Asked Questions
1. Where may I deposit permit imprint mail?
Take permit imprint mail to the business mail entry unit where the permit was issued. In some cases this may be the local U.S. post office on the installation, but normally it will be a separate facility. You may not deposit permit imprint mail in a street collection box.
2. What do I need to use permit imprints?
First, you must get authorization from the Postal Service.
3. How do I receive authorization from the Postal Service?
Fill out PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile.
4. Is there a permit application fee?
Yes, there is a one-time fee of $85. (There is no other fee for the use of permit imprints as long as the permit remains active, but other fees - for example, an annual bulk mailing fee - may be due depending on the class of mail to be prepared.)
5. What is the minimum volume or weight for a permit imprint mailing?
Each mailing must contain at least 200 addressed pieces or 50 pounds of addressed pieces.
Higher minimums may be required for certain types of mailings.
6. May I use a permit imprint to pay for special services as well as postage?
Yes.
8-2.5 Where to Go for Details
See the following publications for more details on permit imprints:
a. For an overview, see Quick Service Guide 025 (published at the front of the DMM).
b. To apply for a permit imprint, use for PS Form 3615.
c. To design and produce a permit imprint, see the standards in DMM P040.
d. To use a company imprint, see DMM P040.3.4. If the Department of Defense installation and/or a contractor desires to use this type of permit imprint, the proper procedures must be followed, including the use of a complete domestic return address.
e. For detailed information on permit imprints, see DMM P040.
8-3 Meters
8-3.1 Overview
Using meters is the normal method of postage payment on Department of Defense installations. With a postage meter, Department of Defense installations can imprint mail on site at the military mail center with the postage, the city and state of mailing, the meter number, and the date (optional for Standard Mail). To use postage meters, the customer does the following:
a. Get a postage meter license. (See 8-3.3.)
b. Establish and maintain an account with the U.S. Postal Service.
c. Lease a postage meter from an approved manufacturer. (See 8-3.4.)
d. Bring the postage meter to the U.S. Postal Service and pay the postage amount to be set on the meter. The Postal Service sets, seals, and checks the meter into service. Meters may also be set remotely through the Remote Meter Setting program.
8-3.2 Customer Benefits
Postage meters offer the following benefits to Department of Defense installations:
a. Cost efficiency. The timesavings generated through meter use, and the capability of tracking exact postage costs through meter software, offset the cost of maintaining an account and leasing a postage meter.
b. Flexibility. Meters can be used with all classes of mail except Periodicals.
c. Convenience. There is no need to maintain and apply a wide variety of stamps, or to purchase new stamps or incremental stamps when rates change.
d. Ease. For mailings of non-standard or non-uniform weights, there is no need to apply stamps having different values in order to affix the proper postage.
8-3.3 Conditions
Department of Defense installations need to get a license from the U.S. Postal Service to use a postage meter. There is no fee for the application and license. They fill out PS Form 3601-A, Application or Update for a License to Lease and Use Postage Meters, and submit the form to each post office where they plan to deposit metered mail (for Department of Defense installations, this normally is the USPS branch office located on the installation). Each application covers all the postage meters licensed by one post office.
Department of Defense installations that want to present the following categories of mail must complete and submit PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile, in addition to Form 3601-A:
a. Presorted First-Class Mail.
b. Bulk Standard Mail (A).
c. Bulk Parcel Post.
d. Bulk Bound Printed Matter.
e. Presorted Special Standard Mail.
The following conditions apply:
a. No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter without a valid Postal Service postage meter license and a lease/rental agreement with a meter manufacturer.
b. No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter that the Postal Service has not set, sealed, and checked into service.
c. Generally, metered mail must be deposited where the postmaster of the licensing post office designates. For exceptions, see DMM P030.5.
d. Metered mail can be drop-shipped. See DMM D072.
e. The meter stamp and date must meet certain guidelines. See DMM P030.4.
8-3.4 Meter Manufacturers
No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter without a valid Postal Service postage meter license and a lease/rental agreement with a meter manufacturer. Contact the local representative of the following USPS-approved meter manufacturers for more information:
ASCOM HASLER MAILING SYSTEMS INC
19 FOREST PKWY
SHELTON CT 06484-0903
FRANCOTYP-POSTALIA INC
1980 UNIVERSITY LN
LISLE IL 60532-2152
NEOPOST
30955 HUNTWOOD AVE
HAYWARD CA 94544-7005
PITNEY BOWES INC
1 ELMCROFT RD
STAMFORD CT 06926-0700
8-3.5 Frequently Asked Questions
1. May I use postage meters for all classes of mail?
You may use meters for everything except Periodicals.
2. What do I need to use a postage meter?
First, you must get authorization from the Postal Service.
3. What do I do first to get authorization from the Postal Service?
Fill out Form 3601-A, Application or Update for a License to Lease and Use Postage Meters, for each post office where you will deposit metered mail.
4. Is there a permit application fee?
No.
5. Where can I deposit metered mail?
Take it to the post office that holds your license or to another designated location.
6. How do I find a manufacturer approved by the Postal Service?
See 8-4.4 for companies authorized by the Postal Service to manufacture and lease postage meters.
8-3.6 Where to Go for Details
See the following publications for more details on permit imprints:
a. For an overview, see Quick Service Guide 024 (published at the front of the DMM).
b. To apply for a license to use postage meters, ask for Form 3601-A.
c. For detailed information, see DMM P030.

1
Appendix A: Publication 38
Postal Agreement With the Department of Defense (February 1980)
Foreword
Postal service for all branches of the Armed Forces is provided jointly by the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense under terms of a formal agreement as printed in this publication. The Agreement has been published to insure that postal officials concerned with providing postal services to the Armed Forces are fully acquainted with its terms.
Pursuant to paragraph V of the general policy statements of the Agreement, the Postmaster General has designated the Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, as the U.S. Postal Service official to maintain continuing liaison with the military postal authorities and to represent the U.S. Postal Service in carrying out terms of the Agreement.
[signed]
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group
Postal Agreement Between the United States Postal Service and the Department Of Defense
I. Purpose
In recognition of the need for providing coordinated and efficient postal services for the Armed Forces in time of peace, war, or national emergency, and during maneuvers, the Department of Defense and the United States Postal Service consider it appropriate to enter into the following agreement setting forth their respective responsibilities.
II. Definitions
Terms used in this Agreement are defined in Appendix A.
III. Policy
A. The Military Postal Service is operated as an extension of the United States Postal Service as authorized by 39 U.S C. 406.
B. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service agree to attempt to furnish mail service to the military equal to that provided the civilian population in the United States.
C. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service affirm the importance of the national goal of energy conservation, and both parties resolve to minimize energy expenditure while conducting military postal operations.
IV. Responsibilities
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Maintain and operate military post offices in support of Armed Forces operations and personnel at locations outside the United States, or inside the United States where the military situation requires;
2. Ensure that each military post office that provides postal financial or accountable mail services or exchanges incoming and outgoing mail directly with carriers is supervised by at least one qualified, on site, military member of the Armed Forces;
3. Administer the military postal service in accordance with law, with policies and regulations of the Postal Service, and with consistent implementing directives of the Department of Defense;
4. Arrange with foreign governments to permit military post offices to be established and military postal operations to be conducted in foreign countries;
5. Furnish information required by the Postal Service to provide efficient postal services to authorized personnel and units;
6. Establish and operate mail control activities at principal locations used by the Postal Service to receive and dispatch military mail and to provide information to distribute and dispatch mail for overseas and maneuver forces, ships, and other mobile units;
7. In time of war or national emergency, assist or supplement Postal Service operation of bulk mail centers, postal concentration centers, and airport mail facilities;
8. Establish and operate mail control activities at military aerial ports to receive outgoing military mail from the Postal Service for dispatch via military air transport and to receive incoming military mail via military air transport for entry into civilian postal channels;
9. Conduct postal finance services at military post offices, to include selling stamps and stamped paper; issuing domestic money orders; cashing money orders, when feasible, and providing certified, insured, and Registered Mail services. Remittances to the Postal Service shall be in dollars in the amounts required by the schedules of rates, fees, and charges provided by postal regulations;
10. Make periodic audits and inspections of military post offices.
B. The United States Postal Service agrees to:
1. Provide postal services for the Armed Forces at locations inside the United States, including the establishment of civilian post offices on military installations and the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services consistent with United States postal laws and regulations, normal standards of the Postal Service, and changing military requirements;
2. Establish and operate postal concentration centers, as needed, for the concentration, sorting, and delivery or dispatch of military mail in accordance with requirements of the Department of Defense.
3. Process military mail in an expeditious manner while efficiently separating mail for the Armed Forces prior to delivery or dispatch;
4. Furnish information to the Department of Defense to permit proper routing of military mail prior to its entry into civilian postal channels;
5. Authorize the establishment of military post offices as branches of designated civilian post offices;
6. Extend stamp credits from designated civilian post offices to postal finance offices and other custodians of postal effects;
7. Assist the Department of Defense by informing postmasters and the public of proper addressing practices, applicable restrictions, and other military mail matters of interest.
V. Administration
A. The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs and Logistics) shall serve as the point of contact with the United States Postal Service and shall implement and administer this agreement for the Department of Defense. The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs and Logistics) may enter into supplemental agreements with the United States Postal Service as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this agreement.
B. The Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, shall serve as point of contact with the Department of Defense and shall implement and administer this agreement for the United States Postal Service. The Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, may enter into supplemental agreements with the Department of Defense as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this agreement.
VI. Review and Amendment
This agreement may be amended at any time by mutual agreement. It shall be reviewed every five years by the Department of Defense and the Postal Service.
VII. Effective Date
This agreement is effective when signed by both parties, and supersedes the existing agreement dated February 2, 1959, as amended. To the extent provisions in any other agreement between the Postal Service and the Department of Defense are inconsistent with this agreement, this agreement takes precedence.
For the Department of Defense:
Deputy Secretary of Defense
For the United States Postal Service:
Postmaster General
February 21,1980
Appendix A, USPS-Department of Defense Postal Agreement: Definitions
Accountable Equipment - Postal Service equipment entrusted by an accountable postmaster to a custodian of postal effects for use at a military post office.
Accountable Mail - A term for registered, numbered-insured, and certified mail.
Aerial Mail Terminal - A Department of Defense facility established at foreign airports or U.S. overseas bases to send, receive, distribute, combine, transfer, and dispatch military mail.
Aerial Port - An airfield that has been designated for air movement of personnel and material and as an authorized port for entrance or departure from the country in which it is located.
Airport Mail Facility - A Postal Service mail processing installation established to concentrate, transfer, receive, distribute, and dispatch air eligible mail.
Armed Forces - The United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and components thereof.
Army or Air Force Post Office - A military post office, activated, staffed, and operated by the Department of the Army or Department of the Air Force to serve authorized organizations and personnel.
Bulk Mail Centers - Postal Service mail processing centers that comprise a nationwide system for concentration, distribution, and transportation of third and fourth class mail and second class mail without time value.
Civilian Post Office - A United States post office, branch, station, or money order unit operated by employees of the Postal Service or under contract with that agency.
Continental United States - The 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia.
Custodians of Postal Effects - Members or civilian employees of the Armed Forces accountable for administration of the postal effects entrusted to them by the Postal Service for the operation of military post offices. Civilian custodians of postal effects are supervised by members of the Armed Forces.
Department of Defense - The executive department that includes the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the military departments, Defense agencies, the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Unified and Specified Commands.
Financial Postal Clerk - A civilian employee of the Armed Forces who receives or delivers incoming or outgoing mail and performs financial services at a military post office. Financial postal clerks are supervised by members of the Armed Forces.
Fleet Mail Center - A facility operated by the Navy to receive, distribute, transfer, and dispatch military mail for transportation to, from, and within overseas areas.
Fleet Post Office - A Naval activity established within the Continental United States by the Chief of Naval Operations near a Postal Concentration Center for the purpose of providing a standard mail address for forces afloat and for mobile shore-based units and activities overseas and maintaining liaison with and furnishing mail routing and dispatching information to appropriate civilian and military postal authorities.
Mail Clerk - (e.g., unit mail clerk, mail orderly, consolidated mailroom clerk, Postal Service Center clerk). A member or civilian employee of the Armed Forces, or an employee of a civilian agency, who receives or delivers incoming or outgoing mail at a civilian or military post office or designated mailroom, on behalf of a military unit or civilian agency.
Mail Control Activity - A civilian or military facility engaged in the handling of mail, i.e., an aerial mail terminal, airport mail facility, bulk mail center, fleet mail center, military mail terminal, or Postal Concentration Center.
Mail Directory - An alphabetical listing by name of individuals served and those departed. Inside the United States, mail directories are maintained by military units to process undeliverable military mail for personnel in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less. Outside the United States, mail directories are maintained by units, military post offices and central or area postal directories to process undeliverable military mail for personnel of the command.
Mail Directory Service - A search of mail directory files for the name of the addressee of undeliverable military mail and endorsing each piece to show a forwarding address or reason for nondelivery.
Mailroom - A facility operated by the Department of Defense for the receipt and delivery of mail for military units or other authorized organizations and agencies,
Military Departments - The Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.
Military Mail - Domestic and international mail which bears a military address or return address and that, at some stage in its transmission, is in the possession of the Department of Defense.
Military Mail Terminal - In the United States, a mail control activity that provides information for the in-transit processing, dispatch, and transportation of military mail addressed to overseas military post offices. Overseas, a military facility established and operated to meet the requirements of the area or overseas command to receive, distribute, relabel, dispatch, control, or regulate the flow of bulk outgoing and incoming mail.
Military Post Office - A branch of a designated United States civilian post office established by authority of the Postal Service and operated by one of the military departments. The term includes Army or Air Force Post Offices, Navy Post Offices, and such Coast Guard Offices as may be established.
Military Postal Clerk - A member of the Armed Forces designated to perform postal duties.
Military Postal Service - The command, organization, personnel, and facilities established to provide, through military post offices, a means for the transmission of mail to and from the Department of Defense, members of the Armed Forces, and other authorized agencies and individuals.
Navy Post Office - A military post office activated, staffed, and operated by the Department of the Navy to serve authorized organizations and personnel.
Postal Concentration Center - A Postal Service facility at which military mail is concentrated for processing and delivery or dispatch.
Postal Effects - All stock, funds, and accountable equipment entrusted to the Department of Defense by the Postal Service for military postal operations. Postal effects include postage stamps, stamped paper, and funds derived from their sale; blank money order forms, paid money orders, and money order funds; fees collected for special mail services; and any accountable equipment furnished by the Postal Service.
Postal Finance Officer - A custodian designated to maintain wholesale quantities of postal effects and nonaccountable equipment and supplies issued to retail custodians of postal effects, for the operation of military post offices.
Postal Service - The United States Postal Service, an independent establishment of the Executive Branch of the Government of the United States, established under the authority of Title 39, United States Code, to provide postal services to the people of the United States.
Postal Service Center - A facility operated by the Air Force for receipt and delivery of military mail.
United States - The 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the territories and possessions of the United States.
Supplemental Postal Agreement: Administrative Details
I. Transportation
A. The Department of Defense agrees to arrange for military mail transportation from overseas postal facilities to commercial or military terminals in the United States and between military postal activities within overseas areas.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Arrange for military mail transportation to overseas postal facilities from commercial terminals in the United States and make transportation arrangements when the postal services of another country are required. However, this does not preclude Military Departments from making direct arrangements for the transportation of military mail to or between designated overseas points on a short term basis when operational requirements dictate.
2. Provide inbound and outbound mail transportation between the postal concentration centers and military or commercial air or surface carriers.
3. Transport mail between civilian post offices on military installations and the receiving or dispatching Postal Service facility.
II. Personnel
The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Appoint mail clerks and issue them uniform identification cards.
2. Assign only qualified personnel to duties in military post offices, mailrooms, mail control activities, and other postal facilities. No persons convicted of a crime involving theft or moral turpitude or disciplined for any action reflecting unfavorably upon their integrity shall be assigned to postal duties. Those having a history of psychiatric disorder, alcoholism, or drug abuse may be so assigned if medical evidence of current good health, sufficient to meet published Postal Service standards, is available. This does not preclude the Department of Defense from establishing requirements that are more stringent than the published Postal Service standards.
III. Equipment
A. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Provide equipment and furniture necessary for the operation of civilian post offices located on military installations.
2. Furnish equipment and supplies for use in military post offices. Equipment shall be new or serviceable and shall be issued in accordance with mutually determined issuance standards. Supplies and accountable equipment shall be furnished without charge. Nonaccountable equipment shall be furnished on a reimbursable basis beginning in FY 1982.
3. Repair equipment for which it has a unique capability.
B. The Department of Defense agrees to transport such equipment between the continental United States and the overseas destination.
IV. Delivery
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Decline to accept Collect on Delivery mail for delivery at military post offices.
2. Not provide special delivery service.
3. Deliver mail to personnel in a temporary duty status, in training, and where delivery requirements exceed Postal Service standards.
4. Deliver accountable mail, delivery of which is restricted by the sender, through mail clerks, only upon the written authorization of the addressee when it is impracticable for the addressee to accept delivery in person at the civilian post office.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Neither accept nor forward to military post offices any Collect on Delivery mail.
2. Provide delivery service on military installations in the United States commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided for civilian communities of comparable characteristics. Postal Service criteria shall be used in considering extensions of delivery service. Mail to principal administrative buildings or commands shall be delivered in bulk. The Postal Service agrees to also provide the mail in bulk to personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less. Where criteria will not allow free delivery service to be established or extended, the Postal Service agrees to provide the mail for individuals in bulk to basic units. However, in locations with adjacent civilian communities having delivery service, the Postal Service agrees to submit proposals to the Department of Defense to furnish service to groups of receptacles consistent with mutually agreed criteria and funding.
3. Deliver accountable mail addressed to military personnel, at military installations served by civilian post offices, to the addressees or mail clerks upon proper receipt.
V. Claims
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Assume financial liability, under military claims procedures, for loss, damage, theft, wrong delivery, or rifling of accountable mail after receipt from or prior to delivery to a civilian or military post office by a mail clerk employed by the Department of Defense.
2. Reimburse the Postal Service for claims submitted by the Postal Service for the value of postal effects embezzled or lost through negligence, errors or defalcations while in the possession of military post office personnel. Reimburse the Postal Service for claims paid by the Postal Service for losses of accountable mail through negligence, errors, or defalcations while in the possession of military post office personnel.
a. To be reimbursable, claims must be submitted within one year from the discovery of the loss by the Postal Service.
b. In all just and expedient cases, the military departments may request the Postal Service to take action under 39 U.S.C. 2601(a)(3) to adjust, pay or credit the account of a Military Post Office, Postal Finance Officer, Military Postal Clerk, Financial Postal Clerk, Custodian of Postal Effects, or persons acting in those capacities for any loss of Postal Service funds, papers, postage, or other stamped stock or accountable paper, under the same standards as such credit is granted to Postal Service employees.
B. The Postal Service agrees to relieve custodians of postal effects of responsibility for the amount of the invoice of any shipment of stamps or stamped paper lost in transit as a result of casualty.
VI. Logistical and Administrative Support
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Furnish adequate facilities for civilian post offices located at military installations solely in support of the installation's mission. Utilities and local telephone service shall be furnished on a reimbursable basis beginning in FY 1982.
2. Offer billeting and meals to civilian post office employees who work at military installations on the same basis as those offered to Department of Defense civilian employees.
3. Issue invitational travel orders for Postal Service representatives who, at the request of the Department of Defense, are assigned to perform inspections, investigations, or audits of overseas military postal operations.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Reserve the right to discontinue civilian post offices on military installations where existing conditions endanger the health, safety, or welfare of its employees.
2. Furnish office space for related military mail terminals, fleet post offices, or liaison units at postal concentration centers.
VII. Audits and Inspections
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Assist Postal Service representatives in surveying, inspecting, and auditing military postal operations.
2. Conduct surveys, inspections, investigations, and audits of Department of Defense postal facilities and operations as needed to verify that accountable postal effects are on hand and properly protected, that all revenue due the Postal Service is being collected and properly accounted for, and that the service rendered is efficient and in accordance with Postal Service and Department of Defense regulations.
B. The Postal Service agrees to assign Postal Inspectors or other representatives of the Postal Service, as practicable, to conduct surveys, inspections, investigations, and audits of military postal operations to assure that efficient postal service is maintained.
VIII. Mail Sortation
A. Except in time of war or other emergency as determined by the Secretary of Defense, the Postal Service agrees to:
1. Sort mail for overseas forces in fixed base units to the five digit Army Post Office/Fleet Post Office ZIP Code separation. Mail for ships and other mobile units shall be sorted to the mobile unit by ZIP Code or name when warranted. Mail for maneuver forces, air groups, submarine groups, units in transit or temporary duty status for 180 days or less, and other similar units shall be separated in accordance with the needs of the Department of Defense. The Department of Defense agrees to develop mail routings for all of the above mail and provide the routing instructions to the postal concentration centers of the Postal Service.
2. Sort mail for the forces at installations in the United States where delivery receptacles are not provided to basic military units or numbered boxes in groups of approximately 200, so far as practicable and mutually agreeable to the Postmaster and military authorities concerned.
B. In time of war or other emergency as determined by the Secretary of Defense, the Postal Service agrees to:
1. Allow the Department of Defense to control ZIP Code assignment to all military units.
2. Specify jointly with the Department of Defense the sorting of mail for overseas forces and forces at installations in the United States.
C. Postal Service criteria shall be used to assign ZIP Codes to military installations in the United States.
D. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service agree to cooperate in the assignment and use of overseas ZIP Codes.
1. Normally each military installation shall have one five digit ZIP Code, although special circumstances may be considered in assigning additional ZIP Codes. Additional ZIP Codes shall only be assigned if all resulting separations receive at least 1,000 pieces of mail per day. The implementing procedures for nine digit ZIP Codes shall be jointly developed.
2. The Department of Defense agrees to make every reasonable effort to see that its components have the correct ZIP Code in their address and return address. The Postal Service agrees to make every reasonable effort to see the correct ZIP Code is in the address and return address of mail for military units and personnel originated by other government agencies and the civilian sector. Since the ZIP Code furnishes the Postal Service with its sole method of forwarding Army Post Office and Fleet Post Office mail, the Postal Service agrees to return to sender at the post office of origin all mail for Army Post Office or Fleet Post Office addresses that does not have an authorized Army Post Office/Fleet Post Office ZIP Code.
IX. Mail Forwarding
A. Where the Department of Defense delivers the mail it agrees to provide directory service for undeliverable-as-addressed military mail and endorse each piece to show a forwarding address or reason for nondelivery.
B. Where the Postal Service delivers the mail it agrees to maintain change of address forms and endorse forwardable mail that is undeliverable as addressed.
X. SAM/PAL Law
A. This paragraph provides for the joint development of regulations as required by 39 U.S.C. 3401 (f) (1976) by the Postal Service and the Department of Defense concerning administration of the "SAM/PAL Law." Each party agrees to designate one or more organizational counterparts to serve on a committee to discuss conditions and regulations under which the SAM/PAL law will be jointly administered.
1. For the Postal Service, the designees are: The Assistant Postmasters General, Mail Processing Department, and Rates and Classification Department, or their designees; and, the Chief Postal Inspector or his designee.
2. For the Department of Defense, the designee is: The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Supply, Maintenance and Transportation) or his designee.
B. Neither party shall take any unilateral action with respect to implementing policies, conditions, or regulations promulgated exclusively under the SAM/PAL law without prior consultation with the other party. Committee meetings may be held upon written request of either party. Following such consultation, a joint committee report may be prepared for transmission to the respective managements.
C. Nothing herein is intended to provide for the joint administration of any activity whose administration is not provided for by 39 U.S.C. 3401 (f) (1976).
D. This section supersedes the supplementary agreement dated September 30, 1976 concerning "Joint Administration of Title 39, United States Code, Section 3401 (The SAM/PAL Law) by the United States Postal Service and the Department of Defense."
Xl. Review and Amendment
This Agreement may be amended at any time by mutual agreement. It shall be reviewed every five years by the Department of Defense and the Postal Service.
Xll. Effective Date
This Agreement is effective when signed by both parties.
For the Department of Defense:
Assistant Secretary of Defense
For the United States Postal Service:
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group
February 22, 1980

Appendix B: Publication 38-A
Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations (June 1983)
A. Purpose
This publication describes the postal services available to military installations in the United States. The term United States includes the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the territories and possessions. These guidelines describe and/or expound upon USPS Publication 38, Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense, February, 1980.
B. Distribution
1. Initial. Distribution is limited to the affected Management Sectional Centers.
2. Additional Copies. Order additional copies from your area supply center using Form 7380, Supply Center Requisition.
C. Comments and Questions
Address any comments or questions regarding the content of this publication to:
Office of Delivery and Retail Operations
USPS Headquarters
Washington, DC 20260-7220
D. Effective Date
This publication is effective July 1, 1983.
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group

