Image of a rectangleTable of Contents

E             Executive Summary  2

Background   2

Overview   2

Mail Markets  2

1            Chapter 1: Introduction – Volumes & Trends  2

The Survey  2

U.S. Postal Service Volumes  2

Mail Flows  2

Household Mail 2

Classes and Markets  2

Report Organization  2

2            Chapter 2: Profile of Mail Usage  2

Introduction  2

Mail Volume and Demographics  2

Characteristics of Higher- and Lower-Volume Households  2

Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Households  2

Use of the Post Office   2

3            Chapter 3: Correspondence  2

Introduction  2

Correspondence Mail Volume   2

Correspondence Mail and Household Characteristics  2

Personal Correspondence   2

Business Correspondence   2

4            Chapter 4: Transactions  2

Introduction  2

Transactions Mail Volume   2

Transactions Mail and Household Characteristics  2

Bill Payment  2

Bills and Statements Received   2

5            Chapter 5: Advertising Mail 2

Introduction  2

The Advertising Market  2

Advertising Mail Volumes  2

Advertising Mail and Household Characteristics  2

Senders of Advertising Mail 2

Attitudes toward Advertising   2

Effectiveness of Advertising Mail 2

6            Chapter 6: Periodicals  2

Introduction  2

The Periodicals Market  2

Advertising’s Impact on Periodicals  2

Household Periodicals Volume   2

Periodicals Mail and Household Characteristics  2

Subscription Type   2

Volume Drivers  2

7            Chapter 7: Packages  2

Introduction  2

The Package Market  2

Postal Service Package Volume   2

Packages and Household Characteristics  2

Household Package Contents  2

B            Appendix B:  Methodology

Study Design and Methodology

Sample Design

Data Collection Method

Data Processing

Sample Demographic Profile

Data Weighting and Expansion


Image of a rectangleList of Tables and Figures

E             Executive Summary  2

Table E.1:  Mail Received and Sent by Households  2

Table E.2:  Household Mail Volume Received and Sent by Market Served   2

Table E.3:  Advertising by Mail Class  2

Table E.4:  Periodical Type Received   2

Table E.5:  Packages Received and Sent via the U.S. Postal Service   2

1            Chapter 1: Introduction – Volumes & Trends  2

Table 1.1:  Total Mail Volume: FY 2009, 2010, and 2011  2

Table 1.2:  Total Mail: Revenue, Pieces, and Weight by Shape, FY 2011  2

Table 1.3:  Total Mail: Revenue and Weight per Piece by Shape, FY 2011  2

Table 1.4a:  Total Domestic Mail Flows  2

Table 1.4b:  Total Domestic Mail Flows  2

Table 1.4c:  Domestic Mail Flows per Household per Week  2

Table 1.5:  Mail Received and Sent by Households  2

Table 1.6:  Pieces Received and Sent per Household   2

Table 1.7:  Mail Received and Sent by Households  2

2            Chapter 2: Profile of Mail Usage  2

Table 2.1:  Mail Volume and Demographics Average Annual Growth, 1981-2011  2

Table 2.2:  Characteristics of Higher- and Lower-Mail-Volume Households  2

Table 2.3:  Education of Higher- and Lower-Mail-Volume Households  2

Table 2.4:  Households by Income and Education  2

Table 2.5:  Households by Income and Age   2

Table 2.6:  Households by Size   2

Table 2.7:  Households by Number of Adults  2

Table 2.8:  Households by Type of Internet Access  2

Figure 2.1a:  Internet Access by Income and Type   2

Figure 2.1b:  Internet Access by Age and Type   2

Figure 2.2:  Broadband Subscribers  2

Figure 2.3:  Household Visits to Post Office in Past Month  2

3            Chapter 3: Correspondence  2

Table 3.1:  First-Class Correspondence Mail Sent and Received by Sector 2

Table 3.2:  Correspondence Mail Received by Income and Education  2

Table 3.3:  Correspondence Mail Sent by Income and Education  2

Table 3.4:  Correspondence Mail Received by Income and Age   2

Table 3.5:  Correspondence Mail Sent by Income and Age   2

Table 3.6:  Correspondence Mail Received and Sent by Household Size   2

Table 3.7: Correspondence Mail Received and Sent by Number of Adults in Household   2

Table 3.8:  Correspondence Mail Received and Sent by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 3.9:  Income and Education by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 3.10:  Personal Correspondence Sent and Received   2