I. Delivery Service
A. Policy
Mail delivery service on military installations in the United States should be commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided civilian communities of comparable characteristics.
B. Basic Services
1. Official Military Mail
Deliver official mail addressed to principal commands on military installations in bulk.* (*Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or Military units are housed in a single building deliver all mail to a central point in the building.) Principal command are normally corps, fleets, the installation headquarters, divisions, wings, other major commands and equivalent Navy organizations located on the military installation.
2. Civilian Business Mail
Deliver mail addressed to civilian operated businesses such as the commissary, post or base exchange, bank, etc. as addressed.
3. Military Unit Mail
Deliver official and personal mail addressed to military units such as battalions, groups and similar organization in bulk.* (*Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or Military units are housed in a single building deliver all mail to a central point in the building.) Mail addressed to units such as supply depots, maintenance activities and publication centers generating a sufficient volume to warrant delivery shall be delivered in bulk.
4. Delivery Option
Although the above services are available to military installations this does not prohibit the military or a civilian business from electing to pick up their mail from the postal facility or requesting the Postal Service to deliver all mail to a control point on the installation.
C. Additional Services
1. Permanent Party Personnel
a. Family Quarters. Provide service to new residences on military installations through centralized delivery units in accordance with the prevailing national policy for extension and establishment of delivery service. Delivery service currently provided may be converted to centralized delivery service when agreed to by officials of the military installation and the Management Sectional Center (MSC) Postmaster.
b. Apartment Type Bachelor Quarters. Delivery service shall be provided in accordance with USPS Publication 17, Apartment House Mail Receptacles Regulations and Manufacturing Standards, through centralized delivery units to bachelor quarters with apartment house configuration and where units are occupied by one individual. For the purposes of this provision, apartment house configuration consist of buildings containing multi-residential units, each with complete living quarters consisting of a living room and bedroom or combination living-sleeproom, kitchen-kitchenette, and bath.
c. Non-apartment Type Bachelor Quarters. Provide delivery in bulk in one of the following manners, as agreed to by officials of the military installation and the MSC Postmaster:
(1) Delivery in bulk with official military mail.
(2) Delivery in bulk to a single delivery point.
For the purpose of this provision, non-apartment bachelor quarters are buildings containing multi-residential units and each unit is occupied by one individual; each unit containing a living room and bedroom or combination living-sleeproom and bath.
d. Barracks. Do not provide delivery service to barracks. For the purpose of this provision, barracks consist of buildings containing multi-residential units. The units are occupied by one or more individuals sharing a common bath and/or cooking facilities.
2. Non-permanent Party Personnel
Regardless of the type of housing, provide delivery in bulk to personnel in training and personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less.
3. Undeliverable as Addressed Mail
Deliver mail not specifically addressed to a building, command, or unit, to the installation directory service or to a point agreed upon by officials of the military installation and the MSC Postmaster. After the correct address has been supplied by the directory service, the mail is returned to USPS custody and delivered in the appropriate manner, or delivery may be made by officials of the military installation.
4. Parcel Post
Deliver ordinary parcel post in the same manner as other mail.
5. Special Delivery and Express Mail
Provide Special Delivery and Express Mail service to the same delivery points as other mail.
6. Accountable Mail
a. Where agreements authorizing the military to handle accountable mail have been made, accountable mail addressed to individuals or organizations that receive their mail from the military after delivery in bulk, will be delivered in bulk to the same delivery point as other mail, assuming any required payments are made. In the absence of the necessary agreements, or if required payments are not made, leave notices at the appropriate delivery point for transmission to the addressee.
b. Where bulk delivery of accountable mail is made, list the items as required on Form 3883, Firm Delivery Book.
c. Where the Postal Service provides delivery to civilian businesses, family quarters and apartment type bachelor quarters, attempt to deliver accountable mail to the addressee at the door. If the attempt is unsuccessful, a notice will be left.
d. For purposes of this provision, accountable mail consists of numbered insured, certified, registered, COD, customs and postage due mail.
7. Marking Up and Forwarding Mail
a. Where bulk delivery is made, the military or the civilian business will be responsible for marking up and forwarding mail in accordance with postal regulations.
b. Where the Postal Service provides delivery service to individual receptacles, the Postal Service will be responsible for marking up and forwarding mail.
8. Post Offices Providing Neither City nor Rural Delivery
At post offices with no city or rural delivery service, the military may arrange to pick up the mail in bulk and disseminate it to the addressees.
II. Collection Service
A. Policy
Collection boxes should be provided on all military installations receiving city delivery service.
B. Collection Box Locations
1. Major Administrative Areas
Install collection boxes where the greatest mail volume is generated and where boxes are convenient to the greatest number of administrative offices.
2. Civilian Business Areas
Install a collection box in front of or adjacent to the base/post exchange or commissary accessible to the greatest number of civilian or military personnel using the facilities in the area.
3. Troop Areas
If collection boxes in the troop living areas are about 1 mile apart, the density of these boxes is considered to be adequate. Additional collection boxes should be placed in front or adjacent to consolidated mess halls to ensure they are accessible to the greatest number of military personnel.
4. Family Quarters Area
Collection boxes should be located throughout the areas as needed. As a general guide, placements at 1 mile apart are considered to be adequate. They should not be placed in areas receiving motorized delivery to curbside boxes or delivery to centralized delivery points.
C. Frequency of Collection
1. Major Administrative and Civilian Business Areas
a. Monday through Friday. Schedule at least one collection daily as late as possible, but not later than 5:00 p.m.
b. Saturday. Schedule a collection as late as possible in the day but not earlier than 1 p.m. If the administrative offices are regularly closed on Saturday, do not schedule a collection in the administrative area.
c. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
2. Troop Areas
a. Monday through Friday. Schedule one collection a day usually to coincide with a collection in the administrative area.
b. Saturday. Schedule collection as late as possible in the day but not earlier than 1 p.m.
c. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
3. Family Quarter Areas
a. Monday though Saturday. Schedule one collection a day to be made as the letter carrier passes the collection box during the normal course of deliveries.
b. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
D. Removal of Collection Boxes
Collection boxes may be removed if a box in any area averages less than 25 pieces per collection day.
Ill. Mail Processing
A. Policy
Distribute mail to military installations by separations which are practical, mutually agreeable to the officials of the military installation and MSC Postmaster concerned, and consistent with the USPS policy to provide the military with service commensurate to that provided the civilian population of the United States.
B. Distribution Procedures
1. Official Military and Civilian Business Mail
a. Sort official military mail to principal commands.
b. Sort civilian mail to individual functional entities (e.g., credit union, Red Cross).
2. Basic Units
a. Sort official and personal mail to basic units consisting of approximately 200 personnel, or numbered boxes in groups of approximately 200 so far as practicable and mutually agreeable to the military authorities and MSC Postmaster.
b. Unique sortations are acceptable if they are mutually agreeable with the military authorities and MSC Postmaster.
3. Residential Mail
a. Mail for apartment type bachelor quarters may be sorted to street name and building number.
b. Sort mail for non-apartment type bachelor quarters to a single separation.
c. Sort mail for family quarters by address into separations for subsequent carrier handling.
4. Basic Operating Concepts
a. No distribution will be provided to departments or offices within a principal command.
b. The depth of the sortation provided will be determined by volume, density, addressing method, and situations unique to the installation.
c. When the MSC Postmaster determines that sortation to basic military units is not practical, the requesting military official will be provided an explanation.
d. In instances where officials of the military installation and MSC Postmaster cannot agree upon the level of sortation to be provided, the matter will be referred by the MSC Postmaster through normal channels to Postal Service Headquarters for resolution.
IV. Retail Services
A. Policy
The Postal Service will provide convenient and effective retail services on military installations commensurate with those provided comparable civilian communities. The MSC Postmaster and the installation commander will share responsibility for providing retail services.
B. Responsibilities
1. The MSC Postmaster will:
a. Determine the level of service required.
b. Select the appropriate type(s) of retail units needed.
c. Provide for the cleaning and staffing of classified retail units.
d. Establish appropriate hours of service.
e. Provide retail services that are convenient for the majority of the people who live and work on the installation.
2. The Military will:
a. Provide conveniently located, adequate and safe facilities to house the retail units.
b. Provide security.
c. Consult with postal officials to resolve issues relating to postal service.
C. Types of Retail Units and Services Offered
The following are the various types of retail units listed in descending order and the various levels of service offered:
1. Classified Stations/Branches: All retail services. In addition post office box service may be provided.
2. Contract Stations/Branches: Basic retail and postal services as specified by contract. In addition post office box service may be provided.
3. Self Service Postal Centers: Stamps, envelopes, parcel mailing, if equipped with acceptance unit and currency and coin changer.
4. Multi-Commodity Vending Machine: Stamps, envelopes, postal cards and minimum fee insurance.
5. Stamp Booklet Vending Machine: Vend books of stamps.
6. Stamp Vending Machine: Vend single or multiple number of stamps from coils.
E. Deployment of Retail Units
The number and type(s) of retail units that will be deployed on a military installation will be based upon:
1. Population of installation on normal workday. This population includes military personnel, dependents, civilian workers, and other authorized personnel obtaining services on the installation.
2. Projected use of unit(s) - number of customers served, number and types of transactions, and revenue.
3. Physical layout of the installation. For example, two installations may have the same population, however, on one installation the population is centered in one general area, whereas on the other installation there are several population centers that are miles apart. Therefore, the number of retail units required to serve the latter may be greater than the first installation.
4. Distance to the nearest post office that is not on the installation.
F. Basic Deployment Criteria
1. The deployment of classified or contract stations or branches on military installations will be addressed on a case-by-case basis considering the specific needs and characteristics of the installation.
2. The following are basic deployment criteria for the various types of self service retail units. These criteria are flexible to the extent that if a particular military installation fails to meet the established population and revenue criteria and there is clearly a need for a self service unit, discretion should be exercised to provide the self service unit(s) appropriate to the circumstances.
Note: An Area Maintenance Officer must be available in the area.
Type Self Service Unit
Population
Revenue per Annum
SSPC
5,001 & Up
$30,001 -&- UP
Multi-Commodity Vending Machine
1,501 & Up
$ 9,001 -&- UP
Stamp Booklet Vending Machine
1,501 & Up
$ 9,001 -&- UP
Stamp Vending Machine
Under 1,500
Under $ 9,000
V. Implementation
A. These guidelines outline the levels of service available to military installations. The Postal Service recognizes that some military installations are receiving levels of service that exceed these guidelines. Therefore, local management must not make any changes which would reduce the present levels of service to conform to these guidelines without USPS Headquarters approval.
B. Effective July 1, 1983, new service provided to military installations must not exceed these guidelines except as in VI. These guidelines also serve to rescind USPS Headquarters letter of March 23, 1982, subject: Service to Military Installations.
VI. Request for Service That Exceeds These Guidelines
In some instances military installations may request levels of service which exceed these guidelines. The MSC Postmaster may negotiate with the military to provide the requested service in exchange for adjustments in the present levels of service (collections, distribution, delivery and retail service) or converting door or curbline delivery to centralized delivery. The District Manager or designee must approve all such conversions. The carrier hours saved must be at least sufficient to offset the additional hours to be expended for the new service.
VIl. Follow Up
A. For the remainder of PFY 1983 and PFY 1984, MSC Postmasters must provide USPS Headquarters, through normal channels, a report of all service adjustments as they occur.
B. The report must be submitted not later than 5 days after a final decision is made in the matter,
C. The report must contain the following:
1. Military installation name and ZIP Code.
2. The post office name and ZIP Code.
3. The action requested, by whom, and date of request.
4. The resolution and effective date of the adjustments.
5. The Cost/Savings expressed in workhours by craft and dollar value.

Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group

Appendix C: Resources
Purpose
The purpose of this appendix is to provide handy references for your postal operation and to the customers you support. Not every available source is listed. Please add to the list others sources you routinely use.
Manuals, Handbooks, Publications, Forms
The following USPS documents and forms may be good resources for both USPS managers and Department of Defense managers.
Many of these documents are available on the corporate intranet at click on "Information," then "Policies and Procedures," then the type of document, then either "By Document ID Number" or "By Title," and then scroll down to the desired document and/or on the Internet at click on the "Business" tab, then "Get Info," then "Postal Periodicals and Publications," then on the type of document (for example, "Handbooks" or "Publications", and then scroll down to the desired document). (All administrative computers in Associate Office Infrastructure (AOI) sites and all Delivery Unit Computer sites have access to the corporate intranet.)

Document Title
Doc ID
Address Change Service
Pub 8
Address Information Systems Products and Services
Pub 40
Addressing for Success
Pub 221
Administrative Support Manual
ASM
Automation and Retail Equipment
Pub 150
Consumer and Business Guide to Preventing Mail Fraud
Pub 300-A
Consumer's Guide to Postal Rates and Fees
Pub 123
Consumer's Guide to Postal Services & Products
Pub 201
Customer Guide to Filing Domestic Claims or Registered Mail Inquiries
Pub 122
Customer Guide to Filing Inquiries and Claims on International Mail
Pub 122-A
Delivery Confirmation Technical Guide
Pub 91
Designing Flat Mail
Pub 63
Designing Letter Mail
Pub 25
Designing Reply Mail
Pub 353
Directives and Forms Catalog
Pub 223
Domestic Mail Manual
DMM
Glossary of Postal Terms
Pub 32
Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations
Pub 38-A
Hazardous, Restricted, and Perishable Mail
Pub 52
History of the Postal Inspection Service
Pub 259
International Mail Manual
IMM
International Postal Rates and Fees
Pub 51
Mail Transportation Contracting Guide
Pub 33
Metering Your Mail
Pub 125
Packaging for Mailing
Pub 2
Packaging Pointers
Pos 74
Postal Addressing Standards
Pub 28
Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense
Pub 38
Postal Crime Prevention: A Guide for Businesses
Pub 301
Postal Employee Crime Prevention
Pub 302
Postal Explorer User Guide
Pub 821
Postal Operations Manual
POM
Preparing Standard Mail (A)
Pub 49
Priority Mail
Pub 20
Procedures for Mailer Applications
Hbk DM-701
Prohibitions and Restrictions on Mailing Animals, Plants, and Related Matter
Pub 14
Purchasing Manual
PM
Quick Service Guide
Pub 95
Some Things Were Never Meant To Be Mailed
Not 107
Supply and Equipment Catalog
Pub 247
Understanding the Private Express Statutes
Pub 542
USPS Tag Guide
Pub 23-A

Form Title
Doc ID
Address File Standardization on Diskette
PS 5603
Application and Voucher for Refund of Postage and Fees
PS 3533
CAPS Application Form
PS 6001*
Debit Authorization Form
PS 6003*
Local Account Information Form
PS 6002*
Local Setting of Postage Meter Licensed at Another Office
PS 3618
National Five-Digit Zip Code & Post Office Directory Order Form for Mail Order Use
PS 4243
Postage Meter Activity Report
PS 3601-C
Postage Statement-Regular Standard Mail-Permit Imprint
PS 3602-R
Zip+4 Code State Directory Order Form for Mail Order Use
PS 4242

* PS Forms 6001, 6002, and 6003 are accessible on the Internet at click on the "Business" tab, then "Get Info," then "Forms," then "Centralized Automated Payment System (CAPS," and then on the desired form).
Other Available Documents
The following documents can be accessed from the NCSC web site at www.usps.com/ncsc/products/products.htm#publications.
a. Address Information System (AIS) Products Technical Guide (including AIS Products Order Form).
b. Address List Management System (ALMS) Training Guide.
c. TIGER/ZIP Technical Guide.
d. Z4Change Technical Guide.
e. ZIPMove Technical Guide.
Equipment and Supplies
Postal equipment and supplies are found in Publication 247, Supply and Equipment Catalog. It contains instructions for ordering, gives specification information and stock numbers on products, lists obsolete or discontinued items, and provides an index by description, PSIN (Postal Service Item Number), and stock number.
This catalog is available in several formats:
a. Paper. Requisition paper copies through the MDC as follows:
(1) Use Touch Tone Order Entry by calling 1-800-332-0317, option 1, then option 2. (Select Quick Pick 226, or enter SN 7610-02-000-7982.)
(2) Send an F3Fill-completed PS Form 7380 by cc:Mail to MDC Customer Service @ TOKS001L.
(3) Mail a completed PS Form 7380 to the following address:
SUPPLY REQUISITIONS
500 SW MONTARA PKWY
TOPEKA KS 66624-9702
b. CD-ROM. The CD-ROM version of Publication 247 is called the National Electronic Catalog and is available through Materials Customer Service (MCS) at 1-800-332-0317. It is also available on the CD-ROM version of Postal Explorer.
c. Online. Corporate intranet access is available at the following address: http://blue.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/pubs/pub247/247tc.pdf.
Web Addresses
Web addresses change periodically. Please note any changes you encounter. Remember to modify any "bookmarks" (short cuts to frequently used web sites) for web addresses that change.
The web addresses listed below are generally available to the public. Additional web sites are available to postal officials for official business through the corporate intranet at All administrative computers in Associate Office Infrastructure (AOI sites and all Delivery Unit Computer sites have access to the corporate intranet.) For further information, contact your district Information Systems manager.
U.S. Postal Service
http://caps.usps.gov - Link to the Centralized Automated Payment System (CAPS) home page, with further links to Overview, Services and Supplies, Q & A, Account Inquiry, Account Inquiry Help, and Forms.
http://pe.usps.gov - Link to Postal Explorer, a virtual library of postal information designed for business mailers, including document searches of the DMM and IMM.
http://ribbs.usps.gov - Link to the Rapid Information Bulletin Board System (RIBBS) home page, which contains links to addressing, business forms, classification reform, calendar and events, Federal Register notices, weather updates, and much more.
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files - Link to address change service (ACS), address quality services, coding accuracy support system (CASS) computerized delivery sequence (CDS), track/confirm, Global Delivery Services, etc.
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files/addressing - Find military address information, USPS addressing publication links, sample addresses, and more.
http://es.usps.com - Link to the U.S. Postal Service home page. (Please note that the U.S. Postal Service can also be reached at http://www.usps.gov.)
http://es.usps.com/cpim/pubsbus2.htm - Find business periodicals and publications fast. This also provides a link to the Postal Bulletin, Memo to Mailers, Mailers Companion, Quick Service Guides, and Postal Explorer.
http://www.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/bulletin/pb.htm - Link to the Postal Bulletin home page.
http://www.usps.gov/ncsc - Link to National Customers Support Center for products, services, publications, certification programs, ZIP Code Lookup, and Address Information.
Military Postal Service Agency
http://www.hqda.army.mil/mpsa - Link to the Military Postal Service Agency (MPSA), which ensures movement of military mail worldwide to authorized users of the military postal system and is an official extension of the U.S. Postal Service outside the United States.
Department of Defense OMM@hqda.army.mil - The e-mail address for the Department of Defense Official Mail Manager, MPSA for inquiries for official mail concerns on domestic official mail.
Vendors
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files/vendors - This site identifies vendors and highlights their programs and/or products.
GSA
http://policyworks.gov/FEDMAIL - Learn how GSA works with Federal agencies to develop, evaluate, and advocate policies and guidelines to improve mail management and the rapid handling and accurate delivery of mail at the lowest possible cost.
Affiliations/Conferences
Postal Customer Council Program (PCC)
The Postal Customer Council Program (PCC) is a national program that provides mailers with a forum for exchanging ideas for improved mail service and discussing new and existing USPS products, programs, regulations, and procedures. Customers can learn about the latest technology, equipment, and software, discuss matters of mutual concern, get answers to questions, voice opinions, make suggestions, and receive explanations on new programs. Contact your local USPS account representative or business center for information and assistance.
Mailers Technical Advisory Committee (MTAC)
The Mailers Technical Advisory Committee (MTAC) is a group of mailing industry representatives and USPS officials that provides technical information, advice, and recommendations about postal services, programs, regulations, and requirements. The members represent associations of large and small commercial mailing organizations, related mailing services, and various industry groups.
National Postal Forum
The National Postal Forum is a conference of postal management, major business mailers, and suppliers of postal products and systems who discuss common problems and solutions and also changes in mailing standards and mailing technologies. The Forum meets semi-annually for several days and provides business sessions, numerous networking opportunities, and an exhibition area displaying the latest in products and services. For more information, contact your local USPS account representative or business center, or http://www.npf.org.
The MPSA Official Mail Manager Workshop
The MPSA Official Mail Manager Workshop sponsors training for all Department of Defense activities, and it is also open to all Federal agencies. Training includes basic technical postal information including the following topics:
a. Reducing postage costs.
b. Computing postage.
c. Classes of mail.
d. Special services.
e. Postage meter management.
f. USPS automation.
g. Private Express Statutes.
For more information, call 703-325-0674, fax a request to 703-325-9534, or send an e-mail Department of Defense OMM@hqda.army.mil.
GSA Interagency Mail Policy Council
The Interagency Mail Policy Council (IMPC) is a collaborative effort of all Federal agencies based on new initiatives to develop the best regulations, policies, and options for Federal agency mail management and distribution.

MAIL COM

MAIL COM is a semi-annual educational conference and exhibition sponsored by MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution, and the Mail Systems Management Association (MSMA). MAIL COM offers business mailers numerous educational sessions, networking opportunities, and an exhibit area displaying the latest in products and services. For more information, contact your local MSMA chapter or MAIL COM directly at the following address:
MAIL COM
PO BOX 441
BRADLEY BEACH NJ 07720
Training
Local Training
The official mail manager on a military installation may have formal training available. Contact the official mail manager to inquire about availability and installation orientation opportunities.
Professional/Private Corporation Publications (Newsletters, Magazines, Papers)
Mailers Companion
The Mailers Companion is a free monthly newsletter for USPS personnel and business mailers. It offers the latest USPS information essential to effective mailings, and also includes information on Domestic Mail Manual revisions, classification reform, mail processing networks, address management, technology, mailing standards, rulings, and other relevant issues, as well as a column for readers' questions and comments. (It was formerly known as the Mailroom Companion.)
Memo to Mailers
Memo to Mailers is an official USPS publication announcing new programs, ideas, technology improvements, etc.
MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution
MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution presents diverse postal-related topics covering upcoming postal events, personnel initiatives, USPS automation efforts, Internet enhancements of the work environment, and much more. It also contains a comprehensive resource section.
Mailing and Systems Technology (MAST)
Mailing and Systems Technology (MAST) is another diverse postal-related publication covering a multitude of issues from purchasing products, services, and equipment, to support operations and mail service providers. It also furnishes insight into personnel issues, such as roles of supervisors and managers, safety in the workplace, and training. It also contains product profiles and technology updates.
Office Systems 90
Office Systems 90 provides a variety of information on technology, mailroom efficiency, product and equipment reviews, and resources. It also has personnel related topics for managers and employees.
Postal World
Postal World is the original and leading biweekly independent newsletter for business mailers (25 issues/year, $387/year). It features reports about mail center operations of all kinds as well as mail regulations and private carriers. It focuses on reducing costs, boosting services, and upgrading mail personnel status within an organization. For more information (including how to obtain a free trial of Postal World), see its web site at http://www.zip.ucg.com/news_mag.html.

Appendix D: Glossary
This glossary provides definitions to military terms that may be used by Department of Defense representatives in their dealings with the U.S. Postal Service. Although these terms may vary from one military branch to another, they should be useful in clarifying special situations that may arise. This glossary is provided as a general reference tool rather than as a source of definitions for terms used within this handbook.

Adjutant General's Office - the office on an Army base responsible for delivery of mail to military personnel in dormitories and barracks. Officials from the Adjutant General's Office should contact the U.S. Postal Service if there are any problems with mail to these customers.
APO/FPO Mail - domestic mail and international mail that bears a U.S. military delivery address or return address and that, in some stage of its transmission, is in the possession of the Department of Defense . This is mail that is being sent to or received from military installations located outside the Continental United States (CONUS). This mail may be official or personal in nature. This mail is centralized at certain locations such as San Francisco and New York for transport overseas. When mail is received in the CONUS from these facilities, letter mail is normally received in sleeved half trays, flats are received in sleeved plastic flat tubs, and parcels are received in #1 sacks.
BITC - acronym for "base information transfer center," which is the Department of Defense mail center on Air Force bases. The BITC handles and meters official mail.
centralized mail metering facility - a facility that collects official mail from a group of Department of Defense installations in a specified area. This facility packages mail into presort or other groupings to reduce postage costs. It also maintains individual mail counts on the mail presented by each Department of Defense installations. Such a facility is generally staffed by GSA employees. Currently, the Navy is the only branch to use such facilities.
consolidated mail - outgoing official non-time-critical First-Class Mail that is accumulated at the base Department of Defense mail center and consolidated into one Priority Mail package for shipping. Consolidated mail must be clearly labeled as such by the dispatching office. Consolidation can occur daily, weekly, or anything in between. Consolidation at destinating offices are to be based on normal routing volumes.
DOIM - acronym for "Department of Information Management," which is the Department of Defense mail center on an Army base. The DOIM handles and meters official mail.
family housing - individual quarters designed for military personnel and their families. By agreement, the U.S. Postal Service provides city delivery service for these quarters. The Department of Defense installation is responsible for the maintenance of the mailboxes.
guard mail - term used on Marine Corps bases and some Navy bases to describe interoffice mail.
gunner - the Marine Corps warrant officer usually responsible for mail services on a Marine Corps installation.
Holy Joe - term used on Army bases to describe interoffice mail. This term is derived from the envelopes frequently used for such mail - they have a series of holes on the front and back.
military mail manager - the manager who is responsible for the mailroom on a Department of Defense installation and who handles official mail on that installation. On Air Force and Marine Corps installations, this individual is usually an enlisted person, and on Army installations, it is normally a GSA employee.
MPSA - acronym for "Military Postal Service Agency," a Department of Defense combined operation that is responsible for official military mail domestically and the APO/FPO system overseas. All four branches of the military contribute personnel to the MPSA, which has responsibility for official mail for all four branches. For APO/FPO mail, MPSA has one subsidiary organization for the Pacific theater and another for the European theater.
Provost Marshall - the office on an Army installation responsible for physical base security through police administration.
PSC - acronym for "postal service center," a centralized mailroom containing post office box style deliveries normally served by a contractor. This type of delivery is used primarily for permanent party dormitory housing primarily on Air Force and Navy installations. Many times, the PSC contractor also provides base locator service to redirect mail for newly arrived personnel or as a central location to identify the location of an individual on base.
schools - on many Department of Defense installations, training programs that may last from several weeks to several months. It is critical that all students be given their correct street mailing address. The failure to use proper street addressing for these customers results in most complaints of non-delivery.
secure mail - mail matter that contains information classified as "Secret." By regulation this mail is registered or sent via Federal Express. In this circumstance, mail may be registered with no intrinsic value.
TDY - acronym for "temporary duty" at another location. When military personnel are on TDY, the Department of Defense is responsible for holding the mail or forwarding it to the individual's new duty station.


Post Offices Serving Department of Defense Installations
Handbook PO-630 April 2000


Post Offices Serving Department of Defense Installations
Handbook PO-630 April 2000
A. Explanation. This handbook provides information and guidance to postmasters and station managers of post offices serving Department of Defense (Department of Defense ) installations. It is also designed to be utilized by military mail managers to understand postal concepts and to partner with their counterparts in the U.S. Postal Service. This handbook is subject to change based on user input.
B. Updates. This handbook will be updated as necessary.
C. Additional Copies. The initial release of this handbook is accessible on the Internet at http://es.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/po630.pdf. It is also accessible on the corporate intranet at click on "Information," then "Policies and Procedures," then "Handbooks," then either "By Document ID Number" or "By Title," and then scroll down to this handbook. The first printed edition is scheduled for release pending field input and review, and information for ordering additional copies will be provided at that time.
D. Comments on Content. Address comments or questions regarding the content of this handbook to:
OPERATIONS SYSTEMS - DELIVERY
US POSTAL SERVICE
475 L'ENFANT PLZ SW RM 7142
WASHINGTON DC 20260-2808
A. Comments on Format. Address comments or questions regarding the language or organization of this handbook to:
INFORMATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
US POSTAL SERVICE
475 L'ENFANT PLZ SW RM 2800
WASHINGTON DC 20260-1540
E. Effective Date. This publication is effective April 2000.

John A. Rapp
Vice President
Delivery

1 Introduction
1-1 Purpose
The purpose of this handbook is to provide information about the mail community on Department of Defense (Department of Defense ) installations to the postmaster or station manager and to the clerks and carriers. It also provides information to the Department of Defense mail manager and to the associated Department of Defense mail offices on how the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) operates, as well as providing specific information on automation, centralized delivery, organization, and address management.
This handbook is designed as a reference tool for the USPS and Department of Defense communities. It should be kept readily available for reference when problems arise, or for questions on the Department of Defense 's chain of command or what office should be consulted for support and assistance. This handbook will help the USPS managers, as valued members of the Department of Defense community, to understand their role in that community and what their responsibilities are. Success as a manager of a U.S. Post Office on a Department of Defense installation does not require previous military service; however, it is essential to understand the military's chain of command and understand how to be successful in that community.
1-2 Working Together
The relationship between the U.S. Postal Service and the respective Department of Defense installations is a partnership, with varying levels of benefit and responsibility. At many installations, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense mail center are located in the same building. Even though these two organizations may be close physically, they still need to communicate directly and to work together to better serve their mutual customers and create "win-win" resolutions to common problems.
Both the U.S. Postal Service and the installation's Department of Defense mail center serve essentially the same customer - the Department of Defense community. The U.S. Postal Service does this by providing individual box service to those customers who desire it, city delivery service to family housing areas, and bulk delivery of mail to military administrative offices and unaccompanied military personnel. The local post office on the installation accumulates mail for the military installation and distributes it in bulk to the Department of Defense mail center, which then distributes and delivers it. Thus, USPS operations have a significant impact on when and how mail is delivered on the installation.
You should take the initiative and understand the synergy and interrelationships that ultimately provide mail service to the Department of Defense community. By establishing a good working relationship, you will gain a better understanding of working together and how each group can benefit the other to improve customer service while minimizing cost. Each manager should tour the local Department of Defense mail center and understand its workload, mail flows, and work processes. Conversely, invite the Department of Defense mail manager to visit the USPS facility to gain knowledge on operations, schedules, and workload.
This handbook is an official publication of the U.S. Postal Service and should be referred to in the management of a postal facility on a Department of Defense installation served by the U.S. Postal Service. However, Publication 38-A contains the guidelines for managing post office operations on Department of Defense installations.

2 The USPS/Department of Defense Relationship
2-1 Background
On February 2, 1959, the Department of Defense and the Post Office Department executed an Interagency Agreement. The Agreement was comprehensive in scope, addressing all aspects of mail service to military personnel serving in the United States and abroad. (There had been two previous Interagency Agreements, one executed in 1927 and one executed in 1950, but neither one had been comprehensive in scope.) In the Agreement, the Post Office Department agreed to do the following:
a. "Provide postal services for the Armed Forces in areas where the U.S. civil postal service operates, to include the establishment of civil post offices on military installations and the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services, consistent with U.S. postal laws and regulations, normal standards of the Post Office Department, and changing military requirements;
b. "Provide the equipment and furniture necessary for the operation of civil post offices located on military installations."
However, the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970, which created a quasi-independent U.S. Postal Service, voided the 1959 Interagency Agreement and dramatically changed the relationship between the two parties. This legislation, which became effective January 1, 1971, directed the Department of Defense to cease Military Postal Service operations in areas served by the U.S. Postal Service and required the two parties to negotiate a new agreement - a process that required numerous years.
On January 11, 1980, the General Accounting Office Report LCD-80-2, How Military Postal Service Operations Can Be Improved, stated that negotiations were deadlocked over four issues, one of them being the level of domestic services that the U.S. Postal Service would provide to the Department of Defense . The Department of Defense wanted the U.S. Postal Service to provide military barracks and bachelor quarters with locking mailboxes similar to those provided to civilian apartment houses. However, the U.S. Postal Service wanted to deliver mail to military barracks and bachelor quarters in bulk form because it considered such quarters similar to civilian dormitories and residence halls, which receive mail in bulk form. The U.S. Postal Service believed that delivery service to military quarters should not exceed the level of service provided to similar groups of civilian residential customers.
2-2 Publication 38
On February 21, 1980, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense signed an agreement in which the U.S. Postal Service agreed to furnish mail service to military installations in the continental United States commensurate with the delivery service provided for the civilian population of comparable characteristics. This agreement required establishing civilian post offices on military installations and providing the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services consistent with postal laws and regulations of the United States, normal standards of the U.S. Postal Service, and changing military requirements. However, the level of domestic mail delivery, which was one of the four deadlocked issues, was not included in the agreement.
On February 22, 1980, the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense signed a supplemental agreement concerning administrative details. In this supplemental agreement, the two parties agreed to use USPS criteria in considering extensions of delivery service. This agreement also specifies that mail will be delivered in bulk as follows:
a. To principal administrative buildings or commands.
b. To personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less.
c. For individuals in basic units where criteria will not allow free delivery service to be established or extended. However, in locations with adjacent civilian communities having delivery service, the U.S. Postal Service agreed to submit proposals to the Department of Defense to furnish service to groups of receptacles consistent with mutually agreed criteria and funding.
Furthermore, the Department of Defense agreed to deliver mail to personnel in a temporary duty status, in training, and where delivery requirements exceeded U.S. Postal Service standards. The U.S. Postal Service agreed to maintain change of address forms and endorse forwardable mail that is undeliverable as addressed where they deliver the mail.
The U.S. Postal Service published this agreement and supplemental agreement as Publication 38, Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense.
2-3 Publication 38-A
In June 1983, the U.S. Postal Service published Publication 38-A, Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations. This publication establishes the policy of the U.S. Postal Service in implementing the joint agreement stated in Publication 38. This document contains the following general policy statement:
"Mail delivery service on military installations in the United States should be commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided civilian communities of comparable characteristics."
This statement is in accordance with Publication 38. However, the interpretation of this sentence has varied from site to site. This difference in interpretations made by the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense is an ongoing source of concern for the two organizations. The U.S. Postal Service views these installations as being similar to universities, while the Department of Defense views them as small cities. The policy of the U.S. Postal Service is to provide a level of service to Department of Defense customers commensurate with that to a small college or university rather than that to a small city.
Much of the rest of the document contains restrictions that also effectively limit that policy statement. For instance, Publication 38-A contains the following statement:
"Deliver official mail addressed to principal commands on military installations in bulk. Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or military units are housed in a single building, deliver all mail to a central point in the building."
However, the delivery service provided on Department of Defense installations depends upon the type of mail being received, the type of organization receiving the mail, and, in the case of personal mail, the status of the individual and the type of housing in which the individual resides.
The U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense still do not agree as to the commensurate level of service as enumerated in Publication 38-A. A current working group composed of representatives of the Military Postal Service Agency and the U.S. Postal Service has been established to review Publication 38-A and possibly revise this document to allow for the change in postal organization and the business needs of the two parties.
Nevertheless, the guidelines in the current Publication 38-A still determine the local delivery relationship. Section VI discusses situations in which changes in this delivery relationship can be made. Each situation must be viewed on its individual merits, and changes should be made when they are mutually beneficial to both parties. However, changes to the published guidelines can be negotiated and approved only through the Office of Delivery Policies and Programs, Delivery, Headquarters.
2-4 Proper Street Addressing
One reason the U.S. Postal Service delivers mail to the Department of Defense in bulk is that military addresses are often incompatible with automation and addressing efforts and, therefore, such mail cannot be sorted efficiently and delivered promptly to the intended recipient.
In 1988, Postmaster General Anthony Frank personally approved the inclusion of the Department of Defense ZIP+4 Codes in the Postal Service's ZIP+4 File. This file is now part of the Address Management System database, which is the basis for all automated mail processing decisions and is used by mailers to qualify for automation-based postage discounts. However, it was later discovered that most Department of Defense addresses could not be put into the database because they did not include street addresses or post office boxes.
On October 2, 1990, the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Production and Logistics published a policy requiring buildings on Department of Defense installations to be renumbered in street address sequence. On November 5, 1990, the Military Postal Service Agency memorandum entitled Address and ZIP+4 Codes published instructions necessary to carry out the policy. This policy has been accomplished in varying stages among the various military branches and on individual bases.
When a Department of Defense installation has renumbered its buildings in street address sequence, the U.S. Postal Service manager at the branch post office must work with the Address Management staff at the local district to conduct an audit and validate that the new street addressing is actually proper. Once the street addressing has been validated, it is critical that it be used for all addressing functions on base. This requires a significant change in procedures for the installation - using street addresses rather than building numbers for delivery, references, and directions on base. It also carries a substantial cost for the installation - new signage on all facilities, new street signs, changes in base telephone and business directories, notification of correspondents, etc. But it also has a significant benefit: when Department of Defense installations have proper street addressing, the U.S. Postal Service can use automated mail processing equipment to sort the mail and deliver it more easily and efficiently.
2-5 Reviewing Delivery Services
Inherent with the move to street addressing was the implied benefit of letter mail being processed to a finer depth of sort. Combined with the reduction of manual clerical distribution, this can add value to both postal and military mail operations. Department of Defense installations that established proper street addressing programs also often requested increased delivery services from the U.S. Postal Service. However, in 1992, the U.S. Postal Service stated that it believed that the service provided to the Department of Defense was at least equal to, and in many instances surpassed, the service provided to comparable civilian customers, and it indicated that it would not provide increased delivery service.
On May 25, 1993, a Military Postal Service Agency-Official Mail Manager memorandum entitled Address Standardization/USPS Delivery to Street Addresses announced the formation of a working group to develop a unified Department of Defense position/strategy regarding the USPS domestic delivery issue. The working group received the following input on delivery:
a. The U.S. Air Force indicated a desire for the U.S. Postal Service to deliver only to building mailrooms, Postal Service Centers (PSCs), or activity distribution offices, and it noted that the average Air Force base has approximately 80 business mail delivery points. The U.S. Air Force also proposed that the U.S. Postal Service not be asked to provide additional deliveries until the servicing postal activity has automated equipment in place to sort the mail.
b. The U.S. Navy said that the working group should first focus on the type of delivery the U.S. Postal Service will provide as a minimum on military installations. After minimum delivery standards have been agreed to, the individual services and their field activities should have the discretion to determine the extent of mail delivery on their installations. The U.S. Navy also indicated that it wants the U.S. Postal Service to deliver mail to unaccompanied housing.
The working group met several times and decided to conduct a one-time survey of Department of Defense installations and affiliated agencies to determine volumes of incoming and outgoing mail, postage revenue generated, current delivery arrangements, and desired delivery arrangements.
In June 1994, the Military Postal Service Agency sent to the U.S. Postal Service a proposed revised Department of Defense /USPS agreement asking for mail to be delivered as addressed. In 1996 the USPS and the Department of Defense conducted a joint survey at representative bases from all branches of the military community to determine the current cost and scope of military mail services provided on base. This study determined the relative cost of providing mail services by the four military branches and informed the U.S. Postal Service as to how the Department of Defense provides basic mail services. As a result of this survey, the U.S. Postal Service informed the Department of Defense that the U.S. Postal Service would not change existing policy and delivery in general to Department of Defense installations.
In October 1998, a Military Operations Review was conducted at offices that participated in the 1996 survey as well as at additional representative offices. This review identified systemic operational inefficiencies at representative Department of Defense installations. Among the recommendations of this review were the following:
a. Improve Department of Defense addressing to meet USPS addressing standards for automation.
b. Implement letter mail automation where sufficient letter mail volumes and sufficient opportunities for decreasing manual letter mail operations are present.
Through these processes, postal manual processing costs could be reduced, and Department of Defense costs to sort this mail upon presentation could also be reduced. This review also revealed that the communication levels between the postmaster/station manager at the branch post office on the installation and the Department of Defense mail manager were minimal. Such low communication levels prevent problem-resolution at its lowest levels, and can create situations in which the Department of Defense customers are not provided prompt, efficient service. However, by establishing an on-going communication channel, USPS distribution efforts can be focused to prepare the mails at the time and in the format needed by the Department of Defense mail center.
A current working group composed of representatives of the Military Postal Service Agency and the U.S. Postal Service is examining how the two groups can work more closely together, share expertise, and improve efficiencies by both parties. Although they have narrowed their differences, the groups have significant differences in their expectations of delivery service levels.
Prior to implementing any increase in delivery service levels, local management needs to consult the district manager of Operations Programs Support and the manager of Post Office Operations. If necessary, local management can contact the area manager of Delivery Programs Support. The final authority For these types of decisions is the manager of Delivery Policies and Programs at U.S. Postal Service Headquarters.

3 Protocol
3-1 Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the organization structure of the various Department of Defense installations, so that the USPS community will know whom to contact to resolve various situations and problems that might arise. It also provides an overview of the current USPS organizational structure to help the military community in its dealings with the U.S. Postal Service. In order for our organizations to work together effectively, each organization must understand the composition of the other and the responsibilities of the various components.
3-2 Points of Contact on Military Installations
3-2.1 Overview
The Postal Service representative needs to contact different personnel on the Department of Defense installation for various issues. Although the titles of these personnel might differ on installations of various branches of the military, their roles are similar. See the chart in Exhibit 3-2.1a and the flowcharts in Exhibit 3-2.1b through e.
3-2.2 Mail Manager
The first person to contact regarding any mail issue on the installation is the installation's mail manager. This person is the equivalent of the base postmaster or station manager, and in many instances is a civilian with a specialty in mail services. This individual has the most knowledge of both official and personal mail operations on the installation and can assist you with any military mail issue. You should establish a good rapport and consult with this person frequently to take advantage of his or her contacts and knowledge. This person is usually a senior enlisted person (E7-E9) or civilian employee with a grade of about GS-9.
3-2.3 Mail Supervisor
The mail supervisor is the mail manager's immediate superior and supervises and oversees all mail operations on the installation. Contact this person if an issue cannot be resolved through the mail manager. This person usually has a rank of O4 or O5.
3-2.4 Supervisors of Other Areas
3-2.4.1 Facilities
The facilities supervisor is responsible for all facility issues on the installation, including family housing, facility maintenance issues, maintenance of centralized delivery equipment, and new construction/repair on carrier traveled streets. Maintaining contacts with this supervisor can make it easier to resolve many carrier street concerns and to plan for future change. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.2 Security
The security supervisor is responsible for all security issues on the installation, and coordinates facility alarm and other security issues. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.3 Vehicle Passes
The person responsible for issuing vehicle passes for employee vehicles and official mail vehicles might be the same as the security supervisor, or it might be another individual. Obtaining base access is one of the key issues for U.S. Postal Service employees. Generally, U.S. Postal Service employees reside off base, and the mail generally is processed off base, but both employees and the mail need to pass through the installation gates to provide efficient service. During times of heightened security, simply getting on and off base can be challenging. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.4.4 Surplus Government Equipment
Each installation has an individual responsible for supervising the submission and reissue of surplus government equipment. Some installations have a Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO) that manages surplus government equipment. As a governmental agency representative, the U.S. Postal Service may be able to receive surplus property before it is made available to the general public. Contact this individual or the DRMO if you are interested in obtaining and identifying usable office equipment and surplus government equipment for postal use. This person usually has a rank of O5.
3-2.5 Base Supervisor
The base supervisor oversees the individuals responsible for mail, facilities, security, etc. This person is generally the second-highest ranking officer on the base. Contact this person if an issue cannot be resolved through the supervisors involved. This person usually has a rank of O6.
3-2.6 Base Commander
The base commander is the highest ranking officer on the base. Contact this person when all other attempts to resolve issues at lower levels have failed. This person usually has a rank of O6 or O7.
Exhibit 3-2.1a: Points of Contacts at Department of Defense Installations

Title and Usual Rank/Grade of Individual

POSITION/ISSUE

AIR FORCE

ARMY

NAVY

MARINE CORPS

Mail Manager
Official mail manager
* E7-E9 or civilian employee (GS-9)
Official mail manager
* E7-E9 or civilian employee (GS-9)
Director of postal operations
* Civilian employee (GS-12)
Postal officer
* Warrant officer (W0-W4)


Mail Supervisor
Communications squadron commander
* Major (04) or lieutenant colonel (O5)
Department of information management
* Lieutenant Colonel (O5) or civilian employee (GM15)
Commanding officer (CO) of the Fleet Industrial Support Center (FISC)
* Captain (O6)
Supply and logistics (S-4)
* Major (O4).


Facilities
Civil engineering squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of counter intelligence and security
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of public works
* Civilian employee (GS-12)
Director of public works
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Security
Security forces squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of counter intelligence and security
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of security (Shore Patrol)
* Commander (05)
Military Police
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Vehicle Passes
Security forces squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Provost marshall
* Major (04) or lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of security (Shore Patrol)
* Commander (05)
Military Police
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)


Surplus Government Equipment
Supply squadron commander
* Lieutenant colonel (O5)
Director of logistics
* Lieutenant colonel (O5) or civilian employee (GM14 or GM13)
Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO)
Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO)


Base Supervisor
Support group commander
* Colonel (O6)
Garrison commander
* Colonel (O6)
N/A
Battalion commander
* Colonel (O6)


Base Commander
Wing commander
* Colonel (O6) or brigadier general (O7)
Installation commander
* Colonel (O6) or brigadier general (O7)
Installation commander
* Rear admiral (O7)
Installation commander
* Brigadier general (O7)

Exhibit 3-2.1b: Air Force Chain of Command
Not Available


Exhibit 3-2.1c: Army Chain of Command
Not Available

Exhibit 3-2.1d: Navy Chain of Command
Not Available

Exhibit 3-2.1e: Marine Corps Chain of Command
Not Available

3-3 Staff Meetings
One of the best ways to stay in touch with what is happening on the installation is to attend the weekly staff meetings hosted by the base commander. The postmaster can learn of up-coming events and changes in the military community that makes up his customer base, and this will help the postmaster plan programs and projects and make sound business decisions on staffing and other issues impacted by the military community. Attending these meetings will also give the postmaster an opportunity to make appropriate announcements regarding the post office and the customers on the installation.
3-4 Personal Mail
When the topic of mail is discussed with military authorities, the topic normally discussed is official mail. The resources and efforts of the Department of Defense installation are focused on administratively managing the facility and carrying on the governments business. The greatest volume of personal mail handled on base is delivered by the US Postal Service to the family housing areas. This personal mail is delivered by city letter carriers using postal vehicles, and wearing postal uniforms. In most cases, these carriers will work out of a post office on base. This can be an associate office or be the branch of a larger office.
Personal mail addressed to unaccompanied military personnel is not normally delivered by the U.S. Postal Service. This mail can be delivered to the work address, or delivered by military/government employee/contractor to a designated individual mail receptacle. The issue of the timely and private receipt of personal mail by unaccompanied military personnel is considered to be a "quality of life" issue by the Department of Defense and is of serious concern. The responsibility for this type of personal mail lies not with the official mail manager but with the Adjutant General's Office. In case of service problems or complaints, contact the official mail manager to determine what office has responsibility on each individual installation.
3-5 Chain of Command in the U.S. Postal Service
3-5.1 Station Manager
The station manager at the Department of Defense installation is the first point of contact for Department of Defense personnel on issues regarding mail delivery.
3-5.2 Postmaster
The postmaster is responsible for a geographic community. Department of Defense officials should address any postal problems, concerns, or changes regarding the military community to the postmaster. If the local post office on the installation is a station, all concerns should go through the station manager first. If the problem transcends the postmaster's authority or area of responsibility, he or she will forward the issue to the proper postal official.
3-5.3 Manager of Post Office Operations
A manager of post office operations (MPOO) is responsible for managing a large number of post offices and supervising the postmasters of those offices. MPOOs report directly to the district manager. Any change in service resulting in budgetary changes should be submitted by the postmaster through the MPOO.
3-5.4 District Manager
The district manager is the senior postal official in the district and is responsible for all offices in the district.
3-5.5 Area Vice President
The area vice president is the senior postal official in the area (the U.S. Postal Service has established ten areas throughout the United States). The area vice president reviews and approves facility plans for the districts under his or control.
3-5.6 Headquarters
Rather than being in the line of authority, USPS Headquarters in Washington, DC, provides support to all levels of the organization when problems arise or assistance is needed to resolve a situation.

Exhibit 3-5.1: U.S. Postal Service Chain of Command
Not Available


4 Military Mail Flows
4-1 Introduction
The flow of mail on military installations is significantly different from that in the U.S. Postal Service. On a military installation, USPS "mail" is only one part of the total workload. This chapter provides USPS managers an idea of the various kinds of military mails so that they can understand the role and interaction of USPS mail with the total military mail workload. By understanding this interaction, the USPS manager can determine the impacts and merge points of these two different operations, which will help the U.S. Postal Service and Department of Defense mail center work together in a more mutually beneficial way. For example, understanding this interaction can lead to a better knowledge of when outgoing mails are available from the major military customers so that postal transportation can be reviewed, consolidated, and possibly minimized.
Secondly, it is essential to understand the distinction that Department of Defense installations place on official mail versus personal mail. The Department of Defense is an organization whose primary mission is defending the citizens of this country. As such, it focuses on the administrative affairs that allow it to fulfill its mission. While both types of mail are important, Department of Defense places a higher emphasis on official mail. Department of Defense installations do not mix the handling of official mail and personal mail.
4-2 USPS Mail
The U.S. Postal Service delivers the mail to the USPS branch post office at the installation. Generally, the mail comes into the post office sorted by the military installation ZIP Code. Then USPS postal clerks manually sort/case this mail into a group of break-outs, which are finer sortations of the mail that may represent individual activities on the base or simply major commands. If the U.S. Postal Service prepares mail for the installation by Delivery Point Sequence (DPS), the USPS postal clerks may efficiently process the military mail in delivery order on automation equipment. Downstream handling can also be minimized through the use of flat break outs and phantom routes. Phantom routes are additional routes in the Address Management System database used for processing mail into finer sortations, particularly by customers using carrier route pre-sort. After the USPS postal clerks sort the mail, the branch post office delivers it to the Department of Defense mail center, which at many installations is located in the same building as the USPS branch post office but at some others is located in a separate building.
Once the Department of Defense mail center receives the mail, military postal clerks sort it to the exact military address. It is then handled in one of three ways:
a. The mail is transported to other military post offices for delivery to tentative commands/activities.
b. The mail is picked up by authorized unit mail clerks of individual commands.
c. The mail is sorted and finalized by delivery point so that it can be delivered directly to addressees or picked up by addressees.
At most Navy installations, incoming USPS mail is handled in one of two ways:
a. Mail is received at a USPS branch post office at the installation, and individual commands pick up their mail at this site.
b. The USPS delivers mail to a central Navy site that is then responsible for final distribution. In these cases, the Navy either delivers directly to addressees, or addressees pick up the mail from this site.
At most Air Force installations, the USPS branch post office at the installation delivers the incoming USPS mail to the Base Information Transfer System (BITS).
4-3 Consolidated Mail
The Department of Defense has developed a procedure to significantly reduce mailing costs by efficiently using Priority Mail. Mail that is going to other Department of Defense installations that is not time-critical is held in a rack or pouch system, rather than mailed as individual pieces at a single-piece rate. At set times (established by volume and delivery times), this mail is gathered together and condensed into an appropriate container, and this one article is sent by Priority Mail to the Department of Defense mail center at the appropriate Department of Defense installation. The Department of Defense mail center then routes the various pieces to the appropriate recipients. For this purpose, Department of Defense installations should have the toll-free number and web address to order Priority Mail pouches, boxes, and pre-addressed labels.
Military mail clerks at the Department of Defense mail center collect routine official correspondence or documents during the business day and review them prior to metering to see if they are destined for a location on the installation's consolidation list. They consolidate the appropriate mailpieces, address them to the commanding officer of that activity, and forward them under a single cover (up to the 70-pound maximum weight limit). They must endorse this mail "CONTAINS CONSOLIDATED CORRESPONDENCE" in large writing in the lower left quadrant of the address side of the container.
The Department of Defense mail center handles incoming/outgoing consolidated mail as described in the following sections.
4-3.1 Incoming
Upon receiving consolidated mail from other military installations, military postal clerks at the Department of Defense mail center open the article and distribute the mail to the individual commands.
4-3.2 Outgoing
The Department of Defense mail center is responsible for consolidating all outgoing correspondences of similar addresses to the same consolidation point, placing the mail in a bag, envelope or container, applying postage, and dispatching it to the U.S. Postal Service. If the mail is metered by the Department of Defense mail center, the Department of Defense mail center must present this mail to the U.S. Postal Service on the date indicated by the meter, because this is a legal postmark per the U.S. Uniform Commercial Code.
4-4 Interoffice Mail
At installations of the different services, interoffice mail is referred to by various terms: BITC (Air Force bases), Holy Joe (Army bases), interoffice (most Navy bases), and guard mail (Marine Corps bases and some Navy bases). This correspondence stays within the military mail system, so the U.S. Postal Service doesn't handle it and no postage is applied.
Internal activities and organizations on the Department of Defense installation use interoffice mail service when sending unclassified correspondence to addresses located within the same Department of Defense installation. The Department of Defense mail center serves as the established central distribution point for incoming/outgoing interoffice mail.
The Department of Defense mail center distributes interoffice mail to the various internal offices on an installation at varying times and with varying frequencies depending on local policy. This mail might be distributed only once a day (such as when a unit picks up its mail at the Department of Defense mail center), or it might be delivered twice a day (such as by a BITC truck).
4-5 Overnight Services
4-5.1 USPS Express Mail
Overnight services to APOs/FPOs, international addresses, and addresses not serviced through the General Services Administration (GSA) annual contract are sent by USPS Express Mail.
4-5.2 General Services Administration (GSA) Annual Contract
The GSA contracts on an annual basis for overnight services for Federal government agencies, including the Department of Defense . For overnight services within the United States, most military installations utilize the GSA overnight service contractor. The current contractor charges a minimum-weight single piece rate significantly less than any rate commercially available. The distribution point is the Traffic Management Office (TMO) at every installation, and the military recommends that a letter justifying the service accompany the correspondence. Also, since the Department of Defense has deemed the current overnight service contractor to be a secure process for the transmission of registered items, there has been an increase in the use of this overnight service contractor's product for registered items on military installations.
4-6 Accountable Mail
4-6.1 Definition
Accountable mail consists of Express Mail, Registered Mail, certified mail, numbered insured mail, and return receipt for merchandise. Positive photo identification and signature is required before delivery.
4-6.2 Official Mail
The U.S. Postal Service is to deliver all official accountable mail only to an authorized Department of Defense agent. If there are consistently more than two pieces a day (even though some days might have no pieces or only one or two pieces), the USPS clerk records delivery using PS Form 3883, Firm Delivery Book, rather than PS Form 3849, Delivery Notice/Reminder/Receipt. The Department of Defense agent delivers the article at the command/activity to an individual authorized by the commanding officer to receive and/or open official accountable mail. The Department of Defense mail center maintains a chain of receipts and keeps records on file for the required period of time as noted in the Department of Defense Official Mail Manual. The Department of Defense agent may use PS Form 3883 for keeping records on file.
4-6.3 Personal Mail
All personal accountable mail is delivered by the U.S. Postal Service directly to the addressee, except when written authorization by the addressee has been granted to deliver the article to another individual. Unit mail clerks/orderlies are not authorized to sign for personal accountable mail that is not their own. In training units or on secure portions of installations, USPS delivery personnel use PS Form 3849 to notify an individual in a timely manner that personal accountable mail is available. The individual then must pick up the article directly from the local U.S. post office.
4-6.4 Registered Mail
When Department of Defense personnel collect registered or secret articles for mailing on an installation, the appropriate Department of Defense rules will be followed and the security of the mail will be accounted for at all times. Many installations use red bags to highlight these articles. These articles are the responsibility of the Department of Defense and are subject to Department of Defense rules and procedures until accepted by an authorized USPS agent.
4-7 Forwarding Mail
4-7.1 General
Sometimes a U.S. post office on a military installation receives mail without a complete or legible address. Rather than immediately returning this mail to the sender, the U.S. Postal Service usually delivers it to the Department of Defense mail center, which then delivers any mail requiring directory service to the installation's command mailrooms. (Each individual command on base will have its own mailroom and staff.) The command mailroom is also responsible for providing a forwarding address if the individual is no longer at the address on the mailpiece. Some Department of Defense installations have attempted to centralize these services in the Department of Defense mail center. If so, the Department of Defense mail center would provide directory service for mail that is addressed to individuals in transit, is illegible, or has an incomplete address.
Each installation has a base locator office that maintains a database containing the unit and assigned location of all assigned personnel, including personnel on temporary duty (TDY) and recent reassignments. This service is usually provided by a contractor, and it may be located with other contract mail services such as mail forwarding and unaccompanied housing (barracks) mail service.
4-7.2 Air Force Bases
Most Air Force bases have a postal service center with a locator function to redirect mail for newly arrived personnel or single personnel residing in a dormitory. Residents of base housing typically file change of address cards directly with the local U.S. post office for mail forwarding during their military reassignments.
4-7.3 Naval Bases
In an effort to reduce costs, the Navy has established consolidated mail facilities serving multiple Department of Defense installations and government offices. These facilities consolidate outgoing mail to take advantage of lowest rates by using mechanized and automated equipment to generate presort mail. The Navy has centralized facilities in several cities and plans to establish such facilities in other cities as well.
a. Existing sites:
(1) New Orleans, LA.
(2) Norfolk, VA.
(3) Pearl Harbor, HI.
(4) Pensacola, FL.
(5) San Diego, CA.
(6) Washington, DC.
b. Planned sites:
(1) Bremerton, WA.
(2) Charleston, SC.
(3) Jacksonville, FL.
Most Navy consolidated mail facilities do not act as a central base locator for the installation. Mail is delivered to the addressed command, and the command is responsible for performing proper directory service if the addressee is no longer at that address. Navy consolidated mail facilities generally do not perform directory service on mail.
Naval stations are different from other Department of Defense installations in that they receive fleet post office (FPO) mail for the ships assigned to that particular base. These ships can be either in port, at sea, or laid up for repairs. This mail is received from the appropriate mail processing center already containerized by ship. Letters are contained in half trays, flats are contained in sealed flat tubs, and parcels are contained in #1 sacks. This mail is delivered by the military mail center to authorized representatives of each ship in port, or is held for a ship's return to port. Daily communication is made with each processing center to ensure proper routing of mail for ships traveling between naval stations. Local postmasters/station managers should be aware of this mail's critical nature and the need to coordinate closely for its prompt transfer.
4-8 Official Mail Metering
4-8.1 General
Official mail is mail matter that contains correspondence pertaining to the official function of the installation. By Department of Defense regulations, the Department of Defense mail center is to control and meter official mail and serves as the central distribution point for all outgoing official mail. The Department of Defense mail center collects, reviews, and processes official mail, applies postage to it (either with stamps or an official postage meter), and then dispatches it to the U.S. Postal Service. Note: the Department of Defense mail center is not authorized to deposit official mail in USPS mail collection boxes.
The Department of Defense does not consider mail to be "official" until it has been postmarked by an official postage meter, or until it has had an appropriate quantity of postage stamps affixed to it, and then placed under the control of the U.S. Postal Service or its representatives. Until it is "official," it is not subject to USPS postal laws and regulations in terms of handling, security, or search and seizure considerations. Further, official mail ceases to be categorized as "mail" as soon as the U.S. Postal Service properly delivers it to the addressee or an authorized agent - at that point, it becomes correspondence or matter, and is no longer subject to USPS postal laws or regulations. At that point, it comes under the jurisdiction of the Department of Defense and is subject to the provisions of the Department of Defense Official Mail Manual.
The Department of Defense is in the process of implementing "Postage on Line," particularly for smaller installations that currently use postage stamps. This marketing initiative will allow low-volume stamp users to print the equivalent of meter strips on their own personal computer. For more information, contact your district Business Center. Postmasters/station managers should communicate with their military counterparts to determine their participation, and should be prepared to assist in the implementation of this program.
4-8.2 Air Force Centralized Mail Metering
At an Air Force base, the official mail manager supervises the Base Information Transfer System (BITS), which is the collection point for all outgoing official mail. BITS collects, reviews, and processes official mail, applies postage to it, and then dispatches it to the U.S. Postal Service. BITS can dispatch mail either by delivering it to the nearest U.S. post office, or having it picked up by the U.S. Postal Service at regularly scheduled times.
4-8.3 Naval Centralized Mail Metering
Navy consolidated mail facilities act as a collection point for all outgoing official mail. They collect outgoing official mail from all participating Department of Defense installations in the geographic area, review and process the mail, apply postage to it, and dispatch it to the U.S. Postal Service. These units are self-supporting, being run on the funds they save through presorting the mail and taking advantage of rates that are lower than the single piece rate. The military can dispatch mail either by delivering it to the nearest U.S. post office, or having it picked up by the U.S. Postal Service at regularly scheduled times.
4-9 Diagramming Mail Flows at the Department of Defense Installation
Each U.S. Postal Service manager, in conjunction with the appropriate military mail manager, should diagram the mail flows that are currently present at the military installation being served. This will provide the postal manager with specific information on military mail flows on the Department of Defense installation. It also will lead to improved communication between the USPS and the Department of Defense managers and to improved, efficient mail service.