Figure 3.1:  Personal Correspondence Sent by Income Group   2

Figure 3.2:  Personal Correspondence Sent by Age Cohort  2

Figure 3.3:  Holiday Greetings Received by Age and Income, FY 2009, 2010, and 2011  2

Table 3.11:  Personal Correspondence by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 3.12:  Business Correspondence Type (Sent and Received) by Sector (Millions of Pieces) 2

4            Chapter 4: Transactions  2

Table 4.1:  Transactions Mail Sent and Received   2

Table 4.1:  Transactions Mail Sent and Received (cont.) 2

Table 4.2:  Transactions Mail Received by Income and Education  2

Table 4.3:  Transactions Mail Sent by Income and Education  2

Table 4.4:  Transactions Mail Received by Income and Age   2

Table 4.5:  Transactions Mail Sent by Income and Age   2

Table 4.6:  Transactions Mail Received and Sent by Household Size   2

Table 4.7:  Transactions Mail Received and Sent by Number of Adults in Household   2

Table 4.8:  Transactions Mail Received and Sent by Internet Access  2

Table 4.9:  Income and Education by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 4.10:  Bill Payment by Method, FY 2009, 2010, and 2011  2

Figure 4.1:  Monthly Average Household Bill Payment by Method   2

Figure 4.2:  Average Monthly Automatic Deductions per Household   2

Table 4.11:  Types of Bills Paid by Mail 2

Figure 4.3:  Average Bills Paid per Month by Income and Age   2

Figure 4.4:  Bill Payment Method by Age   2

Table 4.12:  Bill and Statement Volumes by Industry  2

Table 4.13:  Average Monthly Bills and Statements Received by Method   2

5            Chapter 5: Advertising Mail 2

Table 5.1:  U.S. Advertising Spending Growth by Medium, 2009-2011  2

Figure 5.1:  Direct Mail as a Share of Total Advertising, 1990-2011  2

Table 5.2: Advertising Mail by Mail Classification  2

Table 5.3:  Advertising Mail by Mail Classification  2

Table 5.4:  Advertising Mail Received by Income and Education  2

Table 5.5:  Advertising Mail Received by Income and Age   2

Table 5.6:  Advertising Mail Received by Size of Household   2

Table 5.7:  Advertising Mail Received by Number of Adults  2

Table 5.8:  Advertising Mail Received by Internet Access  2

Table 5.9:  Income and Education by Type of Internet Access  2

Figure 5.2:  Advertising Volumes for First-Class and Standard Mail Advertising by Sender Type   2

Figure 5.3: Advertising Mail Behavioral Trends, FY 1987, 2009, 2010, and 2011  2

Figure 5.4: Treatment of Standard Mail by Type   2

Figure 5.5: Treatment of Standard Advertising Mail by Number of Standard Mail Pieces Received per Week  2

Table 5.10: Intended Response to Advertising Mail by Class  2

Figure 5.6:  Weekly Number of Intended Responses by Income   2


 

6            Chapter 6: Periodicals  2

Figure 6.1:  Periodicals Mail Volume per Person, 1971-2011  2

Figure 6.2:  Real Per-Capita Magazine Advertising Spending, 1980-2011  2

Table 6.1:  Periodical Type by Year 2

Figure 6.3:  Newspaper Circulation, 1970-2009*  2

Figure 6.4:  Daily Newspaper Readership, 1987-2011  2

Table 6.2:  Periodicals by Income and Education  2

Table 6.3:  Periodicals by Income and Age   2

Table 6.4:  Periodicals by Size of Household   2

Table 6.5:  Periodicals by Number of Adults in Household   2

Table 6.6:  Periodicals by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 6.7:  Income and Education by Type of Internet Access  2

Figure 6.5:  Subscription Type by Year 2

Table 6.8:  Periodicals by Sender Type   2

Figure 6.6:  Number of Periodicals Received per Week by Households by Income Group   2

7            Chapter 7: Packages  2

Table 7.1:  Total Package Market Volume Growth  2

Figure 7.1:  Package Delivery Market Segment Share   2

Table 7.2:  Postal Service Sent and Received Packages, FY 2009, 2010, and 2011  2

Figure 7.2:  Postal Service Sent and Received Packages by Household Income   2

Table 7.3:  Postal Service Received Packages by Income and Age   2

Table 7.4:  Postal Service Sent Packages by Income and Age   2

Table 7.5:  Postal Service Received Packages by Income and Education  2

Table 7.6:  Postal Service Sent Packages by Income and Education  2

Table 7.7:  Postal Service Received and Sent Packages  by Size of Household   2

Table 7.8:  Postal Service Received and Sent Packages  by Number of Adults in Household   2