5 Street Addressing
5-1 Introduction
Proper addressing is the key to ensuring that mail is processed in the most timely and efficient manner. Proper addressing makes possible the use of automated equipment that speeds up service, minimizes errors, and promotes good business practices. Both the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense installations benefit through the use of proper addressing. By working together, we can help ensure that all mailings have proper street addresses, that these addresses are unique and capable of being handled on automation equipment, and that all of our customers are aware of how mailings should be addressed.
Another feature of proper street addressing is that it provides a unique locator address for emergency services, identifying specific locations for providing directions, etc. The recent emphasis on "911 addressing" (i.e., having a unique address for each physical location) in the civilian community is just as critical on Department of Defense installations, because the need for definitive landmarks and points for directions exists there as well. By working together to provide unique street addressing for all buildings and facilities, these critical areas can be addressed and resolved.
The use of building numbers as address locators should be discouraged. Department of Defense generally assigns building numbers in numerical order in the order of construction of the individual buildings. Consequently, buildings that are close together might have numbers that vary greatly. When building numbers are used for announcements, directions, telephone directories, and other purposes, there is an increased reliance on memory and post familiarization. This makes new members of the community, including new postal employees, at a disadvantage and requires an intense period of memorization before familiarity is gained. This is detrimental to the efficient use of employees for delivery purposes, including package, Express Mail, and collection services. The most prominent number displayed on any building should be the address, rather than the building number.
5-2 USPS Official Publications
This handbook is a supplement to the Postal Service's Publication 28, Postal Addressing Standards. Publication 28 and the Domestic Mail Manual (DMM) contain the official USPS addressing standards and must be followed in all cases. Always use the most current editions of these documents, which are accessible on the corporate intranet at click on Information, then Policies and Procedures, then either Publications or Manuals, and then scroll to the desired document. All USPS facility managers are responsible for ensuring that current copies of these documents are available at all times. USPS copies of Publication 28 and the DMM can be obtained by submitting a request through the normal USPS supply requisition process.
Because of the complexity of addressing in different areas of the country, this handbook is not intended to be inclusive. It will provide only the basics. You might need to seek the assistance of local district personnel to resolve various situations such as unique ZIP Codes, shared ZIP Codes, grid addressing, alternate addressing, phantom or auxiliary route assignments, etc.
Department of Defense installations can obtain a free copy of Publication 28 and an order form for the DMM by calling 1-800-238-3150. These publications are also available through the Internet Web site at www.usps.com. All USPS managers of facilities serving military installations should make sure that the commanding officer and his/her staff have or know how to obtain current copies of Publication 28 and the DMM.
5-3 USPS District Support
The following USPS district staff is available to assist USPS managers and Department of Defense commands with information on addressing:
a. The manager of Address Management Systems is responsible for providing all necessary assistance in addressing for a district. This manager reports to the district manager of Operations Programs Support and is responsible for all address coding rules and policies issued by USPS Headquarters Address Management.
b. The Address Management Systems specialist is responsible for providing all necessary assistance for specific 3-digit or 5-digit ZIP Codes within a district. This person reports to the manager of Address Management Systems.
5-4 Proper Addressing
The Postal Service defines a complete address as one that has all the address elements necessary to allow an exact match with the current Postal Service ZIP+4 File and the City State File to obtain the finest level of ZIP+4 and delivery point codes for the delivery address.
The delivery address line and the last line of address on a mailpiece should be complete, standardized, and validated with the ZIP+4 File (for delivery address line) and the City State File (last line). See the example in Exhibit 5-4.
The delivery address line on a mailpiece should allow space for a minimum of 30 characters. To be compatible with the USPS National ZIP+4 database, the optimum is 64 characters.
A standardized address is one that is fully spelled out, or that is abbreviated by using the Postal Service standard abbreviations as shown in Publication 28 or in the current Postal Service ZIP+4 file.
The address block on a mailpiece specifies the location to which the mailpiece is to be delivered by either the U.S. Postal Service or the Department of Defense . All mail must bear address information that contains at least the following elements in this order from the top line:
1. Intended recipient's name or other identification.
2. Street and number. (Include apartment, suite or unit number.)
3. City and state. (The city is any acceptable mailing name shown for the 5-digit ZIP Code listed in the USPS city-state file serving the intended recipient. Currently not all Department of Defense installation names are listed as acceptable city mailing name in the city-state file. Local Address Management System offices need to be consulted to add the installation name if not currently acceptable.)
4. ZIP Code (5 digit or ZIP+4) where required. (This appears on the same line as the city and state.)


Exhibit 5-4: Proper Addressing Format
GENERAL HERMAN H HALFTRACK
(Attention Line)
HEADQUARTERS INSTALLATION GP
(Recipient Line)
123 TANK DR RM 327
(Delivery Address Line)
CAMP SWAMPY VA 20102-0123
(Last Line)

5-5 Addressing Within the United States
Mail addressed to military personnel within the United States must show the name of the military installation, the state, and the correct ZIP Code or ZIP+4 code. The following conditions also apply:
a. Mail addressed to Army personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), and organization.
b. Mail addressed to Air Force personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), organization, and box number (if served by a PSC).
c. Mail addressed to Navy and Marine Corps personnel must show full name (including first name and middle name or initial), rank or rating, and organization.
d. Mail sent to a dependant of military personnel for delivery through the sponsor's military unit must be addressed in care of the sponsor. However, if mail for a dependent is sent for delivery at the sponsor's military quarters, it need not be addressed in care of the sponsor.
Place secondary address unit designators at the end of the delivery address line. Use the proper abbreviation for apartment (APT), suite (STE), unit (UNIT), floor (FL), room (RM), department (DEPT), etc. Do not use the pound sign (#) if the correct designation is known.
The APO/FPO address format is used ONLY for overseas military address. It is not authorized for domestic military addressing. See the following section.
United States Postal Service Headquarters Address Management is to be notified by the Department of Defense of all plans to assign or convert addresses. They will be responsible for providing the proper assistance at the district post office level to acquire approval of address content and format.
5-6 Military Addresses in Overseas Locations
For overseas military addresses, the last line must contain the APO or FPO designation, the appropriate two-letter "state" abbreviation (AA, AE, or AP), and the appropriate 5-digit ZIP Code or ZIP+4 (the 3-digit ZIP Code prefix for AA is 340, for AE it is 090-098, and for AP it is 962-966). The delivery address line must show the ship name, unit number, Consolidated Mail Room (CMR) number or PSC number, and box number (if assigned). The following conditions also apply:
a. Mail addressed to Army personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle name or initial), and unit number.
b. Mail addressed to Air Force personnel must show grade, full name (including first name and middle initial), and PSC or unit number.
c. Mail addressed to Navy and Marine Corps personnel must show rank or rating, full name (including first name and middle initial), and PSC number for shore-based units. Ship name must be used if applicable.
d. Mail sent to dependants residing in overseas areas must be addressed in care of the sponsor.
5-7 Geographic Address
Mail showing a foreign city and country in addition to the military address is considered international mail and is subject to the postage rates and conditions for international mail. This mail will not be retained with the APO/FPO systems.
5-8 Methods of Addressing
Department of Defense installations are Federal property. Department of Defense installations not having standard street addressing should be encouraged to adopt the addressing system used by adjacent communities, cities, or counties. The installation commander should assume responsibilities for implementing an address project on Department of Defense installations. City and county planning and engineering departments in many areas may be able to provide expertise since they are involved in address assignment and street naming. They may also have computer-mapping capability.
The U.S. Postal Service is not authorized and should not accept responsibility for the assignment of addresses. However, it is appropriate and proper that the U.S. Postal Service provide assistance and guidance to the installation commander and the local community during local addressing programs. Please contact Headquarters Address Management at 1-800-331-5746. They will make the appropriate contacts within the responsible district to ensure that the installation commander and the local community have the necessary information.
However, the U.S. Postal Service is responsible for working with city, county, and state officials to ensure that the address assignments are automation-compatible. It is the policy of the U.S. Postal Service not to accept any addressing system that is not compatible with our automation efforts. Consider the following conditions:
a. The use of building names or numbers is not an acceptable addressing format.
b. An official street name and numbering approval process should be established in areas where one does not exist. When assigning or approving street names, avoid duplicate or similar-sounding names, and ensure continuity with existing streets.
c. All addressing systems should be based on a simple fixed grid or fixed block numbering system that is county based. This requires close coordination with the USPS Address Management System office to ensure accurate and complete addressing is used in a postal delivery area.
d. USPS facility managers must not approve any proposed addressing system including the use of ZIP+4 Codes until it has been reviewed and approved by the district manager of Address Management Systems.
5-9 Benefits of Standardized Address Formats
Address standardization is a positive step towards address quality and is a cost-effective operation for both the postal customer and the Postal Service.
5-9.1 Benefits to Customers
Standardized address formats offer the following benefits to customers:
a. Consistent and timely delivery of mail.
b. Ease of reference when giving directions for public use.
c. Greater reliability in receiving emergency services.
d. Reduction in misreads by postal automation equipment and postal personnel.
e. Increased potential for deliverability of mail once processed.
f. Consistency of address information stored in customer files and directories.
5-9.2 Benefits to the U.S. Postal Service
Standardized address formats offer the following benefits to the U.S. Postal Service:
a. Increased efficiency in mail processing, including greater use of automated equipment.
b. Reduction in misreads by postal automation equipment and postal personnel.
c. Reduction in mail handling by postal personnel, both USPS and Department of Defense .
d. Faster and more consistent mail delivery.
e. Reduction in processing and operating costs.

6 Overview of Automation and DPS
6-1 Introduction
Automation enables the U.S. Postal Service to offer its customers better service at lower cost. Because the U.S. Postal Service is realizing sufficient volume of barcoded mail, it can now apply automation to delivery operations. Delivery Point Sequencing (DPS) is the culmination of this automation effort. Using automated machinery, DPS places a high percentage of letter mail in delivery point sequence with great accuracy. This eliminates the need for delivery personnel to hand-case high volumes of letters, and it reduces missorts and other subsequent letter-handling errors.
More than any other change ever implemented in the U.S. Postal Service, DPS requires the coordination and cooperation of every functional operation. DPS affects every facet of mail processing and delivery and also involves the resources of many administrative operations. Operational groups such as Processing and Distribution, In-Plant Support, Operations Programs Support, and Distribution Networks all have critical roles in DPS. Unions and administrative support groups such as Human Resources, Information Systems, and Finance also have integral roles in supporting DPS.
The goal of Processing and Distribution is to establish effective communications among the various groups and successfully implement DPS. The U.S. Postal Service expects this goal to be achieved through teamwork, training, and employee involvement. The experiences of delivery units that have implemented DPS thus far have proven that teamwork is vital to a successful implementation. A core group of people, augmented by functional experts as necessary, needs to be established to initiate DPS.
The successful implementation of DPS requires the resources of many functional areas. DPS implementation teams have proven effective in pulling these resources together. If teams are not already in place, formation of these teams should be requested. These teams are vital to successful DPS implementation.
6-2 Automation and DPS Implementation Teams
It is important that the district establish a coordinating body or team above the local teams. This district-level team is to be concerned with DPS implementation issues that affect more than one delivery unit. This team is to be a multi-functional group that coordinates the successful implementation of DPS and all letter automation, ensures district policies are followed, interfaces with the union, and resolves local problems between functional areas. This team could be based upon the performance cluster, district, or plant team. The senior management in the district, the district manager, and the lead plant manager decide on this team's composition. The team should include the positions listed in the following sections.
6-2.1 Manager of Operations Program Support (MOPS)
The manager of Operations Program Support and the MOPS office provides support to delivery and customer services operations. This manager ensures that delivery concerns and problems are voiced and addressed. This office is also responsible for implementing any required changes in the delivery and customer service operations.
6-2.2 Manager of In-Plant Support (MIPS)
If the team is at the performance cluster or district level, there are several managers of In-Plant Support (MIPS). One or more of these managers could serve on the team. This individual provides support for Processing and Distribution operations and ensures that plant concerns and problems are brought forth. This manager is the key person in achieving DPS mail volume targets and for supporting sort plan development and in-plant quality efforts.
6-2.3 Manager of Address Management Systems
The accuracy and maintenance of sort plans is the cornerstone of an effective DPS process. Sort plans are dependent on the quality of the address management database for accuracy. The Address Management Systems (AMS) office thus plays a key role in any effective DPS program. The manager of AMS is the key person to ensure that all address management concerns are brought forth. They work with their staffs to implement required changes in the database and to perform ongoing audits and maintenance of the database.
6-2.4 Other Key Personnel
The district office should also consider other key personnel for the DPS initiation process. Potential members include personnel from the following organizations:
a. Logistics and Transportation.
b. Maintenance.
c. Quality Improvement.
d. Labor Relations.
e. Human Resources.
6-2.5 The Local Team
The makeup of the local team follows the same pattern as the performance cluster, district, or plant team in that it should contain those people who have the ability to make decisions during the planning process at the local level and effect change during DPS implementation. The local team has the following responsibilities:
a. Coordinate the successful implementation of DPS at the delivery unit level.
b. Work with other functional areas (especially Processing and Distribution) and serve as liaison between functional areas.
c. Ensure all DPS requirements (work methods, target percentages, case configuration, etc.) are met.
d. Handle day-to-day operational issues.
e. Ensure that savings and service objectives are attained.
With these responsibilities in mind, the local DPS implementation team should include the individuals noted in the following sections.
6-2.5.1 Manager of Distribution Operations
The manager of distribution operations may not be able to attend every meeting but must be aware of the plant's performance in supporting DPS units.
6-2.5.2 Supervisor of Distribution Operations (Tours 1 and 2)
The Tour 1 individual should be the supervisor responsible for the DPS operation in the plant. His or her attendance at the local meetings allows face-to-face discussion with the DPS delivery manager for timely and accurate exchange of information. This person also provides delivery units with the quickest way to effect change in mail plants. In addition, because the delivery operation occurs on Tour 2, the Tour 2 automation supervisor should also be included. Delivery management personnel will then have a person at the plant they can talk to directly if a problem occurs. This person should work with the Tour 1 supervisor to resolve problems.
6-2.5.3 Manager of Post Office Operations
The manager of Post Office Operations (MPOO) has line authority over and oversees post offices on the level of EAS-24 or below and is a key resource in initiating DPS. Because the MPOO is directly responsible to support overall performance of all but the largest post offices, he or she must be an integral part of the entire DPS implementation process. The MPOO is invaluable in identifying problems that have surfaced in early DPS sites and in recommending courses of action that have proven successful in addressing and resolving those problems. The MPOO may not be available for every local meeting, but his or her direct participation and support is extremely valuable at the start of the process and in overcoming problems.
6-2.5.4 Postmaster, Station Branch Manager, and First-Line Delivery Supervisor
These delivery managers are in the best position to gauge the progress of the DPS process and make it successful. These individuals can observe the direct impact of DPS on their units and can monitor the process to help provide a quality product. Their observations can clarify and quantify the successful elements of the process and also identify those areas that require improvement and/or change. Delivery managers, along with plant personnel (especially from Tour 1), are the vital cogs in a successful DPS process. When a delivery unit is receiving correctly sorted DPS mail, the delivery manager for that unit is the key to making the changes at the delivery unit that result in reduced costs and improved service.
6-2.5.5 Sort Plan Developer
The sort plan developer, who usually is part of In-Plant Support, is the key to ensuring that an accurate sort plan is developed and maintained in the delivery unit. Since sort plans may require changes on a daily basis through Station Input, coordination between the sort plan developer and the DPS unit is vital.
6-2.5.6 Manager of Transportation and Networks
The time and presentation of DPS and residual (non-DPS) mail is critical to the success of the DPS process. The manager of Transportation and Networks should be involved at the earliest planning stages. This manager's role is to ensure that transportation meets the needs of the delivery unit and maximizes the window for processing by ensuring timely and adequate mailflows through the DPS processing. Experience has shown that proper and effective transportation schedules are often a key aspect in a successful DPS unit.
6-2.5.7 Other Resources
Experience demonstrates that the effective implementation of DPS requires the cooperation of many functional areas. It is strongly recommended that this team use resources from other functional areas as necessary. This might involve utilizing experienced supervisors from other units, rural QWL-EI teams, and area or national subject matter experts to resolve specific problems.
6-2.6 Customer Services Managers
A third team has also proven valuable in early DPS sites. This informal group is comprised of customer services DPS managers. They develop a network of DPS managers to share successes, problems, and solutions and to serve as mentors for managers about to enter the DPS process. For example, a unit manager may become a member of this group 3 months prior to DPS initiation and then leave 3 months after DPS implementation. Regular monthly meetings are recommended.
6-3 Automation and DPS Implementation Planning
When delivery managers plan the DPS initiation process, they need to give significant thought not only to the final objectives, but also to the steps required to get to those objectives. While the final goals are to reduce costs and improve service, achieving these goals involve factors such as the following:
a. Reaching DPS volume levels.
b. Achieving and maintaining quality thresholds.
c. Reducing office casing and strapping-out time.
d. Ensuring that any increases in city carrier street time are justified.
e. Inspecting routes to establish automation impacts.
f. Restructuring routes at both interim adjustment and final target levels.
These tasks can be accomplished only with the full cooperation of all employees - both management and craft.
The following sections discuss how to prepare for DPS implementation and manage the necessary tasks.
6-3.1 Team Plan
The first thing delivery managers need to consider in preparing for DPS is all the elements that need to be accomplished, when they need to be accomplished, and by whom. The easiest way to succeed is through the team approach outlined in 6-2. For a team to operate, it needs a good plan.
Two examples of an overall outline for a good plan appear in the DPS Implementation Guide, which was developed for successful DPS implementation. This handbook can be acquired from the area or district DPS coordinator. These plans include the items that the team needs to consider. Delivery managers should use a comprehensive plan to implement DPS.
6-3.2 Final DPS Target Percentage
Prior to selecting the DPS implementation process, delivery managers should determine their DPS target percentage. The target percentage is mutually determined by the plant and the delivery unit and should be attained within 90 days of DPS implementation at the delivery unit. The minimum target percentage should be 40 percent. When met, this target percentage triggers route adjustments. There are a number of factors to be considered in establishing this target, as explained in the following sections.
6-3.2.1 Present Letter Volumes
Delivery managers need to analyze their present letter volumes. Mail processing is an excellent resource in this analysis. Two-pass volume (sector segment) can serve as a starting point for expected levels of DPS.
6-3.2.2 Carrier Route Presort
Carrier route presort letter volumes offer an excellent opportunity to increase DPS volumes where it is cost effective. A memo detailing the standard operating procedures appears at the end of module 3 in the DPS Implementation Guide. Delivery managers should meet with processing and distribution to determine how presort letter volumes will be captured and put into DPS.
6-3.2.3 Remote Barcoding System (RBCS)
A unit that is serviced by a remote barcoding system (RBCS) site should raise its level of DPS volume. As with carrier route presort, delivery managers should meet with processing and distribution to determine the impact that RBCS might have on the unit's DPS percentage.
6-3.3 Sort Plan Maintenance
Once accurate sort plan data has been ensured, maintaining it in a current and accurate format is critical to the long-range success of DPS. Delivery managers should accomplish this by ensuring that carriers properly use and complete the Edit Book and PS Form 1621, Delivery Management Report, as outlined in Handbook M-39, Management of Delivery Services, section 128.21. Also, every day delivery managers should use Station Input, which is a tool that enables delivery managers to modify the DPS sort program. (See 6-5.)
6-4 Sort Program System (SPS)
The sort program system (SPS), a key tool in the DPS environment, is used to develop sort programs. Sort programs are used on automated equipment to put mail in delivery sequence order.
A sort program developer (who is usually a member of the In-Plant Support staff) uses SPS to generate the DPS sort program, which is then transferred to letter a mail processing barcode sorter (MPBCS) or a delivery barcode sorter (DBCS).
Successful implementation of DPS requires that the sort program be 100 percent accurate. The Address Management Systems (AMS), the sort program developer, and the delivery unit must communicate efficiently to ensure the accuracy of the sort program.
The AMS staff can assist delivery managers in the process of assessing the accuracy of the address file data. Delivery managers must ensure that the address file data is correct before generating DPS sort plans.
Communication and cooperation between the delivery manager and the sort program developer is a key to success with DPS. Before the sort program developer creates the actual sort program, he or she should consult with the delivery manager to determine holdout needs. Prior to starting DPS, it is critical that the delivery unit manager and the sort plan developer meet to establish the following:
a. A password for the delivery unit manager to access Station Input.
b. A schedule for when to conduct Station Input.
c. A time of day when sort plans are to be updated.
d. What 5-digit zones the delivery unit manager will have access to during Station Input.
6-5 Station Input
6-5.1 Overview
Station Input is a tool that enables delivery managers to modify the DPS sort program. Using Station Input will help manage the quality of the DPS sortation and the efficiency of the unit's delivery operation.
Appendix E of the DPS Implementation Guide explains the procedures for using Station Input and making changes to the DPS sort program.
6-5.2 Using Station Input to Eliminate Sortation Errors
Station Input can be a valuable tool for quickly attaining the 98 percent quality threshold required by our Memorandum of Understanding with the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC). Using Station Input, delivery managers can remove from the DPS sort program addresses that present sequencing problems. The mail for those addresses can be separated from the DPS letter mail and directed to the carrier's case for manual handling.
Problem addresses can be identified using CLASS reports, the DPS validation procedure, the Sequence of Segments report, or through the quality tests conducted after the unit begins to receive DPS mail. Further information on these reports and procedures can be obtained from the manager of Address Management Systems (AMS).
Keep in mind that the decision to take an address out of the DPS Station Input will remove mail from the DPS mailstream. Therefore, excessive use of Station Input to remove addresses from the DPS mailstream will lower the ability to meet the DPS target percentage.
To help DPS perform most efficiently, delivery managers should try to identify and correct problems that cause addresses to have sequencing difficulties. Solutions can range from changing sector segments or addresses to installing centralized delivery.
6-5.3 Using Station Input for Efficiency
Station Input can also be an effective tool to make short-term "tweaks" to the DPS sort program to enhance the efficiency of the unit's delivery operation.
When using Station Input for these purposes, delivery managers should consider the cost associated with collecting Station lnput data and entering it into the system. Some units have found the cost of using Station Input outweighs the benefits derived if care is not taken to manage the process.
Delivery managers should use Station Input to modify the sort plan or divert mail from the DPS mailstream only in response to short-term changes in operational requirements and only when using it can demonstrate a tangible workhour or service benefit.
Delivery managers may also use Station Input for other short-term changes in the DPS sort plans for the unit. With Station Input, delivery managers can change the sequencing order within the sort program to accommodate temporary changes in the order of delivery on a route. Delivery managers can also use Station Input to separate from the DPS mailstream mail for addresses with caller service or business reply mail.
6-5.4 Managing Station Input
The information that delivery managers will need for Station Input comes from two sources - from the carriers, and from analyses of the units address file or DPS mailstream. Delivery managers should establish formal procedures for carriers to request changes to the sort program. The procedures should include a cutoff time for submitting requests, with the cutoff time associated with the unit's scheduled time for conducting Station Input on the computer.
The unit supervisor should evaluate any requests for sort plan changes, and, if necessary, discuss them with the carrier. Once approved, delivery managers should make the changes using Station Input according to the schedule set through the plant's in-plant support staff.
6-6 Plant Impact
6-6.1 Key Factors
Based upon communications with the delivery unit, the plant will make changes to the mail arrival profile and develop a new standard operating procedure (SOP) during the planning process. To have an efficient operation and to capture projected savings, delivery managers must ensure that a commitment between the delivery unit and the plant covers the unit's needs. Some key factors that need to be included are discussed in the following sections.
6-6.1.1 Non-DPS
The following procedures should be used with non-DPS mail:
a. Flats, first-pass rejects, and mail that cannot be automated should arrive as early as possible and on the agreed-upon transportation.
b. Trays should be labeled to facilitate distribution and volume recording.
c. Procedures should be in place to record and distribute mail efficiently and accurately.
d. All residual mail should be sorted to the carrier route level.
e. Residual mail volume on the final trip should be minimal (hot case mail only).
6-6.1.2 DPS
The following procedures should be used with DPS mail:
a. DPS mail should be run every day.
b. DPS volumes should meet the commitment levels. Experience has shown that DPS volumes may fluctuate from day to day but do not usually fluctuate from one Monday to the next Monday, from one Tuesday to the next Tuesday, etc.
c. DPS mail should come consolidated, properly labeled, and ready for street delivery.
d. Mail should be sorted as per the most recent sort plan.
e. Mail on the last trip should be minimal (hot case mail only).
f. The quality within the DPS mailstream should be 98 percent or higher (i.e., it should meet or exceed the quality threshold).
g. Marker cards should run properly.
h. Transportation should meet the needs of the delivery unit.
6-6.2 Delivery Manager's Responsibility
The delivery manager is responsible for identifying these factors and seeking solutions with processing and distribution. To accomplish these responsibilities, delivery managers need to understand what information they need to collect and in what format it should be presented. During the planning process, delivery managers should review these issues and should know exactly what data is necessary to identify and resolve problems. Delivery managers should develop a structured list so that they can train carriers to bring to their attention any problems that negatively affect the ability to capture DPS savings.
Delivery managers must establish a daily feedback mechanism with the plant to both identity and resolve problems. They should appoint two specific people for this purpose so that they can become familiar with their functional counterparts. These people should meet one another and visit the other's site early in the process to understand the concerns of each group. See end of module 2 of the DPS Implementation Guide for an example of a list of points of contact.
It is very important that delivery managers and the plant agree on key factors affecting DPS and that they do their part to achieve success in each key factor. Both the plant and delivery managers should track the progress of each key factor in achieving success.
6-6.3 Transportation
Many early DPS sites made the mistake of trying to fit the DPS process into their current transportation schedules even though those schedules did not meet the needs of the plant or the delivery unit.
During the planning process, delivery managers should thoroughly review and analyze transportation schedules to ensure that they optimize the operational requirements of both parties. They should include the transportation manager in discussions with the plant. Upon implementing DPS, they should monitor transportation schedules to ensure that they meet the unit's needs. If transportation schedules are not effective, delivery managers must do the following:
a. Document problems and their impact on the unit.
b. Contact the plant to discuss these problems.
c. Analyze problems and discuss solutions.
d. Redefine requirements and make adjustments.
e. Continue to monitor transportation schedules to ensure their effectiveness.
6-7 Management and Union Involvement
6-7.1 Overview
As it is with the operational groups, teamwork is also necessary for the carriers and union officials in a delivery unit. The 1992 arbitration award outlined in the USPS-NALC Joint Training Guide, "Building Our Future by Working Together," based on the September 1992 Memorandums of Understanding (MOU), contains guidelines and parameters for working with the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) and the carriers. Every manager must become familiar with this document, with the 80 questions and answers jointly published related to the MOUs, and the current editions of Handbook M-39, Management of Delivery Services, and Handbook M-41, City Delivery Carriers Duties and Responsibilities. These documents contain guidance on elements such as:
a. Unilateral or X-Route implementation process.
b. Work methods.
c. Target percentages.
d. Casing configurations.
e. Adjustment procedures.
In addition, delivery managers must become familiar with the March 10, 1994, DPS implementation strategies and, if they have rural routes, with the DPS Implementation Procedures for Rural Routes. This handbook can be acquired from the area or district DPS coordinator. (Please note that, although DPS implementation is similar for rural routes and city carrier routes, there are important differences.)
Prior to DPS implementation, the manager of Operations Programs Support (or designee) should conduct for the delivery managers involved a briefing session on the MOUs, strategies, implementation guidelines, and the plant/delivery unit relationship and how they affect the decisions that delivery unit managers must make.
Note: The guidelines in the DPS Implementation Guide require the input of the local union but do not abdicate management's rights or responsibilities for the efficient implementation of DPS and for managing DPS operations. Decisions, whether made unilaterally or jointly in conjunction with the local parties as prescribed by the MOUs, should be made based on service, efficiency, and the needs of the delivery unit.
6-7.2 Employee Communication and Training
It is important for delivery managers to inform carriers of changes that will result from DPS before implementation. Most of these impacts are contained in the Delivery Point Sequencing Joint Training for city letter carriers that was developed by the NALC and the U.S. Postal Service. (This training should be given to every city letter carrier prior to DPS implementation, and it is mandatory before taking DPS mail directly to the street without casing.) Changes such as those in schedules, sort plans, work methods, and procedures for taking mail directly to the street should be discussed before DPS is implemented. Delivery managers should also keep carriers informed of DPS-related changes during and after the implementation when the changes will affect their daily operations.
6-7.3 Communication Link
Delivery managers must establish and maintain a feedback mechanism with the plant and other support groups. The daily flow of information throughout the implementation process is critical to the success of DPS. Every functional group must be aware of how this communication link works and use it. A point of-contact for each group should be designated on a feedback list. The list of contacts should specify whom to contact to plan, coordinate, and resolve problems.

7 Growth Management
7-1 Overview and Introduction
7-1.1 Overview
The U.S. Postal Service must manage growth to control costs. The 1995 Cost of Delivery Study shows a significant difference in annual cost between door, curb, and centralized delivery, as shown in Exhibit 7-1.1: The costs shown are per delivery, and include vehicle, personnel, and equipment costs.
Exhibit 7-1.1: Annual Delivery Cost
Door
$243
Curb
$154
Centralized (NDCBU)
$106

When delivery growth occurs, local management is responsible for achieving the lowest possible cost commensurate with providing prompt, efficient service.
This chapter provides material extracted from Central Delivery Guidelines, which the Office of Delivery produces and provides to districts and to offices having 10 or more city routes. It provides information on managing delivery growth and on centralized delivery. (The heading numbering that appears in the rest of this handbook has been added to the extracted material.)
Many Department of Defense installations provide neighborhood delivery and collection box units (NDCBUs) and other centralized delivery equipment for family housing areas, dormitories, and barracks. Due to turnover in military personnel, the installation might not have an individual who has knowledge about maintenance procedures for centralized delivery equipment. The USPS postmaster/station manager should provide this information to military representatives for their use in maintaining their equipment and ensuring that they meet postal standards.
For further information on managing delivery growth and on centralized delivery, or to acquire a copy of the Central Delivery Guidelines, contact your district Operations Programs Support manager. The district office has a staff of delivery professionals to help answer questions, resolve problems, and act as a resource for each post office in the district. Do not hesitate to involve them in improving operations in your office.
7-1.2 Introduction
A part of Growth Management includes how the Postal Service provides and offers delivery service to new residences and businesses. To "manage" growth means to take a proactive stance. We can influence the choices made by customers concerning available delivery options.
Why do we care what type of delivery a new block, street, neighborhood or office complex chooses? What impact do new deliveries have on delivery operations?
The Postal Service, just like any other business, must look at ways to operate more efficiently, while keeping costs at a minimum. Many other companies have entered the delivery field in the last few years with overnight mail, and parcel post. We find ourselves in a competitive marketplace, and must devise new methods for moving the mail more efficiently.
Everyone benefits, the customer is given a locked, convenient mail receptacle, and the carrier can deliver mail faster on the street, is not exposed to many safety hazards, and does not have to carry pounds of mail on his or her back.
Each year new delivery addresses are added to city and rural routes across the nation. The most obvious major impact on the Postal Service is the cost of providing delivery to the new addresses.
Average annual cost per delivery has been developed for each mode. The latest estimates of those costs are:
* Door Delivery: $243 per delivery per year.
* Curbside Delivery: $154 per delivery per year.
* Cluster Box: $106 per delivery per year.
* Other Central: $110 per delivery per year.
Clearly, the cost difference between curbline and centralized delivery is significant.
There is a need to expand upon the various centralized delivery concepts to ensure that most new deliveries are serviced through a minimum number of delivery points. We need to continue to emphasize centralized delivery for all new deliveries if we expect central delivery to become the dominant mode of delivery and for the Postal Service to achieve significant cost avoidance.
The objectives for centralized delivery are:
* To implement centralized delivery in appropriate new communities, new developments, and new extensions of delivery, whether served by city, rural or highway contract delivery.
* In existing delivery areas, convert to centralized delivery wherever customers agree and it is cost beneficial to the Postal Service.
Centralized delivery must be managed very carefully during the short-term in order to protect the significant cost avoidance opportunities it presents.
For safety reasons, and uniformity of operating procedures, most policies are set by Headquarters. It would be very confusing to the customer to obtain different answers to the same questions, depending on where they live. If every manager had their own "policy," chaos would reign.
Cluster Box Unit Specifications


Type I
For high mail volume areas - 13 customer compartments, one parcel compartment and one large outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 4 3/4" high and 15" deep. The parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 7/8" high and 15" deep.
Type II
12 customer compartments, one parcel compartment and one standard outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 3" high and 15" deep. Parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 7/8" high and 15" deep.
Type III
16 customer compartments, one standard and one large parcel compartment and one standard outgoing mail slot. Customer compartments are 12" wide, 3" high and 15" deep. Large parcel compartment is 12" wide, 13 3/8" high and 15" deep. The standard parcel compartment is 12" wide, 9 718" high and 15" deep.


7-2 Postal Service Policies
7-2.1 General
The policy for establishing or extending delivery service is found in Section 641 and 651 of the Postal Operations Manual and the Deposit, Collection & Delivery Module of the Domestic Mail Manual. Included in this section is an easy to use matrix that defines delivery areas and the mode of service that can be provided.
7-2.1.1 Delivery Options
The delivery options now offered by the Postal Service for mail delivery are:
a. Residential (see Note below):
1. Centralized.
2. Curbside.
3. Sidewalk (must meet specific guidelines).
b. Business:
1. Centralized.
2. Curbside.
3. Door (must meet specific guidelines).
c. Apartments - centralized only.
Note: The Postal Service no longer offers door delivery as a new delivery option in residential areas. Door delivery is still available in limited situations such as "fill in" deliveries or in hardship cases.
Inconsistency in enforcing the policy and explaining these options causes many problems, and adds to the confusion experienced by builders and developers who frequently work in different parts of the country. For these reasons, you must ensure that your customers are advised of our policy and all of their options for delivery. When centralized delivery is selected, a Mode of Delivery Fact Sheet, or similar document must be completed, signed by the customer(s) and retained in the delivery unit. This serves as our documentation that the customer accepts the mode of delivery provided.
7-2.1.2 Agreements
An agreement, which may include some form of legal entitlement to the property where the central delivery equipment is located, should be signed by a Postal Service manager and the owner or developer of the new development. This document must include certification that the customer has been advised of all options for delivery. (Use the Mode of Delivery Fact Sheet or similar document.)
When we are successful in implementing or converting to centralized delivery, the original signed agreements, petitions, or plat maps should be maintained for at least five years, beyond the completion of the development, in office files.
7-2.1.3 Providing Equipment
Current Postal Service policy provides that we may purchase, install and maintain centralized delivery equipment on city, rural, and highway contract routes for residential, business deliveries, and deliveries on military installations. The Postal Service does not provide equipment for new deliveries to apartments, hotels or motels, or colleges and universities.
Refer to the Delivery Policy Matrix in this section to determine which areas have options for delivery and whether the USPS provides centralized delivery equipment in those areas. While we have the option of providing delivery equipment in those areas listed on the chart, our primary purpose is not to provide the equipment but to promote the concept of centralized delivery.
The approved types of equipment are CBU's/NDCBU's, post office boxes, and curbside mail receptacles where appropriate. Parcel lockers should also be used where needed. The Postal Service does not purchase apartment type receptacles. If existing equipment, originally installed by the USPS requires repairs, we can purchase replacement parts as necessary. If the mail receptacles are outdated and will not accommodate daily mail volume, then approved types of delivery equipment may be installed if the customer will not replace older apartment receptacles.
It would be to our advantage to obtain control of the sites where our central delivery equipment is located. It is strongly advised to obtain some form of legal entitlement to the real estate where the boxes are located. Contact your Chief Field Counsel for assistance.
7-2.1.4 Purchasing and Deployment Policies
CBU's/NDCBU's and parcel lockers may now be purchased in lots greater than 100. Contact your Purchasing Service Center for further information.
Records and locations of central delivery equipment must be maintained by the ordering post office. Spare parts inventories should be established and controlled by the office that performs the maintenance.
When placing central delivery equipment in state or national historic districts, concurrence should be obtained as early as possible from the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) and the local District Historic Advisory Board (DHAB). We are required by Presidential Order to maintain the integrity of National Historic Districts. At times, this makes it necessary to "dress up" the equipment, or make minor changes in the location of the units.
7-2.1.5 Parcel Lockers
As a practical matter, the U.S. Postal Service should procure and install parcel lockers in appropriate areas where there is sufficient operational or customer justification. These areas include:
* Postal Retail Locations
* Business Deliveries
* Residential Deliveries
Innovative uses for parcel lockers should be considered. Generally, the normal parcel volume must justify equipment purchase and installation. Local postal managers are responsible for determining the need for parcel locker equipment.
7-2.2 Miscellaneous Policies and Procedures
7-2.2.1 Maintenance
Each post office must establish and maintain an effective maintenance pro- gram to reduce costs and frequency of replacing equipment.
While the Postal Service may assume the responsibility for installation and maintenance of central delivery equipment, it normally will not be responsible for keeping approaches to units clear of obstructions. If there is a residents association that is responsible for maintenance activities within the development, it should also maintain the mailboxes.
Every effort should be made to have residents accept responsibility for maintaining the equipment to the extent practicable. If however, there is no central organization available, the Postal Service must assume the responsibility for maintenance, repair, grounds keeping, snow removal, etc. Each office must conduct a semi-annual inspection of all central delivery equipment owned by the Postal Service.
These procedures are outlined in the Safety section of the Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-2.2.2 Keys
Normally, all customer compartment keys for CBU's/NDCBU's, will be issued to the customer. The customer should be told that the Postal Service does not maintain spare keys and if all keys to the compartment are lost, the lock will have to be changed at their expense (see page 3-5 of the Central Delivery Guidelines for specific instructions).
In installations where post office box equipment is used, USPS must maintain keys and is responsible for replacing lost keys. Customers are not required to leave a deposit for keys.
7-2.2.3 Locks
Locks are normally changed when a customer moves. An adequate inventory of locks and cams can be obtained from the Materiel Distribution Center.
7-2.2.4 Conversions
It is the policy of the Postal Service to convert existing deliveries to centralized delivery when requested by the owners, managers, or residents of privately owned residences or the management of a building or development, if it is cost beneficial to the Postal Service. In addition, where there are problems with safety, mail security or mailbox vandalism, the Postal Service may offer centralized delivery as a means of addressing the problem.
All persons residing in single family detached houses where there is no management association and most individuals own their residence must agree in writing to any change in their delivery. Customers who do not agree with the change must be allowed to retain their mode of delivery. Local managers must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of converting less than 100% of the deliveries to be served.
When converting a delivery area, local management must ensure that all old mail receptacles are removed to avoid placing mail in unused mailboxes.
USPS may, if cost beneficial, provide the delivery equipment for any existing delivery area that wishes to convert from another mode of delivery. Service must have been extended to the total delivery area for at least one year. Managers should encourage those areas that wish to convert to purchase the delivery equipment. Our primary purpose is to promote the concept of centralized delivery and greater savings are achieved when the customers provide the delivery equipment. Refer to the section regarding conversions for more detailed information.
To maintain the Integrity of the ZIP+ 4 program, input from AMS is recommended as a part of the conversion process.
For additional and detailed information on Postal Service Delivery Policy, please see Conditions of Delivery in DMM D042 and POM Chapter 6.
7-3 Planning
This section contains basic elements of planning activities and suggested sources to contact for information about potential growth in your area. Also included in this section:
* Analysis Forms (City and Rural)
* Customer Profile Sheet
* Individual Project Checklist (2)
* Central Delivery Agreement Letter
* Example of proposed equipment locations an project map
* Sample reports of new construction
* PS Form 697, Extension of City Delivery Service
* PS Form 4003, Official Rural Route Description
7-3.1 Effective Planning for Growth
This is the subject that offers much overlooked potential for savings by all managers in the Postal Service. By knowing what is being planned in your delivery area, you are able to make many decisions that will further your ability to effectively manage your unit.
Will the growth be in city deliveries, rural route, or HCR? Do you need additional contract stations in the area? Will the present complement of distribution clerks need to be adjusted? How many more carriers will be needed to handle the new growth? Where should auxiliary routes be located? How many more carrier cases will be needed? Will a carrier annex suffice, or do we need a full service unit? How much room will be needed for carrier cases and related delivery equipment? How much employee parking? Customer parking? Lobby space?
The questions could go on, ad infinitum; but the point is this: By knowing where your growth areas are, and what is planned to be built in these areas, you are better able to answer all of the above questions, and many more.
Whatever your plan is, it should be comprehensive enough so that no important area in the overall program is left to chance, and yet flexible enough to allow for variances that will occur from time to time.
Also, a plan that will work well in one office may be somewhat different from another considering the difference in their respective areas. Failure to establish your own plan is apt to result in a fragmented program that will not take advantage of the cost-effective benefits available.
7-3.2 Where Does One Begin? Who Do l Contact?
Mail service is an integral part of any community and must be given proper consideration during the planning stages. In the past, owners, builders, and developers have assumed that postal services would be provided as a matter of course. However, advance planning for postal services is as important as the planning for any other service. Postal managers must anticipate the service needs of new communities, new housing developments, and older communities which do not have delivery service, and plan delivery systems with community growth in mind. It is almost impossible to begin too early to sell centralized delivery.
Obviously, when we come into the picture late, decisions have been made that may have to be changed; or worse, we cannot select and locate equipment that will function to everyone's advantage.
This is especially true in office buildings where available space is restricted to begin with, and an architect is reluctant to have to alter the building plans.
Space requirements should be discussed in the initial planning phase.
Residential developers need to know where central delivery points will be located so the locations can be included in the landscape plans. Site locations in single family home developments must be selected early, and such information made available to the developer so his sales people can inform prospective home buyers just where the mail receptacles will be located.
That leads to the question, "How do you find out what construction will occur before it occurs?" The best sources normally are:
1. Carriers. They see what is happening every day in their area. This includes seeing when a tract of land is sold or is being prepared for building and development. Encourage them to tell you what is happening and assure them that growth management will not result in their route becoming overburdened.
2. Street observations by manager's and supervisors. This is not limited to the local unit delivery supervisor. Station managers and other delivery managers should assist.
3. Local newspapers and magazines for articles on planned developments.
4. Obtain information from area and local planning authorities. These agencies often will send minutes of their official meetings on request.
5. Meet and communicate regularly with local builders and contractors.
6. Communicate with local utility companies such as gas/electric, water/sewer or telephone companies.
All the foregoing is useless if we don't respond promptly and positively. We cannot sit back and expect the public to keep us informed. To not keep up on matters that vitally affect our operation for years to come is to miss the boat. Those from whom we expect cooperation will appreciate it when we are ready with sound solutions to the problem of planning for good mail service.
7-3.3 Get Organized!
Effective planning includes organization. Set up some office files for each project. Growth management files should be kept current and in a location that is known to all supervisors assigned to the unit. Several supervisors may pass through an office before a project reaches completion. It is vital that each incoming supervisor be informed of the location and status of each ongoing project. These files should contain as a minimum, the following:
1. Project Checklist.
2. Made of Delivery Fact Sheet/Signed agreement.
3. Plat mat, site map or sketch or building plans.
4. PS Form 1621, Delivery Management Report.
5. Cost Comparison Analysis.
6. Diagrams.
7. PS Form 7381, Requisition for Supplies, Services, or Equipment, if required.
8. PS Forms 697, 4027, and 4003 where applicable.
9. Maintenance work orders.
7-3.3.1 Project Checklist
A project checklist should include a variety of activities required to implement centralized delivery.
7-3.3.2 Made of Delivery Fact Sheet/ Signed Agreement
This document is required when the developer/owner agrees to a centralized mode of delivery. The agreement must include statements from the owner or developer that appropriate delivery options were explained and that the option selected was voluntary. Signatures of both the developer and the USPS representative are required. Provide the developer with a copy of this agreement.
7-3.3.3 Plat Map, Site Map or Sketch
Obtain a plat or site map from the developer/owner. Mark or block off each area to be served and show where the equipment is to be installed. The developer and USPS representative should mutually agree upon sites. The USPS is to make the final determination where centralized equipment will be located.
7-3.3.4 PS Form 1621
A PS Form 1621 should be completed as part of the file. Refer to AMS section for more detailed explanation.
7-3.3.5 Cost Comparison
Complete and include in files, an estimate of cost comparison for either city or rural delivery as necessary.
7-3.3.6 Diagrams
A diagram of each CBU/NDCBU must be completed. These diagrams should be submitted to AMS along with PS Form 1621.
7-3.3.7 PS Form 7381
Complete this form, if required, 30-60 days prior to expected installation date.
7-3.3.8 PS Forms 697, 4027 and 4003
These forms document whether the delivery area qualifies for an extension of city or rural delivery.
7-3.3.9 Maintenance Work Orders
Any orders required for preparation and installation of equipment.
7-3.4 What About the Cost?
While a capital investment cost benefit analysis is not required, it is required that you compare the projected cost of central delivery to the type of delivery that the territory would qualify for if central delivery was not installed. Such a cost comparison is necessary to support a management decision to purchase and install the equipment.
The cost for repair and replacement parts for the first year should be 5 percent of the purchase price of the units in this procurement. However, if practical experience with equipment repairs in your locality or special local circumstances support a higher or lower estimate than as indicated above, that cost estimate should be stated on the worksheet.
In preparing cost comparisons and in deciding whether to purchase and install equipment, you may prepare the comparison either on the basis of the equipment to be installed to meet present delivery needs or, in the case of housing developments which have not been completed, on the basis of the equipment to be installed to meet the needs of the entire development when it is completed.
Unfortunately, the realization of savings from centralizing deliveries is neither guaranteed nor automatic. Offices that install CBU's/NDCBU's or other approved centralized equipment without close supervision and monitoring of carrier workhours lose much of the potential savings.
If a number of units are installed on a route previously classified overburdened, the result should be an increase in productivity for that carrier and the avoidance of extra hours previously spent. If centralized delivery is installed in a new office building on an auxiliary route, the unit managers should determine how much time the new deliveries should take. Carriers assigned to these routes should be informed of these expectations and held to those expectations.
Even where individual segmentation of CBU's/NDCBU's or rotary units is not possible from mail processing, productivity increases may occur by avoiding individual address casing and routing in the office. Flats can basically be routed or undergo the final sort on the street at the centralized unit.
7-3.4.1 How Much Savings Can I Expect?
It is necessary for the local office to determine that curb and/or centralized delivery will be cost effective in each location. A local record should be maintained to support this management determination. The following are examples of hypothetical situations for city delivery.
7-3.4.1.1 Example 1: Curbline Versus Centralized Delivery
A subdivision containing 200 total possible deliveries will soon be completed. What would, be the computed savings with centralized delivery?
The current annual average cost for curb delivery is $154 and $106 for NDCBU delivery. Current figures should be used in all cost analyses.
Cost of curbline 200 deliveries x 154 = $30,800
Cost of NDCBU 200 deliveries* x 106 = $21,200
Difference = Annual Savings = $9,600
*Cost includes cost, maintenance and installation of delivery equipment.
7-3.4.1.2 Example 2: Door-to-Door Versus Centralized
A multi-floor business building (10 floors) or a shopping mall with a total of 100 possible deliveries is still in the planning stage. The architect has called you for information on delivery methods. What would be the annual savings realized for the Postal Service in using centralized delivery for this building?
Cost of door-to-door 100 x 243 = $24,300
Cost of centralized* 100 x110 = $11,000
Difference = Annual Savings = $13,300
7-3.4.2 Is There a Difference on Rural Routes?
In developing this cost analysis, remember that a rural route is given a one minute credit for each centralized box plus a dismount and walking distance time allowance (if the carrier dismounts). The box allowance used in the cost comparison for regular rural mailboxes (curbside receptacles) is 2 minutes per box per week. Your cost comparison should be the current box allowance for regular rural mail receptacles versus the time allotted if centralized delivery was installed.
Note: When a rural route is classified as an "L" route, use 1.64 minutes per week as the rural regular box time allowance.
The manner in which rural carriers are compensated makes It easier to control the impact of growth. It is obviously more beneficial to extend new delivery through centralized boxes rather than regular receptacles. It is also possible to offset the impact of new growth through conversion from regular boxes to centralized deliveries. Delivery through centralized boxes reduces the need to adjust routes and lessens the need to create new routes.
7-3.4.3 Is There Anything Else to Consider?
In computing cost comparisons, keep in mind the total picture. Every situation will have its unique circumstances but some questions to answer that affect cost comparisons are:
1. How will delivery of accountables be affected?
2. How will parcels be delivered?
3. Who will maintain the equipment?
4. Can you convince the customer to provide/purchase receptacles?
5. Can you convince the customer to install the equipment?
6. What can you do in guaranteeing delivery time in return for centralized delivery?
7. What other features can you offer as incentive to select centralized delivery? (i.e., parcel lockers; self- service equipment; specific delivery time; earlier delivery, etc.)
7-3.5 Site Selection
Discuss with the developer location of units for mutual benefit. Select sites for equipment installation that can be safely served by the carrier and used by the customer. Safety and convenience to the customer must be a priority. Plan to assign all compartments in each unit, keeping in mind, however, that no customer should be required to walk more than one block to the CBU/NDCBU site (unless a delivery center is erected and all residents must go to one location to pick up their mail). Each location must have a designated collection compartment for outgoing mail.
Consider locations that maintain compatibility with the landscape, homes, and traffic pattern. Sites should be close to the curb in locations where the units are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles. Where possible, locate the CBU's/NDCBU's so that utilities will not have to be relocated and where access to underground cables, etc., is not unnecessarily restricted.
1. Draw the delivery pattern on the plat map.
2. Start at the entrance of the development and mark tentative unit locations and designate the area each is to serve.
3. Consider the area's growth potential. Plan for the maximum number of deliveries possible at each location. A thorough consideration at this stage will minimize later alterations.
4. If possible, place each unit between the sidewalk and the curb. If there are no sidewalks, units should be located where they are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles.
5. The unit must face away from the street or set back far enough so customers stand on the sidewalk or grass, not in the street.
7-3.5.1 Security
1. Wherever possible, locate CBU's/NDCBU's near streetlights or other night lights to ensure maximum visibility after dark.
2. Avoid locating units in secluded, darkened, and enclosed areas out of public view that could provide cover for vandalism.
3. Avoid placing them near growing shrubbery, trees or other plants that may eventually obscure their visibility.
7-3.5.2 When to Request Delivery and Installation of Equipment
Common sense prevails. The ideal is to get them installed before people start moving in. If possible, it is also very beneficial to get them installed before lots are sold. This results in far fewer customer complaints if they are already aware of the type of mail delivery designated for their neighborhood.
7-3.5.2.1 Factors to Consider
Is the street access clear of vehicles, equipment and materials?
1. Are streets in?
2. Is installation point free of dirt piles and debris?
3. Is the developer ready for installation? (They will normally let us know.) Headquarters policy is that we install centralized delivery equipment as soon as possible ... however if we know that a development is being delayed or there will be a great deal of time before construction begins, it may be wise to delay installation until a more appropriate time.
7-3.5.2.2 Other Factors to Consider
1. ZIP+ 4 - Will the grouping split codes?
2. CRIS - Will grouping cause split scheme items?
3. Will the groupings restrict the ability to adjust routes without causing split scheme items? Will they tie several CBU's/NDCBU's together?
4. Will the placement improve the carrier's line of travel? Provide the minimum number of stops? Backtracks?
5. Will the placement have an adverse visual impact on the homes in the area?
6. Does the placement and grouping of the addresses provide the customer with a convenient location for mail delivery?
7. Is the location safe for the carrier and customer, considering vehicle traffic on the street? Pedestrian traffic? Street lighting? Is there potential for vandalism to USPS equipment?
8. Does the proposed location or address grouping violate any agreements made with the developer? With City or County Planning? Public Works?
7-4 Installation
7-4.1 Overview
This section contains helpful Information for installation of central delivery equipment. The material addresses:
* When and where to install equipment
* Discussion of types of equipment
* Prepping equipment
* Locks and keys
Cluster Box Unit (Type I)
Parcel Locker and NDCBU