Table 7.9:  Received and Sent Packages by Household Internet Access  2

Table 7.10:  Income and Education by Type of Internet Access  2

Table 7.11:  Contents of Postal Service Sent and Received Packages  2


Image of a rectangleExecutive Summary


This report documents the findings of the United States Postal Service’s Household Diary Study (HDS) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. The three main study purposes are to:

·         Measure the mail sent and received by U.S. households,

·         Provide a means to track household mail trends over time, and

·         Make comparisons of mail use between different types of households.

The report examines these trends in the context of changes and developments in the wider markets for communications and package delivery.

Background

The Household Diary Study survey, fielded continuously since 1987, aims to collect information on household use of the mail and how that use changes over time. The survey collects household information on demographics, lifestyle, attitudes toward mail and advertising, bill payment behavior, and use of the Internet and other information technologies.

The FY 2011 report covers Government Fiscal Year 2011, with comparisons to 2009, 2010, and other years, as appropriate.

The Household Diary Study collects information on household mail use and provides
a look at how that use changes over time.

Overview

In 2011, U.S. households received 127.5 billion pieces of mail, and sent 16.1 billion, as seen in Table E.1. Mail sent or received by households constituted 83 percent of total mail in FY 2011. Fifty-seven percent of the mail households received was sent Standard Mail. Only three percent of household mail was sent between households; the rest was sent between households and non-households.

Table E.1:
Mail Received and Sent by Households

 (Billions of Pieces)

Mail Classification

Received

Sent

First-Class Mail

47.8

15.6

Standard Regular Mail

60.3

Standard Nonprofit Mail

12.0

Periodicals

5.4

Package & Shipping Services

2.1

0.5

Total

127.5

16.1

Household to Household

4.6

Total Mail Received and Sent by Households

139.1

FY 2010 RPW Total *

167.9

Non-household to
Non-household Residual

28.8

Unaddressed

1.1

Source: HDS Diary Sample, FY 2011.
Note:  Totals may not sum due to rounding.
* Includes First-Class and Standard Mail packages.

Mail Markets

The Household Diary Study examines mail by the markets it serves. This design cuts across classes, but provides a foundation for understanding mail flows and the marketplace changes that affect them. Table E.2 shows the volume of household mail by market for 2009 through 2011.

Thirty-five percent of household mail contains correspondence and transactions, down from 36 percent in 2010. In terms of volume, total correspondence fell 3.3 percent compared to 2010. However, longer-term trends show that, over the past several years, correspondence fell more significantly. For example, since 2002, correspondence fell 33 percent. In part, the decline in correspondence is a continuation of long-term trends, but it is also strongly related to changing demographics and new technologies. Younger households send and receive fewer pieces of correspondence mail because they tend to be early adaptors of new and faster communication media such as e-mails, social networking, and smart phones.

Table E.2:
Household Mail Volume Received and Sent by Market Served

(Billions of Pieces)

Market

2009

2010

2011

Correspondence

13.2

12.9

12.6

Transactions

41.2

37.6

35.6

Advertising

85.1

83.5

85.0

Periodicals

6.0

5.5

5.4

Packages

3.7

3.6

4.0

Unclassified

3.6

4.7

3.9

Total

145.0

141.2

139.1

Source:  HDS Diary Sample, FY 2008, 2009, and 2011.
Notes: 
Correspondence and Transactions include 7.4 billion pieces of First-Class advertising-enclosed mail (excluded from totals).
Package volumes include ground packages and expedited, as well as
1.7 billion pieces of CD/DVD rentals.

For the first time, in 2011, more than 50 percent of all bills were paid electronically.

Electronic alternatives also affect transactions mail volume. Over time, automatic deduction and online bill pay account for a growing share of household bill payments. In fact, over the previous eight years, the percentage of bills paid by electronic methods increased from 17 percent in 2002 to 51 percent in 2011. In contrast, bills paid by mail decreased from 75 percent to 45 percent of total payments over the same period of time. This was the first time that more than half of bills were paid electronically.. In-person payments decreased from 8 percent in 2002 to 4 percent in 2011. Similarly, the Internet has contributed to some decline in the share of bills and statements households received through the mail. Bills and statements received online continue to grow at a fast pace, albeit from a relatively small base ( in 2011 households received an average of 2.8 pieces of bills and statements online, compared to 14.4 pieces in the mail) .

Advertising mail represented well over half (61 percent) of all mail received by households in 2011. As shown in Table E.3, 85 percent of all advertising mail received by households is Standard Mail (72.3 billion pieces). The remainder consists of First-Class Mail; either stand-alone advertising (5.3 billion pieces), or secondary advertising that is sent along with other matter (7.4 billion pieces).

Over time, the data show a steady decline in the share of First-Class advertising mail, from 21 percent in 2002 to only 15 percent in 2011.

Table E.3:
Advertising by Mail Class

Mail Classification

Volume
(Billions)

Percent of Total Advertising

First-Class Advertising

12.6

15%

Standard Regular Mail

60.3

71%

Standard Nonprofit Mail

12.0

14%

Total Advertising Mail

85.0

100%

Source:  HDS Diary Sample, FY 2011.

As shown in Table E.4, households received 5.4 billion Periodicals via mail in 2011, less than in both 2009 and 2010.  More than three-quarters of these were magazines. Newspapers are only 15 percent of total Periodicals, down from 35 percent in 1987. Contributors to the decline in newspaper volumes were lower circulation and readership levels, as well as a strong growth of the Internet as an alternative delivery method over the past decade.

Table E.4:
Periodical Type Received

Mail Classification

Volume
(Billions)

Percent of Total Periodicals

Newspapers

0.8

14%

Magazines

4.1

77%

Unclassified

0.5

9%

Total Periodicals

5.4

100%

Source:  Household Diary Study, FY 2011.

In 2011, households received 3.0 billion and sent 1.1 billion packages. Compared to 2010, total packages sent and received increased 13 percent, with most of the growth coming from First-Class packages.  In general, delivery from mail order and Internet retailers is an important driver of package volume. While the HDS data is not designed to quantify this, there are indications that online auction sites (like eBay) are responsible for some of the recent increase in packages sent by households.


Table E.5:
Packages Received and Sent via the U.S. Postal Service

(Millions of Pieces)

Mail Classification

2011

Received

Sent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

First-Class Mail

1,424

47%

969

87%

Expedited

374

12%

75

7%

Standard Mail

667

22%

Package & Shipping Services

546

18%

68

6%

Unclassified

2

0%

0

0%

Total Packages

3,013

100%

1,112

100%

Source:  HDS Diary Sample, FY 2011.
Notes:
Totals may not sum due to rounding.
Expedited includes Priority Mail and Express Mail.
First-Class packages include 17 billion pieces of CD/DVD rentals sent to and received from Netflix, Blockbuster, etc., reported in First-Class Mail letters in Tables E.1, 1.5, and 1.6.

 


Image of a rectangleChapter 1:  Introduction – Volumes & Trends


The United States Postal Service Household Diary Study (HDS) Report documents the findings of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 study. The HDS measures the mail sent and received by U.S. households, tracks household mail trends, and compares mail use between different types of households.

The Household Diary Study
provides a means to track
household mail trends over time.

The Survey

The Household Diary Study survey, fielded continuously since 1987, aims to collect information on household use of the mail and how that use changes over time. The survey collects household information on:

·         Demographics,

·         Attitudes toward mail and advertising,

·         Bill payment behavior, and

·         Use of the Internet and other information technologies.

These data are used for market research, forecasting, and strategic planning within the Postal Service.

The Survey Consists of Two Parts:

1)   An entry, or recruitment interview, conducted by phone or Web, collects demographic and attitudinal information from about 8,500 households.

2)       These households then receive a mail diary, which collects information on the mail the household sends and receives in a one-week period. Annually, about 5,200 households successfully complete the diary.

The data generated by these two instruments are the basis of the analysis in this report.

The HDS FY 2011 report covers the period from September 27, 2010, through September 25, 2011, roughly equivalent to the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) used by the Postal Service. Data from FY 2009 and FY 2010 are also reported on a GFY basis.

U.S. Postal Service Volumes

Serving a nation containing five percent of the world’s population, according to the Universal Postal Union, the Postal Service delivers approximately 40 percent of the world’s mail. The Postal Service delivered 167.9 billion pieces of mail in FY 2011—a decrease of 3.0 billion pieces, or 1.7 percent, from 2010.

Although the economic recession ended in June 2009, the sluggishness of the recovery that followed adversely affected mail volumes well into FY 2011. Additionally, the continuing migration of transaction and correspondence mail to the Internet and other electronic alternatives further exacerbated the decline in volumes. 