The Cluster Box Unit (CBU), which has replaced the NDCBU, has customer compartments 3" high, 12" wide, and 15" deep on the two normal mail volume units (12 customer compartments in the Type 11 CBU and 16 in the Type III). The 13 customer compartments on the high mail volume unit (Type 1) are each 4 3/4" high, 12" wide and 15" deep. All CBU's will include a dedicated, nonconvertible, outgoing mail compartment and one or two parcel lockers.
The units are front loading. They can be mounted flush against a wall or even built into a wall. This feature, along with the wider compartments, is particularly important in commercial applications.
The NDCBU is designed for outdoor use for either commercial or residential mail delivery. The NDCBU is available in three sizes: eight, twelve, and sixteen compartments. Each compartment size is 6" wide, 5" high, and 15" deep. Units also have one compartment designated for out-going mail.
Another piece of equipment that is available for use with NDCBU's is the parcel locker. This unit can be installed next to each NDCBU and can accommodate two parcels, per day. Each parcel locker compartment Is 13" wide, 15" high and 22" deep.
These units are installed on concrete pads facing away from the street. The pad is usually placed directly behind the sidewalk. See the Maintenance Section of the Central Delivery Guidelines for specific instructions for installing concrete pads.
7-4.2 Installation and Deployment
7-4.2.1 Overview
Postal owned delivery equipment should be installed at appropriate locations throughout a development or neighborhood. The installation of postal owned equipment is not applicable to apartment complexes where owners, builders or developers are obligated to provide receptacles in accordance with the Domestic Mail Manual (DMM) D042.9.7 and Postal Operations Manual (POM) 632.6, Apartment House Receptacles.
7-4.2.2 Criteria for Installation
To help assure maximum customer acceptance of centralized equipment postal managers must:
a. Keep informed about community growth and determine the effects on Postal Service requirements. Contact owners, builders and developers early in the planning stages to ensure that the most cost effective delivery service is provided.
b. As with any type of delivery, all requirements must be met before a community can qualify for centralized delivery service. In new city de- livery developments where centralized delivery is being implemented, the 50% improved criteria for the building lots can be waived and service can be started much sooner (see POM 642).
c. Before contacting an owner, builder, or developer, be prepared to answer these types of questions:
1. What type of service will be provided? - answer: give policy and all options for delivery.
2. What types of equipment will be required? - answer: apartment boxes, 2900 series PO boxes, CBU's/NDCBU's,
3. What type of equipment will the USPS provide? - answer: 2900 series PO boxes, CBU's/NDCBU's, Parcel Lockers, collection equipment, vending equipment, etc.
4. What is required of the owner, builder, or developer?
5. What does centralized delivery equipment look like? (Have pictures and literature available.)
6. Who will install the equipment and when? (Negotiable - Builder, USPS, Contractor)
7. Who will maintain the equipment? (Negotiable - Home-owners Association, Management Company, USPS)
8. What is the incidence of mailbox vandalism in the surrounding area? Check with Inspection Service, if necessary. Where high vandalism rates are found, remind the builder that individual locked receptacles provide better security.
d. Installation of central delivery equipment should be made before the first customers move in. This will avoid inconvenience to initial customers and once the units are in place in a development, they will be more readily acceptable to the newly arriving customers.
e. Contact owners, builders, developers or local government authorities for clearance or approval to install delivery equipment. If you have difficulty obtaining this approval, contact the District for assistance.
f. Select locations for equipment installations that can be safely served by the carrier, and used by the customer, and that maintain compatibility with the landscape, homes, and traffic pattern.
1. Sites should be close to the curb in locations where the units are not in danger of being damaged by vehicles. Where possible, locate the centralized delivery equipment so that utilities will not need to be relocated and where access to underground cables, etc., is not unnecessarily restricted. The carrier door should face the street and the customer doors should face the sidewalk side of the unit. Customers should not stand in the street to retrieve mail. CBU's are front loading and should face the sidewalk or be set back far enough so the customer stands off the curb or street.
2. Where possible try to group the boxes to serve enough deliveries at each location to justify parcel lockers. In business applications, parcel lockers should be included regardless of the number of deliveries. All CBUs include at least one parcel locker.
3. Plan to assign all compartments in each unit keeping in mind, how- ever, that no customer should be required to walk more than one block to the centralized delivery site, unless a delivery center is erected and all residents must go to one location to pick up their mail. Keep in mind that some developments lend themselves to central delivery more than others. If a group of single family attached homes (townhouses) has a large recreation area at the center of the neighborhood, this may be an ideal location to group the mailboxes. At the same time, if a rural development is built, and the homes are to be placed on lots of four to five acres in size, it would not be in the best interests of the customer to place all the mailboxes in one location, five miles from one side of the development. Customer convenience must be given first priority.
4. AMS guidelines must be considered, block face intersections, extensions of blocks and other items that determine ZIP+4 codes.
g. A CBU/NDCBU Master File containing a completed roster for every unit installed (filed alphabetically by street name served) and a list in ID number order showing the manufacturer, type, location, installation date and carrier route number must be maintained at each office. The purpose of the file is threefold:
1. To ensure that ID numbers are not duplicated.
2. To provide quick reference for maintenance purposes.
3. To provide a reference for looking up corresponding compartment and ID numbers for customer addresses.
Note: When CBU's are installed their serial numbers should be included in the Master File.
h. Parcel lockers may be used in conjunction with postal-owned or customer-owned delivery equipment. In general, deployment should be one compartment for every 20 deliveries. When parcel lockers are deployed, a letter explaining the operation of the locker should be placed in each customer's box.
1. Number each compartment. Do not repeat any number within the same complex. Be sure to write your delivery ZIP Code and the location address on the key tag. it is wise to keep 2 extra keys on file and replace the lock or make extra keys before using the last key.
2. Maintain a parcel locker log showing the manufacturer, location, installation date, and date of any required maintenance and safety inspections.
7-4.2.3 Site Selection
7-4.2.3.1 Overview
Centralized delivery equipment must be located properly to assure customer convenience and operational benefits. To accomplish this, the postal manager must:
a. Plan the Delivery Pattern with Station/Branch managers or super- visors and carriers if possible.
1. Consider the travel patterns of surrounding routes.
2. Use a plat map of the subdivision to lay out the delivery pattern.
3. Choose a travel pattern that is safe and compact.
4. Avoid any backing up or duplication in line of travel.
5. Avoid requiring carriers to crisscross streets unless absolutely necessary.
6. Consider future growth. A thorough consideration at this stage will minimize later alterations.
b. Locate Sites. Discuss potential sites with the developer. Ultimately, the decision rests with USPS.
1. Draw the delivery pattern on the plat map.
2. Start at the entrance of the subdivision and mark tentative unit locations and designate the area each is to serve.
3. Consider the area's growth potential.
4. Consider the following:
(a) Visibility and fighting.
(b) Safety.
(c) Cost.
(d) Traffic volume/speed.
(e) Flooding.
(f) Irrigation.
(g) Convenient for customer/carrier.
(h) AMS coordination.
(i) Property line.
(j) Avoid front of residence when possible.
(k) Easement.
(l) Aesthetics.
(m) Utilities above or under ground.
(n) Projected street improvement.
(o) Customers/carrier parking.
(p) Avoid secluded, darkened areas.
c. Obtain Final Approval. After all locations are selected, obtain final approval from owner, builder, developer, or local government authority. (See the Planning section in the Central Delivery Guidelines.) These approvals should be retained in the office for at least 5 years beyond the completion of the development or as long as the equipment is in service.
7-4.2.3.2 Collection Service
Each centralized, delivery location must provide a mail slot for the collection of mail. Standardize the location of the collection compartment and highlight the interior of the unit using paint, tape or special label for ease of employee awareness Place label 55-C on the side of the designated collection compartment. CBU's include a factory labeled outgoing mail slot identified as "Outgoing Mail" so label 55-C is not necessary.
In areas designated for centralized delivery service, the postal manager should review the existing collection service, in accordance with 315.32 and 323.2 of the POM. All collection points requiring a separate pick up must be approved by the local official in charge of collections.
7-4.2.3.3 AMS (ZIP+4)
If units will be installed in a non-coded area, the postal manager must notify AMS using PS Form 1621 as soon as possible. Refer to reverse side of PS Form 1621 Section IV for other documentation.
a. If possible, include copy of Plat map showing street names, addresses, and locations of delivery equipment. (OR) provide as much info as possible.
b. Contact the AMS Manager to ensure the assigned codes are compatible with the delivery pattern.
c. Exercise care (when locating equipment to coincide with the previously assigned 4-digit code) to ensure that customers are not required to travel an excessive distance.
d. Refer to AMS section for more detailed information.
7-4.2.3.4 Inspection Prior to Installation
Even though USPS representatives at the manufacturers' plants randomly inspect equipment, you should randomly select and open shipping packages to inspect for the following items:
1. Is the unit free from damage that may have been caused by improper handling, during shipping?
2. Is the unit free from sharp edges, corners, protruding rivets, rust, chipped paint, and operational features that might injure or hamper the carrier or customer?
3. Do compartment doors operate freely, do they bind or have excessive play?
4. Does the master loading door operate freely, does it bind or have excessive play?
5. Is access to the compartments free from restriction caused by the master loading door?
6. Are the compartment openings free from restriction caused by the compartment door framework or the supporting members?
7. Is one compartment of the unit convertible to a collection receptacle?
8. Are installation instructions and necessary hardware included?
9. Are seams and connections tight?
If deficiencies are detected, the postal manager must notify the office that purchased the equipment. A report of the defects should be provided to the Purchasing Service Center.
7-4.2.3.5 Rosters
Offices should maintain a roster to obtain information and control maintenance. Included in this section are samples of manual and computerized rosters.
7-4.3 Prepping the CBU/NDCBU
7-4.3.1 Overview
1. Using the completed roster as a guide, write, label or otherwise place the corresponding addresses in each compartment. Be sure the carrier can easily read the addresses. Street name and number range should be placed on the inside of the left loading door (NDCBU). In the CBU, place this information on the lip below each compartment so it is not visible to the customer.
2. Remove the customer keys and package them in a manner that will ensure that the correct keys are issued for each compartment.
3. Install the arrow lock and lock the unit. The door should lock easily.
4. Place Label 55-A (Eagle) on side box facing carrier's approach. In multiple box locations, put a label on each end box.
5. Place Label 55-C on any compartment opened for collection. Do not place Label 55-C or Label 55-D on the CBU.
6. Place ID # on the box so as to be easily seen by the customer (vertically on the customer side of the pedestal or on the side of the unit).
ID #'s are not to be duplicated within any delivery ZIP Code. The first two (2) numbers of the ID # will be the last two (2) numbers of the delivery zone ZIP Code. These last three (3) numbers will be assigned sequentially beginning with 001. For example the ID # of the first NDCBU installed in the 33602 zone would be 02001. ID NUMBERS ARE NOT TO BE PLACED ON CUSTOMER OWNED CBU's/NDCBU's.
Note: The CBU's have individual serial #'s and can be tracked by that as well as the ID.

7-4.3.2 Suggested Labeling Techniques (Inside)
1. Brother P-Touch labeling device.
2. Engraved Plastic - Glue on (Tape).
3. Engraved Plastic - Snap-in.
4. Metal Foil - Engraved numbers.
5. Metal Foil - Typed numbers.
6. Metal Foil - Indelible Marker.
7. Plasticized Paper - Kroy Machine.
8. Plasticized Paper - Stencils.
9. Dymo Tape (with improved glue) - Large Type 1/2".
10. C.A.S.E. Labels with plastic coating and 2 sided Tape
7-4.3.3 Numbering and Locks and Keys
Postal managers should number centralized delivery equipment as follows:
a. Assign postal owned equipment an Identifying number or letter.
b. Place this identification number on each unit. Use plastic stick-on decals or stencils. These numbers are not to be used in the customer's mailing address. Use 2" blue aluminum numbers. Check locally for availability. Lustre Cal in California manufactures labels with serialized numbers in sequence; for a catalog, call (209) 334-6263.
c. Label the inside bottom ledge of each compartment with the address assigned to it, in sequence, when practical, from top to bottom and from left to right. When labeling a CBU, put names and addresses on the lip below each compartment so they will not be visible when customers open their compartments. You must work closely with the AMS unit to assure maximum benefits from the installation of centralized delivery equipment.
d. The compartment doors may be numbered on the front, in sequence, from top to bottom and from left to right. These compartment numbers must not be used as part of the customer mailing address. The customers' names and street numbers must not appear on the outside of the compartment.
e. Send a copy of the subdivision plat map to AMS. This map must include street names, approved street numbers, and location of equipment. Areas to be served by each unit should also be noted on this plat map for final approval by AMS office.
f. Place the assigned compartment numbers on a roster of equipment locations (see examples in this section). This roster should include as a minimum, the unit identification number, the location of the unit, the addresses served at each unit (including ZIP+4 Codes), serial # if CBU, and the date the unit became functional. It should be prepared before the unit is placed in service. These rosters are to be kept in the delivery office as long as the equipment is operational.
g. Notice 69-B, Neighborhood Delivery and Collection Box, can be completed by the postmaster or designee. The completed form can be given to the real estate salesman, or sales office for issuance to the buyer upon completion of the sale or left by the carrier at each residence where lt will be found by the new occupant.
h. If a person with disabilities cannot reach their compartment, exchange compartments to a lower compartment or extend delivery to their residence.
7-4.3.4 Supplying Locks and Keys
The Postal Service supplies all compartment locks and three keys. Customers may duplicate keys at no expense to the Postal Service.
Postal managers should take the following actions in issuing and controlling locks and keys:
a. Postal management has the responsibility for establishing procedures for distribution and storage of keys for centralized delivery equipment.
b. For CBU's/NDCBU's, give all compartment keys to the customer with a notice stating that the Postal Service keeps no duplicate keys and if all keys are lost a new lock will have to be installed at their expense. Refer to Section 3, Policy, page 5 for additional information.
c. Ask customers to return all compartment keys to the post office when they move from their residence. When a customer moves, the lock should be changed before the compartment is reissued.
d. Where all of the compartments are not assigned, locks and cams for the unassigned compartments may be used as replacements. Remove and switch locks between an unassigned compartment and the customer's compartment requiring a new lock. To keep the doors secure, always re- install a lock (in the locked position) in all unassigned compartments.
e. Postal management should provide the customer with instructions on proper operating procedures for all centralized delivery equipment.
f. When new centralized delivery equipment is installed, remove all keys and store them at the post office.
g. Keep all keys for unassigned compartments at the post office.
h. Suggested method of storage is to use P-570 envelopes labeled with address, compartment number, CBUINDCBU location, and identifying number of the unit.
i. For parcel locker customer keys:
1. When not in use, the parcel locker compartments must be kept in a locked position.
2. The keys for compartments not in use should be kept in the outgoing mail compartment of the accompanying NDCBU, or in a Parcel locker key holder (PSIN D1199).
3. Carriers must check all parcel lockers each delivery day and remove customer keys not in use. Follow procedures outlined above.
4. In post offices, the customer keys should be secured behind the screen line when not in use. Parcel lockers in postal facilities should be checked a minimum of once a day for customer keys left in the lock.
5. For more detailed information on parcel lockers, refer to Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-4.3.5 Locks and Keys
Customer door locks for CBU's/NDCBU's are available as an item of supply at the Materiel Distribution Centers.
Order locks and cams during your normal requisitioning cycle using PS Form 7380, MDC Supply Requisition. Cite the Postal Service item number and required quantity. The unit of issue for either locks or cams is one package of ten each so don't mistakenly order ten times the required quantity.
A listing showing the item numbers and application for NDCBU locks and cams can be found in Maintenance Bulletin MMO-4M4 (see Maintenance section in Central Delivery Guidelines). Note that lock 0910A replaces the discontinued 0910C. All Weather Parcel Lockers and CBUs require lock number 09108. Cams for them can be ordered directly from the respective manufacturer.
Customer door locks for p.o. box modules are ordered in the same fashion as CBU/NDCBU locks. Item number 03068 is used in box modules 2901-2903 and 0306D in 2904 and 2905 modules. Keys cannot be locally duplicated but replacement keys can be ordered from the Mail Equipment Shops on PS Form 3915, Post Office Box Key Requisition. Non-accountable locks, which have keys that can be locally duplicated, are expected to be available in FY 94.
Arrow Locks: Use PS Form 4983, Postal Key and Lock Requisition, to order arrow locks. Please note that there are two types of arrow locks:
a. Regular arrow locks - for use in most apartment style boxes and NDCBU's/CBU's
b. Y type arrow locks - for use in rotary cabinets and some NDCBU's.
7-4.3.6 After Installation
Visit the site and verify proper installation of equipment and perform slab inspection. The slab(s) should conform to the approved design (see MMO-18-92) unless; "Local conditions such as retaining walls or covering of an existing drainage ditch mitigate the use of these designs. We recommend that any design not conforming to the standard details be approved by a Facilities Service Office or Facilities Service Center. The intent is that a qualified architect or engineer would review and approve any alternate design."
a. Make sure that unit is installed in the proper location, facing the direction you specified (customer compartment facing away from street).
b. Shake unit vigorously. Make sure that the pedestal is secure on the slab and that the head of the box is secure on the pedestal. Check entire unit for potential safety hazards.
c. Are there obvious cracks or imperfections in the slab?
d. Are the units level and correctly spaced?
e. If the unit has not been prepped, secure customer keys and install the arrow lock.
f. If the customer installed the equipment and it passes inspection, it is ready to service.
7-4.4 Preparing the CBU/NDCBU Roster
a. Working with the developer, determine the locations) where CBU's/NDCBU's will be installed.
b. Establish which addresses will be served by each location; determine the number and type (I, II, III) of CBU's/NDCBU's needed to serve the addresses.
c. Be sure to select the CBU/NDCBU types that will efficiently serve the location while still keeping segmentation in mind.
d. A roster must be completed for each postal owned unit deployed. Take the time to fill out the roster completely and correctly. To do so:
1. All entries should be printed and legible.
2. Fill out the top portion of the roster. If you fill out the roster prior to installation, be sure to go back and fill in the installation date.
3. Complete the address, portion of the roster by entering the street name, suffix and number in the appropriate places. Keep addresses in sequential order flow to high). Do not separate odd and even numbers.
4. Addresses are to begin at the upper left compartment (carrier view) and then go down and across.
5. If a compartment is to be used for collections, write "collection" or "outgoing mail" on the appropriate compartment line instead of a numerical entry.
6. If there will be extra compartments, write "not used" on the appropriate compartment line instead of a numerical entry.
7. Write the sector number in the appropriate box. Refer to your delivery zone (AMS) map to obtain the correct sector number.
e. The completed roster may now be used as a guide for filling out the key envelopes. Whenever possible, the rosters and key envelopes should be prepared in advance of equipment installation.
7-5 Optional Equipment
7-5.1 Neighborhood Delivery and Collection Box Units (NDCBU's)
Standard NDCBU equipment has fixed mounting pedestals that secure the unit for customers to conveniently retrieve their mail. In some locations, due to heavy snow accumulations or when the box is located too close to fences, walls, etc., the carrier experiences difficulties in serving rear loading NDCBU's.
A locking NDCBU carousel pedestal, that permits the customer compartments section to rotate 180 degrees, is available to reduce carrier difficulty in serving rear loading NDCBUS. The equipment requires the use of a standard Arrow lock and must not be used without it. Offices ordering the carousel NDCBU pedestal should assure that an adequate supply of Arrow locks is on hand.
The carousel pedestal can be used with NDCBU's manufactured by Bommer, American Device, Auth, Florence and Cutler-Federal. This equipment can be purchased from:
Page Specialty Company
5777 South Fulton Way
Englewood CO 80111-3719
(800) 327-7439.
7-6 Maintenance
7-6.1 General
This section provides valuable information concerning maintenance of central delivery equipment. It Includes:
* Samples of Lock Repair Requests.
* CBU/NDCBU Winterizing Tips.
* Work Order Requests.
* Maintenance Bulletins.
7-6.2 Responsibility
Once delivery equipment is installed, you have the responsibility to make sure that it continues to work properly. Poorly maintained mail receptacles really hurt our image. Builders will be reluctant to choose centralized delivery for future developments if existing units are not maintained properly.
7-6.2.1 Installation
Installation of centralized delivery equipment is accomplished in one of three ways. In some cases, the builders will install postal supplied equipment. In other cases, the USPS installs the equipment either with our own labor force or through the use of local contractors.
Centralized delivery equipment must be installed in conformance with the applicable USPS standards and regulations, and the manufacturer's installation instructions. Additional instructions can be found in the appropriate maintenance bulletins contained in this section.
Planning for installation of centralized delivery equipment should be completed as soon as possible after delivery requirements are determined so that scheduling of installation personnel can be accomplished with the least amount of disruption to the overall maintenance activity. Contractor support should be arranged if local personnel are not available to accomplish installation tasks. Refer to the Installation section for more information.
Centralized delivery equipment should not be installed unless it has been inspected to ensure proper operation and customer and employee safety. Specific inspection criteria can be found in Maintenance Bulletin MMO-55-81 and in the Installation section in this book.
If deficiencies are identified which appear to be the responsibility of the vendor, the person responsible for the purchasing activity, should be notified so that contact with the vendor can be made and a commitment obtained for timely correction of such deficiencies. A report of defects should also be sent to the Purchasing Service Center.
If the vendor does not commit to a timely correction process, USPS maintenance personnel should undertake correction activity. All repair activities performed by USPS personnel to correct apparent vendor deficiencies should be documented in terms of workhours and material costs and submitted to local procurement services. Use PS Form 4568, Postal Equipment Problem Feedback, to advise the appropriate offices of deficient equipment (see MMO-73-84).
A copy of this report should be sent to the Maintenance Technical Support Center, Attn: Plant Equipment Branch, PO. Box 1600, Norman, OK 73070-6704 and the Purchasing Service Center in your area. A list of these offices is in the Purchasing section of Central Delivery Guidelines.
7-6.2.2 Maintenance
Maintenance personnel should expedite all repair requests (PS Form 4805, Maintenance Work Order Request). Local site personnel or local locksmiths normally perform minor repairs, including customer lock replacements, if necessary.
Generally, on-site tasks are limited to replacing customer locks, or replacing a component that is readily accessible and replaceable. When an employee is on site making minor repairs, he should also apply a small amount of lubricant especially designed for locks to each customer door lock, being careful to wipe off any excess. For additional information, see "Customer Lock Replacement" in this section.
Major or more complex maintenance tasks range from replacing a damaged CBU/NDCBU to replacing a carrier access lock/door. When centralized delivery equipment or pedestals require a repair that cannot be accomplished on site, the unit or pedestal should be replaced. If an entire unit must be replaced, every effort should be made to interchange the locks so that customers are not adversely affected by the interchange. Any box identification numbers or other information on the loading side of the equipment should also be transferred.
7-6.2.3 Spare Parts
Spare parts can be obtained from units classified as nonserviceable. A nonserviceable unit is one that has been damaged beyond repair. Before these units are sold as scrap or salvage, attempt to retrieve any usable spare parts, i.e., compartment doors, latches, locking mechanisms, etc.). Catalogue and store spare parts for future use.
Purchase parts for centralized delivery equipment from the manufacturer or their distributors. A distributor list, giving the name, address, phone number and spare parts breakdown is provided with some manufacturers' installation and maintenance instructions. A parts list can be found by referring to the appropriate maintenance bulletin. The requiring office can order spare parts directly from the manufacturers.
Customer lacks and cams can be obtained from the supply centers. Some replacement pedestals for older units manufactured by Superior and American Device can be obtained from the western area supply center. (Ref. maintenance bulletin MMO-41-87)
7-6.2.4 Arrow Locks
Maintenance offices must maintain an adequate supply of Arrow Locks and keys. Reorder, as local needs dictate, on PS Form 4983 and send to the Mail Equipment Shop in Washington, DC.
7-6.3 Reporting Maintenance Actions
7-6.3.1 General
Most maintenance work will be corrective, lock replacement, unit or pedestal replacement, etc.) The local office initiates repairs using Form 4805. In cases involving safety related defects, requests for maintenance may be verbal to expedite repairs; however, such requests and subsequent work must always be recorded on PS Form 4805.
Safety related repairs might require completion of a Form 1767, Report of a Hazardous, Unsafe Condition or Practice. Carriers should use Form 1624, Delivery and Collection Equipment Work Request, to advise management of required repairs.
7-6.3.2 Customer Lock Replacement
There are basically 4 methods of handling replacement of customer locks.
1. In many multi-residential dwelling units, the lock changes are handled by the complex management. (The Postal Service supplies replacement locks free of charge for Postal owned equipment.)
2. The delivery unit (management personnel, custodial, carrier) may handle lock changes.
3. Customer locks can be changed by maintenance.
4. Use local locksmiths.
Note: The U.S. Postal Service does not repair or supply and change compartment locks for privately owned mail receptacles.
7-6.3.3 Paint
Exact paint matching is difficult since paint types and colors are not standard among box manufacturers. Local offices must stock only one type and color of paint to support refinishing needs. Paints listed in the General Service Administrative (GSA) catalog in colors that are similar to the finishes on the majority of the units are as follows:
* Semi-Gloss (Fed. Std. 595 Color No. 26492)
7-6.3.4 Rust Protection for NDCBUs
At this time, the office of Maintenance Management does not advocate the use of any specific rust proofing products. For treatment of minor rust problems, there are on the market a number of commercially available products that can be purchased locally (follow the instructions on the label). Where serious problems are encountered, the equipment should be replaced as soon as possible to avoid any serious safety hazard.
Note: CBU's are manufactured with aluminum or plastic material and should not rust.
7-6.3.5 Results of Inspection Service Audit
Some examples of maintenance problems were identified during a recent Inspection Service audit. They are:
a. Inconsistencies in construction of concrete pads.
b. Lack of preventative maintenance.
c. Safety is not always considered in installation sites.
d. Inferior quality of address labels inside units.
e. Collection compartments are not always provided.
f. Unsightly units are not repaired in a timely manner.
g. Poor record keeping of maintenance expenditures.
h. Units not installed in locations where lighting and visibility would enhance mail security.
Attention to such problems will improve management of central delivery. Use the Equipment Checklist (see Safety section in this book) to assist with this process. Additionally, use your carriers as a source of information. Encourage them to tell you when equipment needs repairs. Use PS Form 4805 to report repairs. Follow up on work requests to ensure repairs are made. Your attention to our delivery equipment will let your customers know that you care.
7-7 Safety
7-7.1 Overview
You cannot eliminate all the safety hazards that exist on every route, but by using central delivery equipment, you can minimize their impact on the carrier.
There will be fewer vehicle accidents, because the carrier is not traveling both sides of the street, stopping and starting at every residence to deliver mail.
The carrier is exposed to fewer hazards on the park and loop route, also. Wet grass, slippery sidewalks, and animals may pose a threat causing a serious injury.
Centralizing the delivery points throughout a neighborhood reduces the likelihood of hazards, and diminishes the chance of a painful injury.
In areas where centralized delivery equipment is installed, the USPS must ensure the equipment does not pose any hazard to delivery employees and customers.
Every station and office with central delivery equipment must conduct safety inspections twice a year. The following pages outline procedures and provide samples of checklists to accomplish this task.
7-7.2 Central Delivery Equipment Inspection Procedure
All central delivery equipment and parcel lockers in your delivery area must be inspected for safety defects and maintenance problems.
Each unit in the field must be inspected for the following items:
a. Assure master number is on unit.
b. Address on master list roster must correspond to actual location on street.
c. General condition of units
1. Missing customer doors?
2. Missing customer locks? (replaced by inspector on site)
3. Painting, striping, eagles?
4. Sharp edges?
5. Vandalism?
6. Weather resistant/water tight?
7. Rust?
8. Dented or damaged?
d. Cement slab
1. Condition (any cracks, etc., that would require repouring).
2. Thickness (if obvious).
e. Mounting bolts and/or attachment to cement pad.
1. Any missing?
2. Not tight?
3. Protruding bolts? (tripping hazard)
4. Rust?
f. Attachment of unit to pedestal.
1. Is it secure and all bolts or rivets tightly in place?
2. Rust?
g. Location of unit.
1. Traffic hazard to employee or customer?
2. Carrier and customer footing?
3. Dimly lit (unsafe) location?
4. Approach to unit from either side?
h. Carrier door retainers?
i. Carrier door's and arrow lock.
1. Open freely?
2. Door hinges okay?
3. Arrow lock operable?
j. Any other condition inspector feels needs to be noted?
When completed, forward inspection forms to proper office for corrective action necessary. Maintain a copy of the completed inspection at your delivery unit.
7-7.3 Parcel Locker Inspection Procedure
Each locker must be inspected for the following items:
a. Locker numbers must appear on or near doors (same number must appear on key or key tags.)
b. Address on master list/roster must correspond to actual location on street.
c. Mounting bolts (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
d. Attachment to pedestal (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
e. Customer locks operate correctly.
1. Locking mechanism operates freely - no sticking.
2. Customer lock will NOT allow door to be locked without arrow (control) key.
f. General condition of unit.
1. Painting, striping, eagles?
2. Vandalism?
3. Door hinges?
4. Sharp edges?
g. Cement slab (same criteria as for CBU's/NDCBU's).
7-8 Parcel Lockers
7-8.1 General
Parcel lockers may be used for delivery of parcels and all other classes of mall, and may be provided by either the developer/owner or by the U.S. Postal Service when requirements are met.
Approval for installation of parcel lockers is contingent upon a determination by the local postal manager that the proposed area to be served qualifies for delivery service, that the equipment to be installed has been approved by the U.S. Postal Service, and that suitable arrangements can be made for location of these parcel lockers.
Postal Managers must evaluate the needs of a delivery area prior to approving installation and use of parcel lockers, considering security, safety, operational effectiveness and customer convenience. Generally, the normal parcel volume must justify equipment purchase and installation.
Parcel Lockers may be used as an adjunct to post office box, door, curbside or centralized delivery. There are no restrictions due to existence of city or rural delivery service. Keep a sufficient amount of equipment on hand to meet immediate centralized delivery needs, such as business complexes, mobile homes, conversions, and shopping malls.
Purchase of parcel lockers must be from manufacturers whose equipment has been approved by the U.S. Postal Service. Firms interested in the manufacture of parcel lockers should write to the Purchasing Department, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-6220.