Standard Mail volume, consisting mostly of advertising material, is strongly correlated to the health of the economy.  Accordingly, in 2011, the slow recovery led to modest growth, as volumes rose only 2.6 percent over 2010 (about 2.2 billion pieces).  Even so, the growth represented the first increase since 2007, and was an improvement over flat volumes in 2010 compared to 2009

In 2011, First-Class Mail volume fell 6.4 percent (about 5 billion pieces), continuing a long-term negative trend that began 2001. Ongoing diversion of correspondence and transaction mail to electronic alternatives and the weak economy were key contributors to the decline. First-Class Single-Piece letters and cards, impacted mostly by the growing use of online bill payments and emails, fell 10.7 percent from 2010 to 2011. Presort letters and cards (which include most of the advertising material that is sent First-Class) fell 3.7 percent from the combined impact of electronic diversion and a sluggish economy.

The Postal Service estimates the revenues, volumes, and weight of mail pieces going through the postal network by using a combination of statistical sampling systems, mailing statements, and accounting data. These data are published in the Revenue, Pieces, and Weight (RPW) Reports.


Table 1.1 presents the RPW volumes for FY 2011, along with data for FY 2010 and FY 2009.

Table 1.2 reports revenue, pieces, and weight data by class and shape for FY 2011.

·         The letters column heading includes postcards and refers to pieces that are less than 11.5 inches wide by 6.125 inches tall and less than .25 inches thick.

·         Flats consist of pieces that are greater than 11.5 inches wide, 6.125 inches tall, or .25 inches thick, but less than 12 by 15 by .75 inches.

·         Parcels are pieces that are larger than 12 by 15 inches, or thicker than .75 inches.

Because of the difficulty involved in recording mail-piece characteristics in the Household Diary, these categories do not correspond precisely to the shape categories used by HDS respondents.

Table 1.3 is derived from Table 1.2 and shows the revenue per piece and weight per piece for each subclass of mail by shape.


Table 1.1:
Total Mail Volume: FY 2009, 2010, and 2011

(Billions of Pieces)

Mail Classification

2009

2010

2011

Mailing Services:

 

 

 

First-Class Mail:

 

 

 

Single-Piece Letters & Cards

31.6

28.9

25.8

Presort Letters & Cards

47.9

46.2

44.5

Flats

2.9

2.5

2.2

Parcels

0.6

0.6

0.6

Other *

0.8

0.3

0.3

Total First-Class Mail

          83.8

78.2

73.5

Standard Mail:

 

 

 

High Density & Saturation Letters

5.0

5.4

5.7

High Density & Saturation Flats & Parcels

11.8

11.4

11.4

Carrier Route

10.0

9.4

9.3

Letters

46.8

48.3

50.6

Flats

7.8

7.0

6.8

Not Flat-Machinables & Parcels

              0.7

0.7

0.7

Other *

              0.4

0.3

0.2

Total Standard Mail

          82.4

82.5

84.7

Periodicals

            8.0

7.3

7.1

Package Services

             0.7

0.7

0.7

USPS and Free Mail

             0.5

0.5

0.5

Total Mailing Services

        175.4

169.2

166.5

Shipping Services

             1.4

1.5

1.5

Total All Mail

176.8

170.9

167.9

Source: RPW Reports.
Note:  Totals may not sum due to rounding.
* Other includes: Negotiated Service Agreements (NSAs), International Mail, Express Mail, and Fees (not reported by shape).


Table 1.2:
Total Mail: Revenue, Pieces, and Weight by Shape, FY 2011

Mail Classification

Revenue

Pieces

Weight

(Millions of Dollars)

(Millions of Pieces)

(Millions of Pounds)

Letters

Flats

Parcels

Total

Letters

Flats

Parcels

Total

Letters

Flats

Parcels

Total

Mailing Services:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First-Class Mail:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single-Piece Letters & Cards

11,581

0

0

11,581

25,847

0

0

25,847

778

0

0

778

Presort Letters & Cards

15,488

0

0

15,488

44,494

0

0

44,494

2,233

0

0

2,233

Flats

27

2,787

0

2,814

20

2,211

0

2,231

6

449

0

455

Parcels

2

136

1,147

1,284

1

80

557

638

0

21

188

209

Total First-Class By Shape

27,098

2,923

1,147

31,168

70,363

2,290

557

73,210

3,018

470

188

3,675

Other*

 

 

 

1,011

 

 

 

310

 

 

 

51

Total First-Class Mail

 

 

 

32,178

 

 

 

73,521

 

 

 

3,726

Standard Mail:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High Density & Saturation Letters

768

0

0

768

5,654

0

0

5,654

238

0

0

238

High Density & Saturation Flats & Parcels

73

1,808

0

1,881

506

10,918

1

11,425

23

2,121

0

2,144

Carrier Route

26

2,196

0

2,222

125

9,211

0

9,336

5

1,988

0

1,993

Letters

9,707

0

0

9,708

50,584

0

0

50,584

2,667

0

0

2,667

Flats

1

2,488

1

2,491

3

6,777

3

6,783

1

1,709

0

1,710

Not Flat-Machinables & Parcels

0

0

651

651

0

0

734

734

0

0

322

322

Total Standard By Shape

10,575

6,492

652

17,720

56,872

26,906

738

84,516

2,933

5,818

322

9,074

Other*

 

 

 

106

 

 

 

176

 

 

 

19

Total Standard Mail

 

 

 

17,826

 

 

 

84,692

 

 

 

9,092

Periodicals:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Periodicals By Shape

13

1,795

4

1,813

75

6,995

6

7,077

5

2,712

8

2,725

Other *

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

0

Total Periodicals

 

 

 

1,821

 

 

 

7,077

 

 

 

2,725

Package Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Package Services
By Shape

0

236

1,342

1,578

0

263

412

675

0

381

1,403

1,784

Other*

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

0

Total Package Services

 

 

 

1,606

 

 

 

675

 

 

 

1,784

USPS and Free Mail

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

496

 

 

 

180

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Mailing Services
By Shape

37,687

11,447

3,145

52,279

127,310

36,455

1,712

165,478

5,956

9,380

1,922

17,258

Total Other*

 

 

 

1,153

 

 

 

983

 

 

 

249

Total Mailing Services

 

 

 

53,432

 

 

 

166,461

 

 

 

17,507

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shipping Services:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Shipping Services
By Shape

72

881

5,249

6,203

15

175

905

1,095

1

141

2,591

2,733

Total Other*

 

 

 

2,629

 

 

 

379

 

 

 

621

Total Shipping Services

 

 

 

8,832

 

 

 

1,473

 

 

 

3,354

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total All Mail

 

 

 

62,263

 

 

 

167,934

 

 

 

20,860

Total All Services**

 

 

 

3,476

 

 

 

1,362

 

 

 

870

Total All Mail & Services

 

 

 

65,739

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: RPW Reports.
Note:  Totals may not sum due to rounding.
* Other includes: NSAs, International Mail, Express Mail and Fees (not reported by shape).
** All Services include Ancillary and Special Services.

 


Table 1.3:
Total Mail: Revenue and Weight per Piece by Shape, FY 2011

<

Mail Classification

Revenue per Piece

Weight per Piece

(Dollars)

(Ounces)

Letters

Flats

Parcels

Total

Letters

Flats

Parcels

Total

Mailing Services:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First-Class Mail:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single-Piece Letters & Cards

0.448

 

 

0.448

0.482

 

 

0.482

Presort Letters & Cards

0.348

 

 

0.348

0.803

 

 

0.803

Flats

1.346

1.261

 

1.261

4.991

3.250

 

3.266

Parcels

 

1.703

2.060

2.013

 

4.153

5.402

5.236

Total First-Class By Shape

0.385

1.276

2.060

0.426

0.686

3.281

5.402

0.803

Other*

 

 

 

3.256

 

 

 

2.607

Total First-Class Mail

 

 

 

0.438

 

 

 

0.811

Standard Mail:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High Density & Saturation Letters

0.136

 

 

0.136

0.673

 

 

0.673

High Density & Saturation Flats
& Parcels

0.144

0.166

0.485

0.165

0.718

3.108

 

3.003

Carrier Route

0.205

0.238

0.702

0.238

0.678

3.453

7.318

3.416

Letters

0.192

 

 

0.192

0.844

 

 

0.844

Flats

0.462

0.367

0.443

0.367

5.046

4.035

0.709

4.034

Not Flat-Machinables & Parcels

 

 

0.887

0.887

 

 

7.012

7.012

Total Standard By Shape

0.186

0.241

0.885

0.210

0.825

3.460

6.990

1.718

Other*

 

 

 

0.604