7-8.2 Are Parcel Lockers Needed?
Many factors have to be considered before parcel lockers are included in a NDCBU installation. Some of these are:
* Do the users of the centralized delivery equipment receive enough parcels to warrant a parcel locker?
* Parcel lockers are more susceptible to vandalism (because of the ease of breaking off keys). Consider the likelihood of vandalism before installation. Maintenance is deluged with requests for parcel locker lock changes. Advising letter carriers to keep the parcel locker keys in the NDCBU when the parcel locker is empty can minimize this problem. The keys can be stored in a vacant compartment or in the outgoing mail compartment. To assist in this area, a Parcel Locker Key Holder Modification Kit has been developed (PSIN DI 1991).
* The installation of parcel lockers is a management decision - no one knows your area as well as you. Your judgment is the key to an effective Installation.
7-9 Approved Manufacturers
Note: These lists are updated on a regular basis. For the most current information, please contact your Purchasing Service Center.
7-9.1 All Weather Parcel Lockers
American Locker Group, Inc.
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118 (outside New York)
(plastic)
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(painted steel)
7-9.2 Centralized Delivery Equipment
Effective May 1997, the following are approved manufacturers of Centralized Delivery Equipment. This list is updated and published periodically in the Postal Bulletin. You should copy it and use as a handout for customers who need this information. Note the date of approval.
N = NDCBU.
H = Horizontal Apartment Style Boxes. Note: Apartment style boxes are approved for installation; however, the Postal Service is prohibited from purchasing this equipment at this time. You may order replacement parts for Postal owned equipment that was installed in the past.
V = Vertical Apartment Style Boxes.
P = Parcel Locker.
U = Universal and Carousel Pedestals.
C = Cluster Box Unit.
American Locker Group
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118 (outside NY)
-P/C
Auth-Florence Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
-N/H/U/V
Bommer Industries
P.O. Box 187
Landrum, SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
-N/H/V
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
-N/H/V/P
Jensen Industries
1946 E 46th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90058-2097
800-826-7001 (CA only)
800-325-6800
-H/V
Mail Security
714 West Florence Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90044-6106
213-750-7844
-V
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 30111-3719
303-770-2842 (CO only)
800-327-7439
-U
Salsbury Industries
1010 East 62nd Street
Los Angeles, CA 90001-1598
213-232-6181
-V
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grapevine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
-H/V/U
7-9.3 CBU/NDCBU Locks
Hudson Lock, Inc.
81 Apsley Street
Hudson, MA 01749-1547
508-562-3481
Hurd Corporation
503 Bohannon Avenue
P.O. Box 145
Greenville, TN 37744-1450
423-787-8800
National Cabinet Look
200 Old Mill Road
P.O. Box 200
Mauldin, SC 29662-0200
Note: Locks should be ordered from the Topeka material distribution center:
500 SW Montara Pkwy
Topeka, KS 66624-9998
785-267-8704
FAX 785-267-8706
7-9.4 KeyKeeper Devices (Suggested Sources)
American Device Mfg. Co.
P.O. Box 8
Steelville, IL 62288-0008
800-637-3763
American Locker Group, Inc.
Rollform Division
181-T Blackstone Ave.
Jamestown, NY 14701-2203
716-665-5310
Bommer Industries, Inc.
P.O. Box 187
Landrum, SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
Cutler Manufacturing Corp.
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
Dan L. Downing
7273 Paldao Drive
Dallas, TX 75240-2740
214-239-1973
Jensen Industries
1946 E 46th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90058-2096
800-826-7001
800-325-6800 (CA only)
Mail Security
133 East 140th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90061-2117
Miami-Carey Corporation
203-T Garver Road
Monroe, OH 45050-1292
513-539-8441
New York Boxes, Inc.
1068 Brook Avenue
Bronx, NY 10456-5204
212-638-4446
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grape Vine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
Sentinel Diversified Ind., Inc.
2043 Wellwood Avenue
East Farmingdale, NY 11735-1283
516-753-6000
7-9.5 Cluster Box Units
American Locker Group, Inc.
P.O. Box 1000
Jamestown, NY 14702-1000
716-664-9600
800-828-9118
(outside New York)
(plastic)
Auth-Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(painted aluminum)
Cutler Manufacturing Corporation
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(painted aluminum)
7-9.6 Universal Pedestals Only
Cutler Manufacturing Corp.
3240 Flightline Drive
Lakeland, FL 33811-2844
800-237-2312
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 80111-3719
800-327-7439
303-770-2842
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Auth-Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(unpainted anodized aluminum)
Security Manufacturing
815 South Main Street
Grapevine, TX 76051-5535
800-762-6937
(painted aluminum)
7-9.7 Carrousel Pedestals
Page Specialty Company
5877 South Fulton Way
Englewood, CO 80111-3719
800-327-7439
303-770-2842
(painted steel)
7-9.8 NDCBU's (All-aluminum units for replacement purchase only)
Note: Aluminum pedestals may also be purchased separately from the suppliers under "Universal Pedestals."
Auth Florence Manufacturing Corporation
2101 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3993
800-275-1747
(aluminum box & pedestal)

Bommer Industries
P.O. Box 187
Landrum. SC 29356-0187
800-334-1654
(aluminum box ONLY, steel pedestal is not approved)

8 Financial Relationships
8-1 Overview
The Department of Defense takes its fiduciary responsibility to the American public seriously. Extensive programs have been put in place to control costs and to ensure that the level of services purchased is required by business goals.
This chapter provides the USPS branch manager with information on financial issues that could be of concern to the Department of Defense community. This chapter places financial product types into the following groups:
a. Permit Imprints.
b. Meters.
For details on any of these financial issues, please contact your district Marketing manager or the district Finance manager.
8-2 Permit Imprints
8-2.1 Overview
A permit imprint is a simple way for Department of Defense installations to pay postage. With a permit imprint, Department of Defense installations can mail First-Class Mail and Standard Mail without affixing metered or stamped postage. Instead, at the time of the mailing, they pay postage from an advance deposit account. Department of Defense installations must be authorized by the Postal Service before using permit imprints.
Permit imprint mailings must contain at least 200 addressed pieces or 50 pounds of addressed pieces. (Certain mailings, such as Presorted First-Class Mail, may require more pieces.) Each piece must have a permit imprint indicia showing that postage is paid. Department of Defense installations must take these mailings to business mail entry units.
8-2.2 Customer Benefits
Permit imprints offer the following benefits to Department of Defense installations and the military mail manager:
a. Eliminate the time and expense of affixing postage to each mail piece.
b. Pay fees for special services as well as postage.
8-2.3 Conditions
The following conditions apply to permit imprints:
a. Department of Defense installations need to get a permit. They start the process by filling out PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile.
b. There is a one-time fee of $85.00.
c. Permit imprint mail must be deposited at a business mail entry unit or another location that the postmaster designates - they must not be deposited in street collection boxes.
d. All pieces in a permit imprint mailing must be of identical weight and size unless the U.S. Postal Service authorizes otherwise, such as in a Manifest Mailing System (MMS) mailing.
e. Before designing and producing a permit imprint, see the standards in DMM P040.
f. Under certain conditions, mailers may use a company permit imprint that includes the name of the firm or person who holds the permit in place of the city, state, and permit number. On a Department of Defense installation, this could be applicable to either official mailings or to mailings prepared by or for a government contractor. See DMM P040.
g. If no mailings are made for 2 years, the U.S. Postal Service revokes the permit.
8-2.4 Frequently Asked Questions
1. Where may I deposit permit imprint mail?
Take permit imprint mail to the business mail entry unit where the permit was issued. In some cases this may be the local U.S. post office on the installation, but normally it will be a separate facility. You may not deposit permit imprint mail in a street collection box.
2. What do I need to use permit imprints?
First, you must get authorization from the Postal Service.
3. How do I receive authorization from the Postal Service?
Fill out PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile.
4. Is there a permit application fee?
Yes, there is a one-time fee of $85. (There is no other fee for the use of permit imprints as long as the permit remains active, but other fees - for example, an annual bulk mailing fee - may be due depending on the class of mail to be prepared.)
5. What is the minimum volume or weight for a permit imprint mailing?
Each mailing must contain at least 200 addressed pieces or 50 pounds of addressed pieces.
Higher minimums may be required for certain types of mailings.
6. May I use a permit imprint to pay for special services as well as postage?
Yes.
8-2.5 Where to Go for Details
See the following publications for more details on permit imprints:
a. For an overview, see Quick Service Guide 025 (published at the front of the DMM).
b. To apply for a permit imprint, use for PS Form 3615.
c. To design and produce a permit imprint, see the standards in DMM P040.
d. To use a company imprint, see DMM P040.3.4. If the Department of Defense installation and/or a contractor desires to use this type of permit imprint, the proper procedures must be followed, including the use of a complete domestic return address.
e. For detailed information on permit imprints, see DMM P040.
8-3 Meters
8-3.1 Overview
Using meters is the normal method of postage payment on Department of Defense installations. With a postage meter, Department of Defense installations can imprint mail on site at the military mail center with the postage, the city and state of mailing, the meter number, and the date (optional for Standard Mail). To use postage meters, the customer does the following:
a. Get a postage meter license. (See 8-3.3.)
b. Establish and maintain an account with the U.S. Postal Service.
c. Lease a postage meter from an approved manufacturer. (See 8-3.4.)
d. Bring the postage meter to the U.S. Postal Service and pay the postage amount to be set on the meter. The Postal Service sets, seals, and checks the meter into service. Meters may also be set remotely through the Remote Meter Setting program.
8-3.2 Customer Benefits
Postage meters offer the following benefits to Department of Defense installations:
a. Cost efficiency. The timesavings generated through meter use, and the capability of tracking exact postage costs through meter software, offset the cost of maintaining an account and leasing a postage meter.
b. Flexibility. Meters can be used with all classes of mail except Periodicals.
c. Convenience. There is no need to maintain and apply a wide variety of stamps, or to purchase new stamps or incremental stamps when rates change.
d. Ease. For mailings of non-standard or non-uniform weights, there is no need to apply stamps having different values in order to affix the proper postage.
8-3.3 Conditions
Department of Defense installations need to get a license from the U.S. Postal Service to use a postage meter. There is no fee for the application and license. They fill out PS Form 3601-A, Application or Update for a License to Lease and Use Postage Meters, and submit the form to each post office where they plan to deposit metered mail (for Department of Defense installations, this normally is the USPS branch office located on the installation). Each application covers all the postage meters licensed by one post office.
Department of Defense installations that want to present the following categories of mail must complete and submit PS Form 3615, Mailing Permit Application and Customer Profile, in addition to Form 3601-A:
a. Presorted First-Class Mail.
b. Bulk Standard Mail (A).
c. Bulk Parcel Post.
d. Bulk Bound Printed Matter.
e. Presorted Special Standard Mail.
The following conditions apply:
a. No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter without a valid Postal Service postage meter license and a lease/rental agreement with a meter manufacturer.
b. No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter that the Postal Service has not set, sealed, and checked into service.
c. Generally, metered mail must be deposited where the postmaster of the licensing post office designates. For exceptions, see DMM P030.5.
d. Metered mail can be drop-shipped. See DMM D072.
e. The meter stamp and date must meet certain guidelines. See DMM P030.4.
8-3.4 Meter Manufacturers
No Department of Defense installation may possess a postage meter without a valid Postal Service postage meter license and a lease/rental agreement with a meter manufacturer. Contact the local representative of the following USPS-approved meter manufacturers for more information:
ASCOM HASLER MAILING SYSTEMS INC
19 FOREST PKWY
SHELTON CT 06484-0903
FRANCOTYP-POSTALIA INC
1980 UNIVERSITY LN
LISLE IL 60532-2152
NEOPOST
30955 HUNTWOOD AVE
HAYWARD CA 94544-7005
PITNEY BOWES INC
1 ELMCROFT RD
STAMFORD CT 06926-0700
8-3.5 Frequently Asked Questions
1. May I use postage meters for all classes of mail?
You may use meters for everything except Periodicals.
2. What do I need to use a postage meter?
First, you must get authorization from the Postal Service.
3. What do I do first to get authorization from the Postal Service?
Fill out Form 3601-A, Application or Update for a License to Lease and Use Postage Meters, for each post office where you will deposit metered mail.
4. Is there a permit application fee?
No.
5. Where can I deposit metered mail?
Take it to the post office that holds your license or to another designated location.
6. How do I find a manufacturer approved by the Postal Service?
See 8-4.4 for companies authorized by the Postal Service to manufacture and lease postage meters.
8-3.6 Where to Go for Details
See the following publications for more details on permit imprints:
a. For an overview, see Quick Service Guide 024 (published at the front of the DMM).
b. To apply for a license to use postage meters, ask for Form 3601-A.
c. For detailed information, see DMM P030.

1
Appendix A: Publication 38
Postal Agreement With the Department of Defense (February 1980)
Foreword
Postal service for all branches of the Armed Forces is provided jointly by the U.S. Postal Service and the Department of Defense under terms of a formal agreement as printed in this publication. The Agreement has been published to insure that postal officials concerned with providing postal services to the Armed Forces are fully acquainted with its terms.
Pursuant to paragraph V of the general policy statements of the Agreement, the Postmaster General has designated the Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, as the U.S. Postal Service official to maintain continuing liaison with the military postal authorities and to represent the U.S. Postal Service in carrying out terms of the Agreement.
[signed]
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group
Postal Agreement Between the United States Postal Service and the Department Of Defense
I. Purpose
In recognition of the need for providing coordinated and efficient postal services for the Armed Forces in time of peace, war, or national emergency, and during maneuvers, the Department of Defense and the United States Postal Service consider it appropriate to enter into the following agreement setting forth their respective responsibilities.
II. Definitions
Terms used in this Agreement are defined in Appendix A.
III. Policy
A. The Military Postal Service is operated as an extension of the United States Postal Service as authorized by 39 U.S C. 406.
B. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service agree to attempt to furnish mail service to the military equal to that provided the civilian population in the United States.
C. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service affirm the importance of the national goal of energy conservation, and both parties resolve to minimize energy expenditure while conducting military postal operations.
IV. Responsibilities
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Maintain and operate military post offices in support of Armed Forces operations and personnel at locations outside the United States, or inside the United States where the military situation requires;
2. Ensure that each military post office that provides postal financial or accountable mail services or exchanges incoming and outgoing mail directly with carriers is supervised by at least one qualified, on site, military member of the Armed Forces;
3. Administer the military postal service in accordance with law, with policies and regulations of the Postal Service, and with consistent implementing directives of the Department of Defense;
4. Arrange with foreign governments to permit military post offices to be established and military postal operations to be conducted in foreign countries;
5. Furnish information required by the Postal Service to provide efficient postal services to authorized personnel and units;
6. Establish and operate mail control activities at principal locations used by the Postal Service to receive and dispatch military mail and to provide information to distribute and dispatch mail for overseas and maneuver forces, ships, and other mobile units;
7. In time of war or national emergency, assist or supplement Postal Service operation of bulk mail centers, postal concentration centers, and airport mail facilities;
8. Establish and operate mail control activities at military aerial ports to receive outgoing military mail from the Postal Service for dispatch via military air transport and to receive incoming military mail via military air transport for entry into civilian postal channels;
9. Conduct postal finance services at military post offices, to include selling stamps and stamped paper; issuing domestic money orders; cashing money orders, when feasible, and providing certified, insured, and Registered Mail services. Remittances to the Postal Service shall be in dollars in the amounts required by the schedules of rates, fees, and charges provided by postal regulations;
10. Make periodic audits and inspections of military post offices.
B. The United States Postal Service agrees to:
1. Provide postal services for the Armed Forces at locations inside the United States, including the establishment of civilian post offices on military installations and the usual postal finance, mail handling, carrier delivery and collection, and special delivery services consistent with United States postal laws and regulations, normal standards of the Postal Service, and changing military requirements;
2. Establish and operate postal concentration centers, as needed, for the concentration, sorting, and delivery or dispatch of military mail in accordance with requirements of the Department of Defense.
3. Process military mail in an expeditious manner while efficiently separating mail for the Armed Forces prior to delivery or dispatch;
4. Furnish information to the Department of Defense to permit proper routing of military mail prior to its entry into civilian postal channels;
5. Authorize the establishment of military post offices as branches of designated civilian post offices;
6. Extend stamp credits from designated civilian post offices to postal finance offices and other custodians of postal effects;
7. Assist the Department of Defense by informing postmasters and the public of proper addressing practices, applicable restrictions, and other military mail matters of interest.
V. Administration
A. The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs and Logistics) shall serve as the point of contact with the United States Postal Service and shall implement and administer this agreement for the Department of Defense. The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs and Logistics) may enter into supplemental agreements with the United States Postal Service as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this agreement.
B. The Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, shall serve as point of contact with the Department of Defense and shall implement and administer this agreement for the United States Postal Service. The Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group, may enter into supplemental agreements with the Department of Defense as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this agreement.
VI. Review and Amendment
This agreement may be amended at any time by mutual agreement. It shall be reviewed every five years by the Department of Defense and the Postal Service.
VII. Effective Date
This agreement is effective when signed by both parties, and supersedes the existing agreement dated February 2, 1959, as amended. To the extent provisions in any other agreement between the Postal Service and the Department of Defense are inconsistent with this agreement, this agreement takes precedence.
For the Department of Defense:
Deputy Secretary of Defense
For the United States Postal Service:
Postmaster General
February 21,1980
Appendix A, USPS-Department of Defense Postal Agreement: Definitions
Accountable Equipment - Postal Service equipment entrusted by an accountable postmaster to a custodian of postal effects for use at a military post office.
Accountable Mail - A term for registered, numbered-insured, and certified mail.
Aerial Mail Terminal - A Department of Defense facility established at foreign airports or U.S. overseas bases to send, receive, distribute, combine, transfer, and dispatch military mail.
Aerial Port - An airfield that has been designated for air movement of personnel and material and as an authorized port for entrance or departure from the country in which it is located.
Airport Mail Facility - A Postal Service mail processing installation established to concentrate, transfer, receive, distribute, and dispatch air eligible mail.
Armed Forces - The United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and components thereof.
Army or Air Force Post Office - A military post office, activated, staffed, and operated by the Department of the Army or Department of the Air Force to serve authorized organizations and personnel.
Bulk Mail Centers - Postal Service mail processing centers that comprise a nationwide system for concentration, distribution, and transportation of third and fourth class mail and second class mail without time value.
Civilian Post Office - A United States post office, branch, station, or money order unit operated by employees of the Postal Service or under contract with that agency.
Continental United States - The 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia.
Custodians of Postal Effects - Members or civilian employees of the Armed Forces accountable for administration of the postal effects entrusted to them by the Postal Service for the operation of military post offices. Civilian custodians of postal effects are supervised by members of the Armed Forces.
Department of Defense - The executive department that includes the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the military departments, Defense agencies, the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Unified and Specified Commands.
Financial Postal Clerk - A civilian employee of the Armed Forces who receives or delivers incoming or outgoing mail and performs financial services at a military post office. Financial postal clerks are supervised by members of the Armed Forces.
Fleet Mail Center - A facility operated by the Navy to receive, distribute, transfer, and dispatch military mail for transportation to, from, and within overseas areas.
Fleet Post Office - A Naval activity established within the Continental United States by the Chief of Naval Operations near a Postal Concentration Center for the purpose of providing a standard mail address for forces afloat and for mobile shore-based units and activities overseas and maintaining liaison with and furnishing mail routing and dispatching information to appropriate civilian and military postal authorities.
Mail Clerk - (e.g., unit mail clerk, mail orderly, consolidated mailroom clerk, Postal Service Center clerk). A member or civilian employee of the Armed Forces, or an employee of a civilian agency, who receives or delivers incoming or outgoing mail at a civilian or military post office or designated mailroom, on behalf of a military unit or civilian agency.
Mail Control Activity - A civilian or military facility engaged in the handling of mail, i.e., an aerial mail terminal, airport mail facility, bulk mail center, fleet mail center, military mail terminal, or Postal Concentration Center.
Mail Directory - An alphabetical listing by name of individuals served and those departed. Inside the United States, mail directories are maintained by military units to process undeliverable military mail for personnel in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less. Outside the United States, mail directories are maintained by units, military post offices and central or area postal directories to process undeliverable military mail for personnel of the command.
Mail Directory Service - A search of mail directory files for the name of the addressee of undeliverable military mail and endorsing each piece to show a forwarding address or reason for nondelivery.
Mailroom - A facility operated by the Department of Defense for the receipt and delivery of mail for military units or other authorized organizations and agencies,
Military Departments - The Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.
Military Mail - Domestic and international mail which bears a military address or return address and that, at some stage in its transmission, is in the possession of the Department of Defense.
Military Mail Terminal - In the United States, a mail control activity that provides information for the in-transit processing, dispatch, and transportation of military mail addressed to overseas military post offices. Overseas, a military facility established and operated to meet the requirements of the area or overseas command to receive, distribute, relabel, dispatch, control, or regulate the flow of bulk outgoing and incoming mail.
Military Post Office - A branch of a designated United States civilian post office established by authority of the Postal Service and operated by one of the military departments. The term includes Army or Air Force Post Offices, Navy Post Offices, and such Coast Guard Offices as may be established.
Military Postal Clerk - A member of the Armed Forces designated to perform postal duties.
Military Postal Service - The command, organization, personnel, and facilities established to provide, through military post offices, a means for the transmission of mail to and from the Department of Defense, members of the Armed Forces, and other authorized agencies and individuals.
Navy Post Office - A military post office activated, staffed, and operated by the Department of the Navy to serve authorized organizations and personnel.
Postal Concentration Center - A Postal Service facility at which military mail is concentrated for processing and delivery or dispatch.
Postal Effects - All stock, funds, and accountable equipment entrusted to the Department of Defense by the Postal Service for military postal operations. Postal effects include postage stamps, stamped paper, and funds derived from their sale; blank money order forms, paid money orders, and money order funds; fees collected for special mail services; and any accountable equipment furnished by the Postal Service.
Postal Finance Officer - A custodian designated to maintain wholesale quantities of postal effects and nonaccountable equipment and supplies issued to retail custodians of postal effects, for the operation of military post offices.
Postal Service - The United States Postal Service, an independent establishment of the Executive Branch of the Government of the United States, established under the authority of Title 39, United States Code, to provide postal services to the people of the United States.
Postal Service Center - A facility operated by the Air Force for receipt and delivery of military mail.
United States - The 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the territories and possessions of the United States.
Supplemental Postal Agreement: Administrative Details
I. Transportation
A. The Department of Defense agrees to arrange for military mail transportation from overseas postal facilities to commercial or military terminals in the United States and between military postal activities within overseas areas.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Arrange for military mail transportation to overseas postal facilities from commercial terminals in the United States and make transportation arrangements when the postal services of another country are required. However, this does not preclude Military Departments from making direct arrangements for the transportation of military mail to or between designated overseas points on a short term basis when operational requirements dictate.
2. Provide inbound and outbound mail transportation between the postal concentration centers and military or commercial air or surface carriers.
3. Transport mail between civilian post offices on military installations and the receiving or dispatching Postal Service facility.
II. Personnel
The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Appoint mail clerks and issue them uniform identification cards.
2. Assign only qualified personnel to duties in military post offices, mailrooms, mail control activities, and other postal facilities. No persons convicted of a crime involving theft or moral turpitude or disciplined for any action reflecting unfavorably upon their integrity shall be assigned to postal duties. Those having a history of psychiatric disorder, alcoholism, or drug abuse may be so assigned if medical evidence of current good health, sufficient to meet published Postal Service standards, is available. This does not preclude the Department of Defense from establishing requirements that are more stringent than the published Postal Service standards.
III. Equipment
A. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Provide equipment and furniture necessary for the operation of civilian post offices located on military installations.
2. Furnish equipment and supplies for use in military post offices. Equipment shall be new or serviceable and shall be issued in accordance with mutually determined issuance standards. Supplies and accountable equipment shall be furnished without charge. Nonaccountable equipment shall be furnished on a reimbursable basis beginning in FY 1982.
3. Repair equipment for which it has a unique capability.
B. The Department of Defense agrees to transport such equipment between the continental United States and the overseas destination.
IV. Delivery
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Decline to accept Collect on Delivery mail for delivery at military post offices.
2. Not provide special delivery service.
3. Deliver mail to personnel in a temporary duty status, in training, and where delivery requirements exceed Postal Service standards.
4. Deliver accountable mail, delivery of which is restricted by the sender, through mail clerks, only upon the written authorization of the addressee when it is impracticable for the addressee to accept delivery in person at the civilian post office.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Neither accept nor forward to military post offices any Collect on Delivery mail.
2. Provide delivery service on military installations in the United States commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided for civilian communities of comparable characteristics. Postal Service criteria shall be used in considering extensions of delivery service. Mail to principal administrative buildings or commands shall be delivered in bulk. The Postal Service agrees to also provide the mail in bulk to personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less. Where criteria will not allow free delivery service to be established or extended, the Postal Service agrees to provide the mail for individuals in bulk to basic units. However, in locations with adjacent civilian communities having delivery service, the Postal Service agrees to submit proposals to the Department of Defense to furnish service to groups of receptacles consistent with mutually agreed criteria and funding.
3. Deliver accountable mail addressed to military personnel, at military installations served by civilian post offices, to the addressees or mail clerks upon proper receipt.
V. Claims
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Assume financial liability, under military claims procedures, for loss, damage, theft, wrong delivery, or rifling of accountable mail after receipt from or prior to delivery to a civilian or military post office by a mail clerk employed by the Department of Defense.
2. Reimburse the Postal Service for claims submitted by the Postal Service for the value of postal effects embezzled or lost through negligence, errors or defalcations while in the possession of military post office personnel. Reimburse the Postal Service for claims paid by the Postal Service for losses of accountable mail through negligence, errors, or defalcations while in the possession of military post office personnel.
a. To be reimbursable, claims must be submitted within one year from the discovery of the loss by the Postal Service.
b. In all just and expedient cases, the military departments may request the Postal Service to take action under 39 U.S.C. 2601(a)(3) to adjust, pay or credit the account of a Military Post Office, Postal Finance Officer, Military Postal Clerk, Financial Postal Clerk, Custodian of Postal Effects, or persons acting in those capacities for any loss of Postal Service funds, papers, postage, or other stamped stock or accountable paper, under the same standards as such credit is granted to Postal Service employees.
B. The Postal Service agrees to relieve custodians of postal effects of responsibility for the amount of the invoice of any shipment of stamps or stamped paper lost in transit as a result of casualty.
VI. Logistical and Administrative Support
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Furnish adequate facilities for civilian post offices located at military installations solely in support of the installation's mission. Utilities and local telephone service shall be furnished on a reimbursable basis beginning in FY 1982.
2. Offer billeting and meals to civilian post office employees who work at military installations on the same basis as those offered to Department of Defense civilian employees.
3. Issue invitational travel orders for Postal Service representatives who, at the request of the Department of Defense, are assigned to perform inspections, investigations, or audits of overseas military postal operations.
B. The Postal Service agrees to:
1. Reserve the right to discontinue civilian post offices on military installations where existing conditions endanger the health, safety, or welfare of its employees.
2. Furnish office space for related military mail terminals, fleet post offices, or liaison units at postal concentration centers.
VII. Audits and Inspections
A. The Department of Defense agrees to:
1. Assist Postal Service representatives in surveying, inspecting, and auditing military postal operations.
2. Conduct surveys, inspections, investigations, and audits of Department of Defense postal facilities and operations as needed to verify that accountable postal effects are on hand and properly protected, that all revenue due the Postal Service is being collected and properly accounted for, and that the service rendered is efficient and in accordance with Postal Service and Department of Defense regulations.
B. The Postal Service agrees to assign Postal Inspectors or other representatives of the Postal Service, as practicable, to conduct surveys, inspections, investigations, and audits of military postal operations to assure that efficient postal service is maintained.
VIII. Mail Sortation
A. Except in time of war or other emergency as determined by the Secretary of Defense, the Postal Service agrees to:
1. Sort mail for overseas forces in fixed base units to the five digit Army Post Office/Fleet Post Office ZIP Code separation. Mail for ships and other mobile units shall be sorted to the mobile unit by ZIP Code or name when warranted. Mail for maneuver forces, air groups, submarine groups, units in transit or temporary duty status for 180 days or less, and other similar units shall be separated in accordance with the needs of the Department of Defense. The Department of Defense agrees to develop mail routings for all of the above mail and provide the routing instructions to the postal concentration centers of the Postal Service.
2. Sort mail for the forces at installations in the United States where delivery receptacles are not provided to basic military units or numbered boxes in groups of approximately 200, so far as practicable and mutually agreeable to the Postmaster and military authorities concerned.
B. In time of war or other emergency as determined by the Secretary of Defense, the Postal Service agrees to:
1. Allow the Department of Defense to control ZIP Code assignment to all military units.
2. Specify jointly with the Department of Defense the sorting of mail for overseas forces and forces at installations in the United States.
C. Postal Service criteria shall be used to assign ZIP Codes to military installations in the United States.
D. The Department of Defense and the Postal Service agree to cooperate in the assignment and use of overseas ZIP Codes.
1. Normally each military installation shall have one five digit ZIP Code, although special circumstances may be considered in assigning additional ZIP Codes. Additional ZIP Codes shall only be assigned if all resulting separations receive at least 1,000 pieces of mail per day. The implementing procedures for nine digit ZIP Codes shall be jointly developed.
2. The Department of Defense agrees to make every reasonable effort to see that its components have the correct ZIP Code in their address and return address. The Postal Service agrees to make every reasonable effort to see the correct ZIP Code is in the address and return address of mail for military units and personnel originated by other government agencies and the civilian sector. Since the ZIP Code furnishes the Postal Service with its sole method of forwarding Army Post Office and Fleet Post Office mail, the Postal Service agrees to return to sender at the post office of origin all mail for Army Post Office or Fleet Post Office addresses that does not have an authorized Army Post Office/Fleet Post Office ZIP Code.
IX. Mail Forwarding
A. Where the Department of Defense delivers the mail it agrees to provide directory service for undeliverable-as-addressed military mail and endorse each piece to show a forwarding address or reason for nondelivery.
B. Where the Postal Service delivers the mail it agrees to maintain change of address forms and endorse forwardable mail that is undeliverable as addressed.
X. SAM/PAL Law
A. This paragraph provides for the joint development of regulations as required by 39 U.S.C. 3401 (f) (1976) by the Postal Service and the Department of Defense concerning administration of the "SAM/PAL Law." Each party agrees to designate one or more organizational counterparts to serve on a committee to discuss conditions and regulations under which the SAM/PAL law will be jointly administered.
1. For the Postal Service, the designees are: The Assistant Postmasters General, Mail Processing Department, and Rates and Classification Department, or their designees; and, the Chief Postal Inspector or his designee.
2. For the Department of Defense, the designee is: The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Supply, Maintenance and Transportation) or his designee.
B. Neither party shall take any unilateral action with respect to implementing policies, conditions, or regulations promulgated exclusively under the SAM/PAL law without prior consultation with the other party. Committee meetings may be held upon written request of either party. Following such consultation, a joint committee report may be prepared for transmission to the respective managements.
C. Nothing herein is intended to provide for the joint administration of any activity whose administration is not provided for by 39 U.S.C. 3401 (f) (1976).
D. This section supersedes the supplementary agreement dated September 30, 1976 concerning "Joint Administration of Title 39, United States Code, Section 3401 (The SAM/PAL Law) by the United States Postal Service and the Department of Defense."
Xl. Review and Amendment
This Agreement may be amended at any time by mutual agreement. It shall be reviewed every five years by the Department of Defense and the Postal Service.
Xll. Effective Date
This Agreement is effective when signed by both parties.
For the Department of Defense:
Assistant Secretary of Defense
For the United States Postal Service:
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group
February 22, 1980

Appendix B: Publication 38-A
Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations (June 1983)
A. Purpose
This publication describes the postal services available to military installations in the United States. The term United States includes the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the territories and possessions. These guidelines describe and/or expound upon USPS Publication 38, Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense, February, 1980.
B. Distribution
1. Initial. Distribution is limited to the affected Management Sectional Centers.
2. Additional Copies. Order additional copies from your area supply center using Form 7380, Supply Center Requisition.
C. Comments and Questions
Address any comments or questions regarding the content of this publication to:
Office of Delivery and Retail Operations
USPS Headquarters
Washington, DC 20260-7220
D. Effective Date
This publication is effective July 1, 1983.
Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group

I. Delivery Service
A. Policy
Mail delivery service on military installations in the United States should be commensurate with the delivery service that would be provided civilian communities of comparable characteristics.
B. Basic Services
1. Official Military Mail
Deliver official mail addressed to principal commands on military installations in bulk.* (*Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or Military units are housed in a single building deliver all mail to a central point in the building.) Principal command are normally corps, fleets, the installation headquarters, divisions, wings, other major commands and equivalent Navy organizations located on the military installation.
2. Civilian Business Mail
Deliver mail addressed to civilian operated businesses such as the commissary, post or base exchange, bank, etc. as addressed.
3. Military Unit Mail
Deliver official and personal mail addressed to military units such as battalions, groups and similar organization in bulk.* (*Note: In instances where two or more principal commands or Military units are housed in a single building deliver all mail to a central point in the building.) Mail addressed to units such as supply depots, maintenance activities and publication centers generating a sufficient volume to warrant delivery shall be delivered in bulk.
4. Delivery Option
Although the above services are available to military installations this does not prohibit the military or a civilian business from electing to pick up their mail from the postal facility or requesting the Postal Service to deliver all mail to a control point on the installation.
C. Additional Services
1. Permanent Party Personnel
a. Family Quarters. Provide service to new residences on military installations through centralized delivery units in accordance with the prevailing national policy for extension and establishment of delivery service. Delivery service currently provided may be converted to centralized delivery service when agreed to by officials of the military installation and the Management Sectional Center (MSC) Postmaster.
b. Apartment Type Bachelor Quarters. Delivery service shall be provided in accordance with USPS Publication 17, Apartment House Mail Receptacles Regulations and Manufacturing Standards, through centralized delivery units to bachelor quarters with apartment house configuration and where units are occupied by one individual. For the purposes of this provision, apartment house configuration consist of buildings containing multi-residential units, each with complete living quarters consisting of a living room and bedroom or combination living-sleeproom, kitchen-kitchenette, and bath.
c. Non-apartment Type Bachelor Quarters. Provide delivery in bulk in one of the following manners, as agreed to by officials of the military installation and the MSC Postmaster:
(1) Delivery in bulk with official military mail.
(2) Delivery in bulk to a single delivery point.
For the purpose of this provision, non-apartment bachelor quarters are buildings containing multi-residential units and each unit is occupied by one individual; each unit containing a living room and bedroom or combination living-sleeproom and bath.
d. Barracks. Do not provide delivery service to barracks. For the purpose of this provision, barracks consist of buildings containing multi-residential units. The units are occupied by one or more individuals sharing a common bath and/or cooking facilities.
2. Non-permanent Party Personnel
Regardless of the type of housing, provide delivery in bulk to personnel in training and personnel and basic units in a transient or temporary duty status of 180 days or less.
3. Undeliverable as Addressed Mail
Deliver mail not specifically addressed to a building, command, or unit, to the installation directory service or to a point agreed upon by officials of the military installation and the MSC Postmaster. After the correct address has been supplied by the directory service, the mail is returned to USPS custody and delivered in the appropriate manner, or delivery may be made by officials of the military installation.
4. Parcel Post
Deliver ordinary parcel post in the same manner as other mail.
5. Special Delivery and Express Mail
Provide Special Delivery and Express Mail service to the same delivery points as other mail.
6. Accountable Mail
a. Where agreements authorizing the military to handle accountable mail have been made, accountable mail addressed to individuals or organizations that receive their mail from the military after delivery in bulk, will be delivered in bulk to the same delivery point as other mail, assuming any required payments are made. In the absence of the necessary agreements, or if required payments are not made, leave notices at the appropriate delivery point for transmission to the addressee.
b. Where bulk delivery of accountable mail is made, list the items as required on Form 3883, Firm Delivery Book.
c. Where the Postal Service provides delivery to civilian businesses, family quarters and apartment type bachelor quarters, attempt to deliver accountable mail to the addressee at the door. If the attempt is unsuccessful, a notice will be left.
d. For purposes of this provision, accountable mail consists of numbered insured, certified, registered, COD, customs and postage due mail.
7. Marking Up and Forwarding Mail
a. Where bulk delivery is made, the military or the civilian business will be responsible for marking up and forwarding mail in accordance with postal regulations.
b. Where the Postal Service provides delivery service to individual receptacles, the Postal Service will be responsible for marking up and forwarding mail.
8. Post Offices Providing Neither City nor Rural Delivery
At post offices with no city or rural delivery service, the military may arrange to pick up the mail in bulk and disseminate it to the addressees.
II. Collection Service
A. Policy
Collection boxes should be provided on all military installations receiving city delivery service.
B. Collection Box Locations
1. Major Administrative Areas
Install collection boxes where the greatest mail volume is generated and where boxes are convenient to the greatest number of administrative offices.
2. Civilian Business Areas
Install a collection box in front of or adjacent to the base/post exchange or commissary accessible to the greatest number of civilian or military personnel using the facilities in the area.
3. Troop Areas
If collection boxes in the troop living areas are about 1 mile apart, the density of these boxes is considered to be adequate. Additional collection boxes should be placed in front or adjacent to consolidated mess halls to ensure they are accessible to the greatest number of military personnel.
4. Family Quarters Area
Collection boxes should be located throughout the areas as needed. As a general guide, placements at 1 mile apart are considered to be adequate. They should not be placed in areas receiving motorized delivery to curbside boxes or delivery to centralized delivery points.
C. Frequency of Collection
1. Major Administrative and Civilian Business Areas
a. Monday through Friday. Schedule at least one collection daily as late as possible, but not later than 5:00 p.m.
b. Saturday. Schedule a collection as late as possible in the day but not earlier than 1 p.m. If the administrative offices are regularly closed on Saturday, do not schedule a collection in the administrative area.
c. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
2. Troop Areas
a. Monday through Friday. Schedule one collection a day usually to coincide with a collection in the administrative area.
b. Saturday. Schedule collection as late as possible in the day but not earlier than 1 p.m.
c. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
3. Family Quarter Areas
a. Monday though Saturday. Schedule one collection a day to be made as the letter carrier passes the collection box during the normal course of deliveries.
b. Sunday and Holidays. No collections.
D. Removal of Collection Boxes
Collection boxes may be removed if a box in any area averages less than 25 pieces per collection day.
Ill. Mail Processing
A. Policy
Distribute mail to military installations by separations which are practical, mutually agreeable to the officials of the military installation and MSC Postmaster concerned, and consistent with the USPS policy to provide the military with service commensurate to that provided the civilian population of the United States.
B. Distribution Procedures
1. Official Military and Civilian Business Mail
a. Sort official military mail to principal commands.
b. Sort civilian mail to individual functional entities (e.g., credit union, Red Cross).
2. Basic Units
a. Sort official and personal mail to basic units consisting of approximately 200 personnel, or numbered boxes in groups of approximately 200 so far as practicable and mutually agreeable to the military authorities and MSC Postmaster.
b. Unique sortations are acceptable if they are mutually agreeable with the military authorities and MSC Postmaster.
3. Residential Mail
a. Mail for apartment type bachelor quarters may be sorted to street name and building number.
b. Sort mail for non-apartment type bachelor quarters to a single separation.
c. Sort mail for family quarters by address into separations for subsequent carrier handling.
4. Basic Operating Concepts
a. No distribution will be provided to departments or offices within a principal command.
b. The depth of the sortation provided will be determined by volume, density, addressing method, and situations unique to the installation.
c. When the MSC Postmaster determines that sortation to basic military units is not practical, the requesting military official will be provided an explanation.
d. In instances where officials of the military installation and MSC Postmaster cannot agree upon the level of sortation to be provided, the matter will be referred by the MSC Postmaster through normal channels to Postal Service Headquarters for resolution.
IV. Retail Services
A. Policy
The Postal Service will provide convenient and effective retail services on military installations commensurate with those provided comparable civilian communities. The MSC Postmaster and the installation commander will share responsibility for providing retail services.
B. Responsibilities
1. The MSC Postmaster will:
a. Determine the level of service required.
b. Select the appropriate type(s) of retail units needed.
c. Provide for the cleaning and staffing of classified retail units.
d. Establish appropriate hours of service.
e. Provide retail services that are convenient for the majority of the people who live and work on the installation.
2. The Military will:
a. Provide conveniently located, adequate and safe facilities to house the retail units.
b. Provide security.
c. Consult with postal officials to resolve issues relating to postal service.
C. Types of Retail Units and Services Offered
The following are the various types of retail units listed in descending order and the various levels of service offered:
1. Classified Stations/Branches: All retail services. In addition post office box service may be provided.
2. Contract Stations/Branches: Basic retail and postal services as specified by contract. In addition post office box service may be provided.
3. Self Service Postal Centers: Stamps, envelopes, parcel mailing, if equipped with acceptance unit and currency and coin changer.
4. Multi-Commodity Vending Machine: Stamps, envelopes, postal cards and minimum fee insurance.
5. Stamp Booklet Vending Machine: Vend books of stamps.
6. Stamp Vending Machine: Vend single or multiple number of stamps from coils.
E. Deployment of Retail Units
The number and type(s) of retail units that will be deployed on a military installation will be based upon:
1. Population of installation on normal workday. This population includes military personnel, dependents, civilian workers, and other authorized personnel obtaining services on the installation.
2. Projected use of unit(s) - number of customers served, number and types of transactions, and revenue.
3. Physical layout of the installation. For example, two installations may have the same population, however, on one installation the population is centered in one general area, whereas on the other installation there are several population centers that are miles apart. Therefore, the number of retail units required to serve the latter may be greater than the first installation.
4. Distance to the nearest post office that is not on the installation.
F. Basic Deployment Criteria
1. The deployment of classified or contract stations or branches on military installations will be addressed on a case-by-case basis considering the specific needs and characteristics of the installation.
2. The following are basic deployment criteria for the various types of self service retail units. These criteria are flexible to the extent that if a particular military installation fails to meet the established population and revenue criteria and there is clearly a need for a self service unit, discretion should be exercised to provide the self service unit(s) appropriate to the circumstances.
Note: An Area Maintenance Officer must be available in the area.
Type Self Service Unit
Population
Revenue per Annum
SSPC
5,001 & Up
$30,001 -&- UP
Multi-Commodity Vending Machine
1,501 & Up
$ 9,001 -&- UP
Stamp Booklet Vending Machine
1,501 & Up
$ 9,001 -&- UP
Stamp Vending Machine
Under 1,500
Under $ 9,000
V. Implementation
A. These guidelines outline the levels of service available to military installations. The Postal Service recognizes that some military installations are receiving levels of service that exceed these guidelines. Therefore, local management must not make any changes which would reduce the present levels of service to conform to these guidelines without USPS Headquarters approval.
B. Effective July 1, 1983, new service provided to military installations must not exceed these guidelines except as in VI. These guidelines also serve to rescind USPS Headquarters letter of March 23, 1982, subject: Service to Military Installations.
VI. Request for Service That Exceeds These Guidelines
In some instances military installations may request levels of service which exceed these guidelines. The MSC Postmaster may negotiate with the military to provide the requested service in exchange for adjustments in the present levels of service (collections, distribution, delivery and retail service) or converting door or curbline delivery to centralized delivery. The District Manager or designee must approve all such conversions. The carrier hours saved must be at least sufficient to offset the additional hours to be expended for the new service.
VIl. Follow Up
A. For the remainder of PFY 1983 and PFY 1984, MSC Postmasters must provide USPS Headquarters, through normal channels, a report of all service adjustments as they occur.
B. The report must be submitted not later than 5 days after a final decision is made in the matter,
C. The report must contain the following:
1. Military installation name and ZIP Code.
2. The post office name and ZIP Code.
3. The action requested, by whom, and date of request.
4. The resolution and effective date of the adjustments.
5. The Cost/Savings expressed in workhours by craft and dollar value.

Senior Assistant Postmaster General, Operations Group

Appendix C: Resources
Purpose
The purpose of this appendix is to provide handy references for your postal operation and to the customers you support. Not every available source is listed. Please add to the list others sources you routinely use.
Manuals, Handbooks, Publications, Forms
The following USPS documents and forms may be good resources for both USPS managers and Department of Defense managers.
Many of these documents are available on the corporate intranet at click on "Information," then "Policies and Procedures," then the type of document, then either "By Document ID Number" or "By Title," and then scroll down to the desired document and/or on the Internet at click on the "Business" tab, then "Get Info," then "Postal Periodicals and Publications," then on the type of document (for example, "Handbooks" or "Publications", and then scroll down to the desired document). (All administrative computers in Associate Office Infrastructure (AOI) sites and all Delivery Unit Computer sites have access to the corporate intranet.)

Document Title
Doc ID
Address Change Service
Pub 8
Address Information Systems Products and Services
Pub 40
Addressing for Success
Pub 221
Administrative Support Manual
ASM
Automation and Retail Equipment
Pub 150
Consumer and Business Guide to Preventing Mail Fraud
Pub 300-A
Consumer's Guide to Postal Rates and Fees
Pub 123
Consumer's Guide to Postal Services & Products
Pub 201
Customer Guide to Filing Domestic Claims or Registered Mail Inquiries
Pub 122
Customer Guide to Filing Inquiries and Claims on International Mail
Pub 122-A
Delivery Confirmation Technical Guide
Pub 91
Designing Flat Mail
Pub 63
Designing Letter Mail
Pub 25
Designing Reply Mail
Pub 353
Directives and Forms Catalog
Pub 223
Domestic Mail Manual
DMM
Glossary of Postal Terms
Pub 32
Guidelines for Providing Postal Services on Military Installations
Pub 38-A
Hazardous, Restricted, and Perishable Mail
Pub 52
History of the Postal Inspection Service
Pub 259
International Mail Manual
IMM
International Postal Rates and Fees
Pub 51
Mail Transportation Contracting Guide
Pub 33
Metering Your Mail
Pub 125
Packaging for Mailing
Pub 2
Packaging Pointers
Pos 74
Postal Addressing Standards
Pub 28
Postal Agreement with the Department of Defense
Pub 38
Postal Crime Prevention: A Guide for Businesses
Pub 301
Postal Employee Crime Prevention
Pub 302
Postal Explorer User Guide
Pub 821
Postal Operations Manual
POM
Preparing Standard Mail (A)
Pub 49
Priority Mail
Pub 20
Procedures for Mailer Applications
Hbk DM-701
Prohibitions and Restrictions on Mailing Animals, Plants, and Related Matter
Pub 14
Purchasing Manual
PM
Quick Service Guide
Pub 95
Some Things Were Never Meant To Be Mailed
Not 107
Supply and Equipment Catalog
Pub 247
Understanding the Private Express Statutes
Pub 542
USPS Tag Guide
Pub 23-A

Form Title
Doc ID
Address File Standardization on Diskette
PS 5603
Application and Voucher for Refund of Postage and Fees
PS 3533
CAPS Application Form
PS 6001*
Debit Authorization Form
PS 6003*
Local Account Information Form
PS 6002*
Local Setting of Postage Meter Licensed at Another Office
PS 3618
National Five-Digit Zip Code & Post Office Directory Order Form for Mail Order Use
PS 4243
Postage Meter Activity Report
PS 3601-C
Postage Statement-Regular Standard Mail-Permit Imprint
PS 3602-R
Zip+4 Code State Directory Order Form for Mail Order Use
PS 4242

* PS Forms 6001, 6002, and 6003 are accessible on the Internet at click on the "Business" tab, then "Get Info," then "Forms," then "Centralized Automated Payment System (CAPS," and then on the desired form).
Other Available Documents
The following documents can be accessed from the NCSC web site at www.usps.com/ncsc/products/products.htm#publications.
a. Address Information System (AIS) Products Technical Guide (including AIS Products Order Form).
b. Address List Management System (ALMS) Training Guide.
c. TIGER/ZIP Technical Guide.
d. Z4Change Technical Guide.
e. ZIPMove Technical Guide.
Equipment and Supplies
Postal equipment and supplies are found in Publication 247, Supply and Equipment Catalog. It contains instructions for ordering, gives specification information and stock numbers on products, lists obsolete or discontinued items, and provides an index by description, PSIN (Postal Service Item Number), and stock number.
This catalog is available in several formats:
a. Paper. Requisition paper copies through the MDC as follows:
(1) Use Touch Tone Order Entry by calling 1-800-332-0317, option 1, then option 2. (Select Quick Pick 226, or enter SN 7610-02-000-7982.)
(2) Send an F3Fill-completed PS Form 7380 by cc:Mail to MDC Customer Service @ TOKS001L.
(3) Mail a completed PS Form 7380 to the following address:
SUPPLY REQUISITIONS
500 SW MONTARA PKWY
TOPEKA KS 66624-9702
b. CD-ROM. The CD-ROM version of Publication 247 is called the National Electronic Catalog and is available through Materials Customer Service (MCS) at 1-800-332-0317. It is also available on the CD-ROM version of Postal Explorer.
c. Online. Corporate intranet access is available at the following address: http://blue.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/pubs/pub247/247tc.pdf.
Web Addresses
Web addresses change periodically. Please note any changes you encounter. Remember to modify any "bookmarks" (short cuts to frequently used web sites) for web addresses that change.
The web addresses listed below are generally available to the public. Additional web sites are available to postal officials for official business through the corporate intranet at All administrative computers in Associate Office Infrastructure (AOI sites and all Delivery Unit Computer sites have access to the corporate intranet.) For further information, contact your district Information Systems manager.
U.S. Postal Service
http://caps.usps.gov - Link to the Centralized Automated Payment System (CAPS) home page, with further links to Overview, Services and Supplies, Q & A, Account Inquiry, Account Inquiry Help, and Forms.
http://pe.usps.gov - Link to Postal Explorer, a virtual library of postal information designed for business mailers, including document searches of the DMM and IMM.
http://ribbs.usps.gov - Link to the Rapid Information Bulletin Board System (RIBBS) home page, which contains links to addressing, business forms, classification reform, calendar and events, Federal Register notices, weather updates, and much more.
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files - Link to address change service (ACS), address quality services, coding accuracy support system (CASS) computerized delivery sequence (CDS), track/confirm, Global Delivery Services, etc.
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files/addressing - Find military address information, USPS addressing publication links, sample addresses, and more.
http://es.usps.com - Link to the U.S. Postal Service home page. (Please note that the U.S. Postal Service can also be reached at http://www.usps.gov.)
http://es.usps.com/cpim/pubsbus2.htm - Find business periodicals and publications fast. This also provides a link to the Postal Bulletin, Memo to Mailers, Mailers Companion, Quick Service Guides, and Postal Explorer.
http://www.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/bulletin/pb.htm - Link to the Postal Bulletin home page.
http://www.usps.gov/ncsc - Link to National Customers Support Center for products, services, publications, certification programs, ZIP Code Lookup, and Address Information.
Military Postal Service Agency
http://www.hqda.army.mil/mpsa - Link to the Military Postal Service Agency (MPSA), which ensures movement of military mail worldwide to authorized users of the military postal system and is an official extension of the U.S. Postal Service outside the United States.
Department of Defense OMM@hqda.army.mil - The e-mail address for the Department of Defense Official Mail Manager, MPSA for inquiries for official mail concerns on domestic official mail.
Vendors
http://ribbs.usps.gov/files/vendors - This site identifies vendors and highlights their programs and/or products.
GSA
http://policyworks.gov/FEDMAIL - Learn how GSA works with Federal agencies to develop, evaluate, and advocate policies and guidelines to improve mail management and the rapid handling and accurate delivery of mail at the lowest possible cost.
Affiliations/Conferences
Postal Customer Council Program (PCC)
The Postal Customer Council Program (PCC) is a national program that provides mailers with a forum for exchanging ideas for improved mail service and discussing new and existing USPS products, programs, regulations, and procedures. Customers can learn about the latest technology, equipment, and software, discuss matters of mutual concern, get answers to questions, voice opinions, make suggestions, and receive explanations on new programs. Contact your local USPS account representative or business center for information and assistance.
Mailers Technical Advisory Committee (MTAC)
The Mailers Technical Advisory Committee (MTAC) is a group of mailing industry representatives and USPS officials that provides technical information, advice, and recommendations about postal services, programs, regulations, and requirements. The members represent associations of large and small commercial mailing organizations, related mailing services, and various industry groups.
National Postal Forum
The National Postal Forum is a conference of postal management, major business mailers, and suppliers of postal products and systems who discuss common problems and solutions and also changes in mailing standards and mailing technologies. The Forum meets semi-annually for several days and provides business sessions, numerous networking opportunities, and an exhibition area displaying the latest in products and services. For more information, contact your local USPS account representative or business center, or http://www.npf.org.
The MPSA Official Mail Manager Workshop
The MPSA Official Mail Manager Workshop sponsors training for all Department of Defense activities, and it is also open to all Federal agencies. Training includes basic technical postal information including the following topics:
a. Reducing postage costs.
b. Computing postage.
c. Classes of mail.
d. Special services.
e. Postage meter management.
f. USPS automation.
g. Private Express Statutes.
For more information, call 703-325-0674, fax a request to 703-325-9534, or send an e-mail Department of Defense OMM@hqda.army.mil.
GSA Interagency Mail Policy Council
The Interagency Mail Policy Council (IMPC) is a collaborative effort of all Federal agencies based on new initiatives to develop the best regulations, policies, and options for Federal agency mail management and distribution.

MAIL COM

MAIL COM is a semi-annual educational conference and exhibition sponsored by MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution, and the Mail Systems Management Association (MSMA). MAIL COM offers business mailers numerous educational sessions, networking opportunities, and an exhibit area displaying the latest in products and services. For more information, contact your local MSMA chapter or MAIL COM directly at the following address:
MAIL COM
PO BOX 441
BRADLEY BEACH NJ 07720
Training
Local Training
The official mail manager on a military installation may have formal training available. Contact the official mail manager to inquire about availability and installation orientation opportunities.
Professional/Private Corporation Publications (Newsletters, Magazines, Papers)
Mailers Companion
The Mailers Companion is a free monthly newsletter for USPS personnel and business mailers. It offers the latest USPS information essential to effective mailings, and also includes information on Domestic Mail Manual revisions, classification reform, mail processing networks, address management, technology, mailing standards, rulings, and other relevant issues, as well as a column for readers' questions and comments. (It was formerly known as the Mailroom Companion.)
Memo to Mailers
Memo to Mailers is an official USPS publication announcing new programs, ideas, technology improvements, etc.
MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution
MAIL: The Journal of Communication Distribution presents diverse postal-related topics covering upcoming postal events, personnel initiatives, USPS automation efforts, Internet enhancements of the work environment, and much more. It also contains a comprehensive resource section.
Mailing and Systems Technology (MAST)
Mailing and Systems Technology (MAST) is another diverse postal-related publication covering a multitude of issues from purchasing products, services, and equipment, to support operations and mail service providers. It also furnishes insight into personnel issues, such as roles of supervisors and managers, safety in the workplace, and training. It also contains product profiles and technology updates.
Office Systems 90
Office Systems 90 provides a variety of information on technology, mailroom efficiency, product and equipment reviews, and resources. It also has personnel related topics for managers and employees.
Postal World
Postal World is the original and leading biweekly independent newsletter for business mailers (25 issues/year, $387/year). It features reports about mail center operations of all kinds as well as mail regulations and private carriers. It focuses on reducing costs, boosting services, and upgrading mail personnel status within an organization. For more information (including how to obtain a free trial of Postal World), see its web site at http://www.zip.ucg.com/news_mag.html.

Appendix D: Glossary
This glossary provides definitions to military terms that may be used by Department of Defense representatives in their dealings with the U.S. Postal Service. Although these terms may vary from one military branch to another, they should be useful in clarifying special situations that may arise. This glossary is provided as a general reference tool rather than as a source of definitions for terms used within this handbook.

Adjutant General's Office - the office on an Army base responsible for delivery of mail to military personnel in dormitories and barracks. Officials from the Adjutant General's Office should contact the U.S. Postal Service if there are any problems with mail to these customers.
APO/FPO Mail - domestic mail and international mail that bears a U.S. military delivery address or return address and that, in some stage of its transmission, is in the possession of the Department of Defense . This is mail that is being sent to or received from military installations located outside the Continental United States (CONUS). This mail may be official or personal in nature. This mail is centralized at certain locations such as San Francisco and New York for transport overseas. When mail is received in the CONUS from these facilities, letter mail is normally received in sleeved half trays, flats are received in sleeved plastic flat tubs, and parcels are received in #1 sacks.
BITC - acronym for "base information transfer center," which is the Department of Defense mail center on Air Force bases. The BITC handles and meters official mail.
centralized mail metering facility - a facility that collects official mail from a group of Department of Defense installations in a specified area. This facility packages mail into presort or other groupings to reduce postage costs. It also maintains individual mail counts on the mail presented by each Department of Defense installations. Such a facility is generally staffed by GSA employees. Currently, the Navy is the only branch to use such facilities.
consolidated mail - outgoing official non-time-critical First-Class Mail that is accumulated at the base Department of Defense mail center and consolidated into one Priority Mail package for shipping. Consolidated mail must be clearly labeled as such by the dispatching office. Consolidation can occur daily, weekly, or anything in between. Consolidation at destinating offices are to be based on normal routing volumes.
DOIM - acronym for "Department of Information Management," which is the Department of Defense mail center on an Army base. The DOIM handles and meters official mail.
family housing - individual quarters designed for military personnel and their families. By agreement, the U.S. Postal Service provides city delivery service for these quarters. The Department of Defense installation is responsible for the maintenance of the mailboxes.
guard mail - term used on Marine Corps bases and some Navy bases to describe interoffice mail.
gunner - the Marine Corps warrant officer usually responsible for mail services on a Marine Corps installation.
Holy Joe - term used on Army bases to describe interoffice mail. This term is derived from the envelopes frequently used for such mail - they have a series of holes on the front and back.
military mail manager - the manager who is responsible for the mailroom on a Department of Defense installation and who handles official mail on that installation. On Air Force and Marine Corps installations, this individual is usually an enlisted person, and on Army installations, it is normally a GSA employee.
MPSA - acronym for "Military Postal Service Agency," a Department of Defense combined operation that is responsible for official military mail domestically and the APO/FPO system overseas. All four branches of the military contribute personnel to the MPSA, which has responsibility for official mail for all four branches. For APO/FPO mail, MPSA has one subsidiary organization for the Pacific theater and another for the European theater.
Provost Marshall - the office on an Army installation responsible for physical base security through police administration.
PSC - acronym for "postal service center," a centralized mailroom containing post office box style deliveries normally served by a contractor. This type of delivery is used primarily for permanent party dormitory housing primarily on Air Force and Navy installations. Many times, the PSC contractor also provides base locator service to redirect mail for newly arrived personnel or as a central location to identify the location of an individual on base.
schools - on many Department of Defense installations, training programs that may last from several weeks to several months. It is critical that all students be given their correct street mailing address. The failure to use proper street addressing for these customers results in most complaints of non-delivery.
secure mail - mail matter that contains information classified as "Secret." By regulation this mail is registered or sent via Federal Express. In this circumstance, mail may be registered with no intrinsic value.
TDY - acronym for "temporary duty" at another location. When military personnel are on TDY, the Department of Defense is responsible for holding the mail or forwarding it to the individual's new duty station.

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